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Faster than light technologies


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#1
Mr.posthuman

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What is your thought about faster than light communication,travel,computing...etc .how can it be possible and what researchs and news that promote it ?

#2
Mr.posthuman

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Can it allow faster than light computing with infinite computing powers since it travel info into the past ? What about polarized synchrotron ftl communications and other concept of ftl technologies ?

#3
starspawn0

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Faster than light would violate the principle of causality, whereby it would appear you could send a signal backwards in time and that effects appear to precede causes:

 

https://en.wikibooks...cial_Relativity

 

That would open up all kinds of problems, and is one of the reasons people believe we can't travel faster than light.

 

....

 

The basic idea is this:  how do you decide what "now" is?  That is, how do you decide which events some very great distance away from you are happening at the same time?  Well, for example, you know that it takes light 1.3 seconds to be transmitted from the moon to the earth, and about 186 seconds from mars to earth, when the two planets are closest together (mars and earth are not always a fixed distance apart).  

 

So... let's say you set a clock at time t = 0, and then at time t = 1.3 seconds later you get a flash of light coming from the moon that informs you of something that happened there, and at time t= 186 seconds you get another flash of light coming from Mars telling you what happened there... you would declare these two events  --- one on the moon, and one on Mars -- and what was happening on earth at time t = 0, as being "simultaneous".  

 

Now, here's the really weird thing about light:  it appears to travel at the same speed to all observers.  So, if you are already near to the speed of light, and then you shine a beam of light in the direction you are travelling, to me on earth, that beam of light won't appear to be going twice as fast as light; it will be going as fast as light, no more and no less.  The velocities don't add.

 

This turns out to have really weird consequences for what we call "now".  You can see that in the second diagram in that wiki page.  If you are moving relative to me, we will end up disagreeing about "now". 

 

And then, if you read on, you will see how being able to send a signal faster than light really screws with causality.


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#4
CyberMisterBeauty

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Faster than light would violate the principle of causality, whereby it would appear you could send a signal backwards in time and that effects appear to precede causes:

 

https://en.wikibooks...cial_Relativity

 

That would open up all kinds of problems, and is one of the reasons people believe we can't travel faster than light.

 

....

 

The basic idea is this:  how do you decide what "now" is?  That is, how do you decide which events some very great distance away from you are happening at the same time?  Well, for example, you know that it takes light 1.3 seconds to be transmitted from the moon to the earth, and about 186 seconds from mars to earth, when the two planets are closest together (mars and earth are not always a fixed distance apart).  

 

So... let's say you set a clock at time t = 0, and then at time t = 1.3 seconds later you get a flash of light coming from the moon that informs you of something that happened there, and at time t= 186 seconds you get another flash of light coming from Mars telling you what happened there... you would declare these two events  --- one on the moon, and one on Mars -- and what was happening on earth at time t = 0, as being "simultaneous".  

 

Now, here's the really weird thing about light:  it appears to travel at the same speed to all observers.  So, if you are already near to the speed of light, and then you shine a beam of light in the direction you are travelling, to me on earth, that beam of light won't appear to be going twice as fast as light; it will be going as fast as light, no more and no less.  The velocities don't add.

 

This turns out to have really weird consequences for what we call "now".  You can see that in the second diagram in that wiki page.  If you are moving relative to me, we will end up disagreeing about "now". 

 

And then, if you read on, you will see how being able to send a signal faster than light really screws with causality.

 

I believe that faster than light can be achieved using exotic matter.



#5
starspawn0

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If that is so, something has to give.  E.g. causality breaks down.

 

Having causality break down is almost (but not quite as severe) like saying that

 

1 plus 1 equals 3.

 

"How do you know there isn't some exotic math that tells us that what we've always known about numbers is false?  What is a number, anyways?"

 

Seriously.  If you could send signals faster than light, you could make trillions of dollars on the stock exchange.  Just send tomorrow's stock results into the past, and invest appropriately.

 

This isn't about old, stodgy scientists that don't have an "open mind", and prematurely rejecting  the idea.  And it isn't like breaking the sound barrier.  This is like breaking the reality barrier.  


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#6
Mr.posthuman

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How do we know that light pulse travel faster than light speed if we doesnt detect its information ?




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