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#61
Yuli Ban

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nytimes.com
Dow Jones Collapses by 3,000 Points: Don't Panic Just Yet
October 29, 2019 - Paul Krugman
 
There is a lot to get worked up about at the moment — many things, in fact, going in many directions at once.
 
But perhaps the most damning development of all, not just for the future of the markets, but for the future of the basic rules of capitalism, is the recent decline in financial markets. Not just because of the obvious tumble in stocks, but also because, on a global scale, bond yields have also sunk.
 
For example, Germany’s 10-year bund yield dropped below zero for the first time on record earlier this month, and within a few days many parts of the U.S. debt market were more expensive, or even more expensive, than Germany’s.
 
Germany’s 10-year bund yield dropped below zero for the first time on record earlier this month.
 
It’s far too early to panic, but this is a worrying development that demands a response. This isn’t just about financial markets. It’s also about the basic principles of finance — how they work, how they’re supposed to work, why they work in the first place. There is, for example, an inverse relationship between yield and prices. It’s not a coincidence that when investors expect more good news in the future, the price of a bond goes up. So when they anticipate a bigger raise in bond prices, we should expect to see lower interest rates and higher bond prices. But this “loonie” feedback loop is broken. And, by blowing up that feedback loop, it can also cause any number of other highly undesirable problems.
 
Any number of ill effects could flow from a collapse in bond prices — an economic slowdown, a crash in the price of raw materials, defaults on mortgage payments. But for the moment, we should be concerned that interest rates on many debt instruments have dropped below zero. This is likely to have a significant impact on the economy in the near term.
 
Another problem is the volatility that recent moves in interest rates have brought. Right now, the price of a 10-year bond is going to depend a lot on a far-flung group of brokers and bond fund managers. If we can’t get these guys to agree on which way the market is heading, it could lead to a slowdown in the price of bonds and, eventually, a slowdown in the rate of inflation. This would, in turn, cause a slowdown in growth.
 
This is, for the moment, a situation not totally without precedent. A similar incident occurred during the Global Financial Crisis, in the summer of 2009.
 
It’s hard to say how long the so-called “liquidity crisis” will last — after all, the global economy has been moving in the same direction for some time. But it’s clear that this could be a very long one indeed. It’s already extending into Europe, where, as I wrote last week, the coming November elections will determine the extent to which the European Central Bank cedes more power to the newly elected anti-establishment governments in Italy and Spain. And, coming in 2019, there’s the specter of the trade war between the U.S. and China.
 
For now, all we can do is hope for the best. If these developments push the European Central Bank, for example, into more expansionary policies and indeed into more aggressive intervention — even if it eventually proves to be too little too late — they should support a further strengthening of global economic growth.
 
Moreover, perhaps our main problems will not be with the fundamentals of the market, but with the psychology of investors and financiers. We have learned in recent years how fragile even seemingly secure markets can be: what happened in 2008 was caused by fear, not credit risk, the sharp decline in the prices of stocks, real estate and mortgages being the top of the market in recent months seems to reflect not only fear, but more irrational fear.
 
This is part of the weird and precarious nature of money. There are no rules, rules that investors should know to follow. Indeed, in many ways they have no sense of direction. A decade or so ago, for example, it was thought that stocks would hit new highs, and the “carry trade” that relied on interest rates being lower than they would be in the future was expected to work. But since 2008, and more especially since 2009, those two ideas have run up against reality. The patterns that used to guide the financial markets have all but evaporated.
 
We do have tools to mitigate the consequences of such amnesia — some global crisis, for example, or a Fed rate hike. But the greatest danger of all comes from those crucial few who are in touch with what’s happening in the world around them.
 
 

Visit grover.allenai.org to explore AI2's state-of-the-art fake news detector and generator.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#62
Archimedes

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First prompt:
 

 

 

Justified pessimism arises from an objective recognition of the wickedness and folly of men in general, it does not fall on individuals, though individuals may give the first impetus; it concerns all, and each individual is merely looked on as an example.

 

 

Response:

 

 

But man's weakness is a moral failing, not a weakness in the individual's character, nor is it a personal weakness. Man's weakness is a spiritual weakness, a moral weakness to which every soul needs to respond--if not to accept a God who must die for their moral weakness in the judgment of death, to put that up against the possibility of God who can forgive their moral weakness in the judgment of love with God. This is the moral condition which man is called upon to meet, and it is one of many such conditions. The condition is an ethical one, and the conditions in which man is called upon to meet it are moral conditions. There is no need to resort to moral justification for what is merely intellectual weakness: the intellect requires not moral justification, for if it was not moral, none of its parts would exist. Men are weak without being foolish, and there is no need to appeal to reason to show that intelligence can be said to have moral strength.

The spiritual condition of man in God's eternal justice is to be found in the very soul within us--in its spiritual weakness not of heart, but of understanding,

 

 

Going preachy on us, eh? Let's try something else.

 

Second prompt

 

 

Nothingness haunts being.

