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First ever image of a black hole


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#1
wjfox

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Black hole picture captured for first time in space ‘breakthrough’
 
Wed 10 Apr 2019 14.00 BST
 
The first image of a black hole has been captured by astronomers, heralding a revolution in our understanding of the universe’s most enigmatic objects.
 
The picture shows a halo of dust and gas, tracing the outline of a colossal black hole, at the heart of the Messier 87 galaxy, 55 million light years from Earth.
 
The black hole itself – a cosmic trapdoor from which neither light nor matter can escape – is unseeable. But the latest observations take astronomers right to its threshold for the first time, illuminating the event horizon beyond which all known physical laws break down.
 
 

 

jrmiqK5.jpg


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#2
Yuli Ban

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Here's the full-sized original, at a whopping 183MB in size.
 
WARNING: do not click this link if you have a low data cap. I'm not lying when I say this is over 183MB. 


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#3
Raklian

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Here's the full-sized original, at a whopping 183MB in size.

 

WARNING: do not click this link if you have a low data cap. I'm not lying when I say this is over 183MB. 

 

Hey, can you edit the link? It doesn't work.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#4
Raklian

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Here's the full-sized original, at a whopping 183MB in size.

 

WARNING: do not click this link if you have a low data cap. I'm not lying when I say this is over 183MB. 

 

Hey, can you edit the link? It doesn't work.

 

 

It's fine now. It's just loading very slowly.

 

I have Google Fiber and it's taking forever. That says something. LOL


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#5
Yuli Ban

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^I've been continuously editing it. It should work now. That, or it's Schrödinger's hyperlink.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#6
Raklian

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Pretty neat knowing we're directly looking at an area in the Universe where laws of physics are scrambled up and turned upside down.  :biggrin:


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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#7
starspawn0

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It's what we expected to see, but doesn't really tell us what's going on inside.  There are theories saying that there's isn't really a black hole, that the event horizon doesn't really behave as predicted -- but that the region of space will still look "black".


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#8
Yuli Ban

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It's what we expected to see, but doesn't really tell us what's going on inside.  There are theories saying that there's isn't really a black hole, that the event horizon doesn't really behave as predicted -- but that the region of space will still look "black". 

That's the magic of black holes: they're places where our current understanding of physics completely collapses into a singularity. The singularity isn't referring to any specific point of the black hole itself— just our understanding of it. 

 

Black holes are essentially "just" stars too dense for light to escape their pull. But fucking with light in spacetime is like a stack overflow of reality.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#9
Raklian

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I think of black holes as "gravity balls" because they are essentially that. :D

 

Anything with visible mass exerts a gravitational pull to a degree, but with a black hole, we just can't be certain - so a "gravity ball".


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#10
Yuli Ban

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Or to put it another way: you're aware of the typical depiction of gravity, yes? That of the rubber sheet where black holes are so dense that they essentially punch through the sheet entirely? It's decent enough to get the job done, but it's not quite representative of reality since reality is not a 2D plane— but we don't have any good means of showing off how such would work in 3D and it can be very hard to visualize gravity in 3D as well. Maybe in the future with the rise of holograms/mixed reality, we'll be able to visualize it better, but imagine a tank of dirty water. There are little particulate pieces everywhere that clump together via the Cheerios Effect. The more pieces there are together, the greater pull the larger mass has because of static tensions, surface tension, and whatnot. Of course, water is not a vacuous medium so the particles don't actively fall into each other, but the effect still occurs. 

 
Move this into a vacuum and keep adding particles. The gravitational pull is happening in 3 dimensions, so they're not falling in any particular direction except towards the center of mass. Eventually, you won't have any way of knowing what's even happening anymore because no information can escape without violating relativity even if everything inside is "normal" (or at least as normal as a singularity can be). It's entirely possible that black holes are just extra-dense quark stars, an electromagnetic soup of strings floating in space, just as much as it's possible they're literal holes in spacetime. We just can't know because physics as we know it breaks down and stops working.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#11
Raklian

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Yes, there is a possibility that a black hole is a misnomer for what is simply an extraordinarily dense star, but as far as we know, there are no indications of that - all thanks to the event horizon phenomenon in which we cannot observe anything beyond that boundary so we can't arrive to testable conclusions about it, at least it's not making it easy for us.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#12
BlazingRocket

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Apparently, it took a coordination of many telescopes in many nations to achieve this image. Although the image might not be as "glittery" as artists' illustrations or sci-fi movies have shown them as, the fact that humanity was able to cooperate so well to capture this image may be in fact what is more dazzling.

 

Source: https://www.youtube....h?v=pAoEHR4aW8I



#13
Outlook

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Aw, I was expecting a full HD Interstellar type image.
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#14
eacao

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eye-o-sauron-03.jpg


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