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Cellular frequencies, 1980-2040


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#1
wjfox

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mobile-frequencies-5g-6g-2020-2030.jpg


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#2
Jakob

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Is 6G a thing?



#3
wjfox

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Is 6G a thing?

 

Indeed it is. :)

 

https://www.futureti.../2018/11/22.htm

https://futurism.com...less-technology
https://www.cnet.com...6g-development/
https://www.networkw...ond-speeds.html


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#4
funkervogt

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Bear in mind that there are important limitations to terahertz-level data transmission.

 

 

Obviously, atmospheric attenuation poses a problem for using terahertz frequencies for long-range communication and radar. But how big a problem? To answer that question, I compared different scenarios for horizontal transmission at sea level—good weather, bad weather, a range of distances (from 1 meter up to 6 kilometers), and specific frequencies between 35 gigahertz and 3 terahertz—to determine how much the signal strength degrades as conditions vary. For short-range operation—that is, for signals traveling 10 meters or less—the effects of the atmosphere and bad weather don’t really come into play.

 
Try to send anything farther than that and you hit what I call the “terahertz wall”: No matter how much you boost the signal, essentially nothing gets through. A 1-watt signal with a frequency of 1 THz, for instance, will dwindle to nothing after traveling just 1 km.
 
...a terahertz signal will decrease in power to 0.0000002 percent of its original strength after traveling just 1 mm in saline solution, which is a good approximation for body tissue. 

https://spectrum.iee...about-terahertz

 

I agree that terahertz frequencies will be used for telecommunications in the future, but there will always be a need for an extensive network of physical cables to also transmit data. 






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