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Will Netflix and Amazon kill domestic TV networks leading to homogenised entertainment?


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#1
Nick1984

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I can't speak for other countries, but this is a trend I'm noticing more and more in the UK.

Traditionally BBC, ITV and Sky have dominated. These three networks, barring the odd American movie, showed British-made TV for most of their schedules.

In recent years audiences, especially the young, have abandoned these traditional channels in favour of Californian giants Netflix and Amazon Prime which, for the most part, show American content.

Will we soon find ourselves in a world when Netflix and Amazon dominate global TV, where most content is produced in America for American tastes, and local/national content is severely diminished?

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#2
Nick1984

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A couple of recent articles on the subject

https://theguardian....-more-on-demand

The BBC is facing a crisis over its youth audience after admitting that young people are spending more time watching Netflix than all of its BBC TV services each week, and listening to more music on streaming services such as Spotify than BBC radio stations.

The corporation has traditionally dominated the UK TV and radio landscape but is having to reinvent the way it connects with media-savvy young audiences who are turning increasingly to digital services – mostly provided by US tech companies such as YouTube, Apple and Netflix – for entertainment and news.




https://www.dailymai...ndersnatch.html

'Netflix won Christmas': Fans praise streaming services 'festive' shows including Bird Box, You and Black Mirror's Bandersnatch as BBC sees another year of falling ratings

Netflix have garnered high praise for their new releases with some fans saying they have 'won Christmas' as their latest shows have left fans gripped.



#3
Raklian

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The Americanization of the world's cultures continues, so it seems. 


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#4
Nick1984

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The Americanization of the world's cultures continues, so it seems.

Only around 5% of content is non-American such as Japanese anime, Bollywood movies and British comedies, the rest is American.

And what little original non-American content is there is highly Americanised...

https://medium.com/@...ed-ff10cdc41069

A prime example of such a threat is Degrassi. It is a Canadian drama franchise that accelerated the stardom of Drake, the rapper, and featured the lives of Canadian teenagers as they navigate high school. It was recently sold to Netflix. Although the storyline remains in Canada, Canadians reviewers cannot help themselves but noticed the Americanisation of the show. For instance, the school student counsellor is seen counselling students to consider, only American universities, which is almost unheard and not practised in most Canadian high schools.



https://www.telegrap...-welsh-valleys/

“Watching Sex Education on Netflix and I am confused about why this seems to be set in an American high school that's been dropped in the middle of England,” read one typical comment online.

The answer lies in Netflix’s ambitions to take on the BBC, which has sought to position itself as a broadcaster that invests in British ideas and talent while painting US rivals as tech companies that commission by algorithm.

Netflix wants to show a commitment to making shows in Britain while marketing them to a global audience more attuned to US high school movies than a wet weekend in South Wales.

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#5
rennerpetey

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Homogenised culture is the result of more and more contentedness.  Locality becomes irrelevant when you live in the digital community.  The only question was who was going to lead this digitization and therefore direct digital culture.  


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#6
Nick1984

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Homogenised culture is the result of more and more contentedness. Locality becomes irrelevant when you live in the digital community. The only question was who was going to lead this digitization and therefore direct digital culture.

Makes sense that in a connected world it's the big Silicon Valley companies that now control the flow of culture.

Netflix, Amazon, Google, YouTube, Apple and Facebook are all rapidly growing their entertainment and media output.

Also, being based in California giving them easier access to Hollywood talent meaning that traditional and non-US media companies just don't stand a chance.

When I was younger we relied on British companies for entertainment...

BBC, ITV and Sky for TV
HMV and Virgin for music
Odeon for movies
Sinclair Spectrum for games

Now we go to the big US companies for the above where the output in tailored to American culture and tastes.

#7
Alric

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It is kind of like the 4x strategy games, going for the culture victory by turning everyone to our side.



#8
Alislaws

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In the UK particularly, regardless of the fees charged by the service, ITV, Sky, Channel 4 ETC. all have an extra £150.50 a year in licence fees users have to pay. 

 

For Netflix & Amazon, people don't have to pay this. 

 

I have literally turned down a year of 'free' Sky TV (they do my internet, it was a deal) because even without them earning anything  it would cost me £12.50 per month. more than an amazon prime subscription (£7.99) that includes delivery bonuses etc. and approaching double the £6.99 Netflix subscription. 

 

So there's no way any Non-BBC company will be able to compete long term. 

 

The BBC just doesn't produce enough shows to take on the big US companies, especially at nearly twice the price. 

 

Also I don't know if its just me but considering it has 900+ channels, there is very little quality content available on Sky at any given time in my experience.






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