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#21
Yuli Ban

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IBM reveals an entire standalone quantum computer at CES

Forget giant screens, how about giant computers? Tech giant IBM has taken the wraps off what it claims to be the world’s first integrated quantum computing system for commercial use.
The giant computer, a replica of which was on display at CES in Las Vegas this week, looks like something from Alien, or an upside-down bin suspended from the ceiling inside a glass case.
However, as IBM describes it, the machine sits inside a 9ft-wide case of half-inch thick borosilicate glass that forms a sealed, airtight enclosure. This houses a motor-driven system that rotates for easy maintenance. Vibration interference or ‘phase jitter’, which can interfere with the coherence of qubits, is minimised by a combination of steel frames and cryostat control electronics.

20 qubits! Nice for 2018 2019!


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#22
Sciencerocks

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LG Has 20X65 Foot Curved TV Waterfall Display at CES
Brian Wang | January 10, 2019

 

LG Electronics has an immersive exhibit of flexible commercial displays at CES® 2019. The “LG OLED Falls” display features 260 LG OLED digital signage screens, in curved and flat configurations.

It measures 20 feet high and 65 feet wide, displaying alluring images of curves of the desert, waterfalls, ocean and light. The incredible video experience is further enhanced by advanced, immersive audio, which is included in 2019 LG OLED TVs for the consumer market.

 

https://www.nextbigf...lay-at-ces.html



#23
Raklian

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IBM reveals an entire standalone quantum computer at CES

Forget giant screens, how about giant computers? Tech giant IBM has taken the wraps off what it claims to be the world’s first integrated quantum computing system for commercial use.
The giant computer, a replica of which was on display at CES in Las Vegas this week, looks like something from Alien, or an upside-down bin suspended from the ceiling inside a glass case.
However, as IBM describes it, the machine sits inside a 9ft-wide case of half-inch thick borosilicate glass that forms a sealed, airtight enclosure. This houses a motor-driven system that rotates for easy maintenance. Vibration interference or ‘phase jitter’, which can interfere with the coherence of qubits, is minimised by a combination of steel frames and cryostat control electronics.

20 qubits! Nice for 2018 2019!

 

 

The article says 50 qubits. 


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#24
Raklian

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Sony joins the 8K club, rolls out its new flagship LCD TV at CES

 

There's usually an abundance of new TVs at CES, and the latest models to arrive are from Sony and include the company's first 8K-resolution set for consumers. The Z9G LCD TV is available in 85-inch and 98-inch sizes, to show off all those 33 million pixels.

 

https://newatlas.com...v-launch/57932/

 

With just three more doublings, we'll approximate the same amount of detail we get with our eyes. 


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#25
Yuli Ban

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IBM reveals an entire standalone quantum computer at CES

Forget giant screens, how about giant computers? Tech giant IBM has taken the wraps off what it claims to be the world’s first integrated quantum computing system for commercial use.
The giant computer, a replica of which was on display at CES in Las Vegas this week, looks like something from Alien, or an upside-down bin suspended from the ceiling inside a glass case.
However, as IBM describes it, the machine sits inside a 9ft-wide case of half-inch thick borosilicate glass that forms a sealed, airtight enclosure. This houses a motor-driven system that rotates for easy maintenance. Vibration interference or ‘phase jitter’, which can interfere with the coherence of qubits, is minimised by a combination of steel frames and cryostat control electronics.

20 qubits! Nice for 2018 2019!

 

 

The article says 50 qubits. 

Only this article says 50 qubits. 

The writer likely mixed up this one with the 50-qubit quantum computer IBM showed off last year.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#26
Sciencerocks

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Zero Mass Water’s Hydropanels Pull Water From Thin Air At #CES2019

   https://cleantechnic...air-at-ces2019/

January 11th, 2019 by Kyle Field

“Where does your water come from?” Friesen hit me with the question almost before I had time to sit down. I stuttered. Uh…well…heading into an interview where I thought I would be asking all the questions, I was thoroughly unprepared for the question, but stammered off on my way just the same. “Southern California is naturally a desert so we import most of our water from Northern California and the lands to the east. Uhhh.” I knew he was a water guy, but the question still caught me off guard.

Cody Friesen and his team at Zero Mass Water are looking to the future and in that future, they see water being the most precious resource for humans on this planet. A planet that’s warming as a result of catastrophic climate change only exasperates the current challenges with water. Developed nations suffer from broken infrastructure and a lack of transparency about where their water comes from and what’s actually in it while people in developing nations are forced to trek kilometers each day to fetch water or pay a premium for bottled water.

 



#27
caltrek

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The biggest change at CES

 

https://theweek.com/...gest-change-ces

 

Introduction:

(The Week) The annual gadget bacchanalia that is the Consumer Electronics Show is always a chance to glimpse the future. Among this year's most exciting reveals was a TV that can actually roll up like a blind — it probably will cost five figures, but it really will be coming to stores this year.

 

But as cool as a roll-up TV is, it's hardly the most surprising thing at this year's CES. The most surprising thing has been all the sharing.

