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Some South Koreans are fighting job automation


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#1
funkervogt

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At a Dal.komm Coffee shop in Seoul, a robot barista takes orders remotely through a mobile app or kiosk cashier and then brews fresh coffee.

 
Less than a minute later, the robot sends a 4-digit code the customer can use to open a pick-up box. The robot can handle up to 14 drinks at a time. 

Barista jobs could have been automated with the technology of 15 years ago. I don't understand why we've been so slow to do so. 

 

 

South Korea’s minimum wage has jumped by 27.3 percent over the last two years, adding to the incentive to cut labor costs by using automation

Pay close attention, all $15 minimum wage supporters. 

 

 

Officials also revised initial plans to completely automate all the nation’s tollgates after complaints over losing 6,700 jobs. Instead, the system will be partially automated and keep all its current toll collectors.

Another example of how unions will slow the pace of job automation, costing everyone else money. I predict that public sector jobs will be automated mostly through attrition and not layoffs: Organizations like toll booth agencies will have to wait until a human leaves an obsolete job (because they quit, retire, transfer, or are fired for misbehavior) before they can automate it. 

 

https://apnews.com/c...f22cd9c8dd99e5f


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#2
Erowind

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[quote name="funkervogt" post="265272" timestamp="1559835411"][quote]

Barista jobs could have been automated with the technology of 15 years ago. I don't understand why we've been so slow to do so.

[/quote]

Read Bullshit Jobs for the answer.

[quote]

Pay close attention, all $15 minimum wage supporters.



15$ minimum wage doesn't even keep up with inflation or productivity increases. If it did it would be in the 30-40$ range now. This isn't even a leftist issue. It's just retaining wage conditions that existed in the 1960s. The Unites States had wages like this at one time. Moreover if automation is happening than the response shouldn't be to cut wages or be hostile to wages, it should be to distribute wealth that we no longer have to work for and that's what reasonable economists going back to Keynes (not even a socialist) have said for a very long time now. Perhaps instead of allowing companies to lay people off for greeds sake we mandate they still pay their employees 90% of their previous salary and reduce their hours. Firing people for automations sake should be mostly illegal.

This isn't blocking progress or getting in the way of "innovation." Letting the population fall into poverty through no fault of their own due to an irresponsible use of technology is not progress. If social concern doesn't enter the equation than consider whether or not WWII Japanese human expiriments were justified and ask the question, "when, if ever should social concern in relation to scientific and technological progress be accounted for and why?

Considering that the plan as it seems right now is to just let unemployment skyrocket into the 40-50% range and not care about the inevitable collapse of society that will follow I don't see how unions slowing automation is a bad thing. I also question who's money? I doubt you're a billionaire Funker? Your profit margins won't increase, why do you care? Capitalists price fix, they won't bring costs down with automation like I suspect you think they will. For proof research the countless cases of price fixing and even gouging in history and the current generic medication lawsuit happening in the Unites States.

#3
Alislaws

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I support higher minimum wages because​ it incentivises automation*. If we make labour super expensive, money into automation increases, and really advanced automation will break capitalism as it currently stands.

 

When we have broken capitalism by automating loads of jobs we will finally be in a position where we have the know-how and the political will to create a socialist economy of some kind, where the productivity of the robot labour is distributed to everyone fairly. This ends wage slavery, and allows for lifelong education and skill training for everyone ensuring the maximum % of people are still employed. 

 

Of course there's a chance we'll get horrible dystopian nightmare outcomes where a tiny handful of elites control the productive capacity of whole continents, and millions of people are culled because they can no longer contribute to the capitalist system. But I am naively optimistic and hope that it won't come to that. 

 

On a practical level the best thing for a country to do (long term) would be to stick a huge minimum wage in place (as high as you can go without putting all the companies out of business) this would then ensure that their nation is an absolute leader in efficiency, productivity and automation 10 years later. 

 

(*not just for this reason!)


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#4
funkervogt

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Related: 

 

 

In August 2018, the gaming giant quietly installed automated beverage systems – known as “Back of House Automated Service Bars" – at the MGM Springfield resort in Massachusetts.

 
Imagine an advanced version of the soda fountains at a Burger King or Five Guys – a metal box equipped with a touch screen and dispensing apparatus. Service workers select the drink on the screen. A tap on the screen commands the machine to precisely measure and mix liquids dispensed into a cup or glass sitting below. Each automated service bar is programmed with hundreds of drink combinations.
 
Customers never see or interact with the beverage systems. They simply order and wait for the order to arrive.
 
The technology, according to MGM, eliminates redundant human labor, allowing front of house employees to self-serve as guest’s order and reducing wait times.

 

Again, the unions are fighting a delaying action against the machines: 

 

 

In 2018, the Culinary union negotiated terms of a collective bargaining agreement that includes protections from job displacement due to automation.

 
Under this agreement, MGM and other gaming companies must notify the union six months before new technology enters the workforce to allow employees to learn new skills for new positions should machines threaten their jobs.

 

https://www.usatoday...ots/1415103001/

 

Barista jobs could be automated. 


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#5
funkervogt

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One more thing: If anyone really wants to destroy a lot of obsolete jobs in Las Vegas, they should build a metro line under Las Vegas Blvd., with the southernmost station just south of the airport, and the northernmost station just north of Fremont St. Thousands of taxi cab jobs that exist solely to transport tourists up and down the Blvd would vanish. 






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