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Study shows the Sahara swung between lush and desert conditions every 20,000 years, in sync with monsoon activity


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#1
Sciencerocks

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Study shows the Sahara swung between lush and desert conditions every 20,000 years, in sync with monsoon activity
January 2, 2019 by Jennifer Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 

A new analysis of African dust reveals the Sahara swung between green and desert conditions every 20,000 years, in sync with changes in the Earth’s tilt. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Sahara desert is one of the harshest, most inhospitable places on the planet, covering much of North Africa in some 3.6 million square miles of rock and windswept dunes. But it wasn't always so desolate and parched. Primitive rock paintings and fossils excavated from the region suggest that the Sahara was once a relatively verdant oasis, where human settlements and a diversity of plants and animals thrived.

Now researchers at MIT have analyzed dust deposited off the coast of west Africa over the last 240,000 years, and found that the Sahara, and North Africa in general, has swung between wet and dry climates every 20,000 years. They say that this climatic pendulum is mainly driven by changes to the Earth's axis as the planet orbits the sun, which in turn affect the distribution of sunlight between seasons—every 20,000 years, the Earth swings from more sunlight in summer to less, and back again.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...-years.html#jCp


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Maximus

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It would be mesmerizing to watch a time lapse of this process. Perhaps I'll launch a few satellites with ultra high definition cameras to film from a stable orbit--once I become a billionaire, of course.


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Sciencerocks

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It would be mesmerizing to watch a time lapse of this process. Perhaps I'll launch a few satellites with ultra high definition cameras to film from a stable orbit--once I become a billionaire, of course.

Once we have time travel ;) You can focus on this and i'll have another satellite watching tropical cyclones over the last 20,000 years.


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