 

 

Response

 

 

A place where existence meets chaos. A black spot on your face which is as close as you will ever get to reality. Not a place that you go to escape, but a place where you live every day with every emotion and taste, and no matter how many times you try to remove yourself from it, that same fear is there, and it will stay with you forever because you need to know, so you can overcome it.

I remember I would find my mother at the age of nine or ten. She was at my house while I was getting in a car on a rainy day where she was waiting for me. She had made a statement to me that I would not be my mother if I made a mistake. The thought crossed my mind and I thought, well then it's the only way I am going to save myself.

I will always be afraid of being trapped within myself. The fear of being stuck somewhere between something I can't change and something I have to accept. We all have the urge to try and fix reality. However, reality is constantly breaking down in itself. The truth is all you can have is the thoughts of yourself and then the fear of not being able to deal with it. I would rather not live the life I want to have, I would rather live a life where I am surrounded by endless blackness than anything true

 

 

Text in red and bold is eerily similar to the thoughts I have one in a while...

 

So far, quotes by existentialist philosophers is bringing some interesting results.


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#63
Archimedes

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Prompt from Dälek (the band, not the Doctor Who villains).
 

 

What is to be done about pain? It's a question which has compelled man, the state, and the arts for much of their common history.
    One speaks not of physical pain, whose end is forecast in its beginning, either by cure or death.
But, rather that psychic pain which is the agony of the soul and the mind.
    The cry of the tormented is pain's commonest articulation, without words, without any meaning except the existence of pain itself.
It pleads for mercy, and shrieks in the excess of an inability to endure.
    Pleadings cease, and are overtaken by a rage so shattering that it flails the heavens, and draws back the tormentors in appalled bewilderment that what they have so heedlessly done could produced such clamor.

 



Response 1:

 


I feel certain the question might soon be closed as well as that of pain.

The words are of a very old origin. The most ancient of them are the words of the prophet Isaiah, who says: For they called me, the son of David, with a lament, and said, Behold, his son is dying by the sword: yet he made peace and made peace: he sent out Lazarus, and cast him into the sea.

I could not help wondering if my words were in any way inspired, or if they had been inspired

 



Too evangelical sounding, tried again. Response 2:

 


As to the question, therefore, of how to overcome this terrible anguish the most obvious and perhaps the most fatal is to know what the heart is to feel at rest. We can judge of this from this: A man sitting by a fire in the city, with a great many friends by him, would, on every day he sat, feel himself in anguish. He could look at his body and see the pain on his face, but he could hardly look at his face. In order to see such anguish, he should gaze, or perhaps listen to

 

 



#64
Yuli Ban

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Now using the new, more powerful 774M parameter GPT-2 on Talk To Transformer...

 

"I'm the King of Kung Fu, motherfucker!" screamed the King of Kung Fu, who then flying kicked a man through a building and slammed a grandmother against the pavement. Then he ran down the street and punched a man to death, dropping him on his widow and ending the rest of the family with a dropkick.
 
Randy Savage was the King of Kung Fu. When everyone else in The Savage family was hanging out, Randy was still at home, practicing Kung Fu. Savage had always said The King was his father; it was Savage himself who made the decision to kill The King, and was the sole responsible for his death. Randy didn't want to be The King. He hated his father; after all, he had killed him, and he would do it again. His entire family wanted him to be The King, but he couldn't do it because he hated his father.
 
He came down from his high horse, and the family went to bed. The next morning, Savage got on his motorcycle and rode through the town, killing everyone he ran into
 
 
 
 
 
"I'm the King of Kung Fu, motherfucker!" screamed the King of Kung Fu, who then flying kicked a man through a building and slammed  the front of his own vehicle into some bushes just to see what happened. But he missed. So he kicked in a car window and slammed the front of the driver's side into other passengers of the car.
 
That's what we call a "sporting punch". He's just not ready for a real one.

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#65
Yuli Ban

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BuPdP9k.png


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#66
Archimedes

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Input: excerpt from Paradise Lost by John Milton.

 

And that must end us, that must be our cure: To be no more. Sad cure! For who would lose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through eternity, To perish, rather, swallowed up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated night Devoid of sense and motion?

 

Output:

 

And that must end us, that must be our cure: To be no more. Sad cure! For who would lose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through eternity,
To perish, rather, swallowed up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated night Devoid of sense and motion?
Yet, even when that day does come,
It will never be wholly finished, Nor shall our love that is for ever end: Still we shall have that sweet feeling—
Of that joy not yet come!
How much this makes us think Of death!
Our eyes and our feet must ever turn To see it, To touch it, To feel it, To feel it,
So that it may be in our hearts,
That it shall not be taken away.
And so we look upon it, And know it not: The hand, the breath, The heart, the mind, It is there, It is there, Yet is seen on the other side;
And so, so, so,
In our faces and in our heart,
We feel not the touch that should touch it.
It was

 

...Interesting. I guess feeding it poetry isn't the best idea for now, it needs to work on that. :p



#67
Yuli Ban

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fdjcumi7e7k31.jpg?width=420&auto=webp&s=


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






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