 

For at least the past decade, each year's shiniest products came with a familiar pitch: Buy this thing because it's the key to our very special walled garden. In simple terms, that often meant things like "buy a Sony TV and get special access to movies from Sony Pictures," but more generally, it meant joining an ecosystem — buy this device and lock yourself in to Google's Android or Amazon's Alexa or Apple's iOS (not that the latter would ever deign to appear at CES).

 

It would appear that is no longer the case. At this year's CES, every company's ecosystem is now also appearing on every other company's stuff. The barriers that once separated products into little vertical silos appear to be crumbling. One might almost say that tech is having a "tear down this wall" moment — if walls hadn't suddenly become symbolic of much bigger issues.

 

What it does mean, however, is that we are entering a new era in tech that is ostensibly a bit more consumer friendly. But it also suggests that the biggest tech companies are shifting their business models.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#28
caltrek

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Google Built An Entire Theme Park In Parking Lot At CES

 

https://techcrunch.c...cause-they-can/

 

Entire Article:

(TechCrunch) For a lot of companies, the whole point of CES is to get attention — and in this sea of noise, that’s tougher than it might sound. Someone else will always have a bigger screen, or a prettier booth, or a better celebrity guest.

 

So Google tried something a bit… different this year. They built a friggin’ theme park ride.

 

They built a two-story building right in the middle of the Las Vegas Convention Center parking lot, and the ride takes up the entire upper floor. From the pre-ride line experience (complete with animatronic Grandma talking with guests in line), to a holding room that uses clever projections to tell a story (Don’t forget the cake for Grandma’s birthday party! Assistant can help!), to the ride itself… it’s just ridiculous. The work and engineering that went into this — and the quality of what they built for something that’ll only be here for a few days — is seriously absurd.

 

I’ve been to Disneyland more times than I should probably admit. Strip away the Google branding and throw in some hidden Mickeys and this ride would’ve felt right at home there. There are definitely some bits that felt like they were inspired by Disney rides (Grandma in line reminded me of the mid-line Mr. Potato Head on Midway Mania, and they pulled off a star effect in a way that reminded me a bit of Peter Pan’s Flight), but it had plenty of clever twists and tricks of Google’s creation, too.

 

I can’t begin to calculate how much they spent to make this (I asked Google a few times, but they never answered). But if the goal was to go way, way, way over the top, to the point where the “top” is just some vague speck on the ground, they succeeded. Part of me wants to be cynical about the excessive spending here, but… well, that’s just sort of what CES is.

 

grandma.jpg?w=680


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#29
Yuli Ban

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CES's Flying Taxis and Other Car News

  • A Russian robotics company says its product was hit by a Tesla Model S on Autopilot at CES. The whole thing was probably a hoax, but it demonstrates that the public still has a lot to learn about how automated car tech works.
  • Nightmarish, or fun? CES is all the excuse Hyundai needs to introduce its legged car concept. It can roll on roads or extend its appendages and clawed feet to climb stairs or trek over difficult terrain.
  • In Vegas, the Israeli company Guardian Optical Technologies rolled out its new “Optical Cabin Control” feature. The sensor-enabled tech is for spying—but hopefully for good. It promises to monitor drivers’ eyes, head, and, yes, butt movements to ensure they’re paying attention while using new, semiautonomous car tech. (The butt sensors are for ensuring airbags are properly armed while there are passengers in the car.)
  • Electric Harley-Davidson motorcycles? Their $29,799 price tag?
  • Mapping and location data company HERE unveils SoMo, an app platform for all the cab companies that have been pummeled by ride-hail. It will launch in 15 global cities, including London, Amsterdam, New Orleans, and LA.
  • Meet the Ava XC, “what Tony Stark would build if he had an Edward Scissorhands phase.” Looks aside, it’s the largest known electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft to fly yet, and its makers wouldn't be mad if it were deployed in an honest-to-Jove flying taxi service.
  • The experienced helicopter-smiths at Bell would like you to say hello to its own vertical-takeoff aircraft, the 6,000-pound Nexus, which uses six tilting, ducted fans to reach a top speed of 150 mph, with a 150-mile range. The hybrid-electric craft might one day be the backbone of Uber’s much-touted air taxi program.
  • VW’s Electrify America initiative (which it was forced to launch as part of its Dieselgate settlement) announces a fun innovation: chargers that will recognize your electric car and bill you automatically for your charge-up.
  • Ford says toodle-oo to Chariot, its app-based shuttle service, which it acquired just two years ago for more than $60 million. Its collapse is further proof, I write, that making money off transportation is hard.
  • Some good news for Uber and Lyft, according to a new Pew Research survey: 36 percent of Americans now say they’ve used ride-hail services, compared to 15 percent three years ago. Less good news: Just 8 percent say they use it weekly. The companies would like to see more users turning to their services—be them ride-hail, scooters, or bikes—more regularly.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: CES, consumer technology, 2019, 5G, internet of things, VR, artificial intelligence, smart home, drones, smartphones

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