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Better sensors (e.g. ultrasound, NIR) + Machine Learning will accelerate anti-aging research


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#1
starspawn0

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Mice are often used to determine whether certain compounds slow aging. Unfortunately, rodent physiology doesn't perfectly align with human physiology -- many disease treatments in mouse models don't transfer to humans. Primate models work better, but unfortunately they live a lot longer, and signs of aging may not be immediately visible.

Is there a way to do this a lot more quickly and accurately?

See this:

https://www.the-scie...g-process-65353

Machine Learning can determine the biological age of mice from "mug shots". Given more sensor data, such as from ultrasound, next-gen light-based (holographic) sensors, and others, they could probably do so even more accurately; and, this probably also extends to primates.

So, for example, a proposed compound to slow aging could be given to primates, and their bodies could be scanned over a period of a few weeks. Once the data are fed into a machine-learned algorithm, you get a response like, "Over the past 4 weeks, the ape's biological age only advanced by 3 weeks." The change would be too subtle for humans to notice, unless they ran the test for a period of several years.
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#2
starspawn0

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I can foresee another potential anti-aging strategy, given better medical hardware: 

 

Perhaps you are aware of work like Mary Lou Jepsen's Openwater startup is doing, to build a near-infrared imaging system, which also uses ultrasound and can focus energy at the resolution of a cell or smaller.  Jepsen has talked about how they can potentially scan at a resolution of a micron, a few centimeters into the body.  That's small enough to where, perhaps, individual dying, cancerous, or weak cells could be picked-out using computer vision algorithms; and so could pockets of gunk.  If ultrasound is focused to the same resolution, those cells and gunk could be killed or broken-up, which should make the organism healthier, if they can be efficiently eliminated from the body.

 

With enough holographic imaging elements, working in parallel perhaps 1 million cells could be scanned each second (Jepsen's estimate for brain-scanning is 100,000 voxels per second; so this is not unreasonable).  At that rate, you can scan nearly 1 trillion cells in 10 days, which is about 3% of the number in the human body.  Scan 10 million cells per second, and you can reach that in just 1 day.  

 

I imagine the efficiency of this hardware-based approach to senolytics would be much greater than you can achieve with drugs -- you'd be able to eliminate almost 100% of the bad cells, given enough scanning time.  

 

It would be funny if, contrary to expectations, this type of hardware approach  leaves drug-based methods in the dust, achieving incomparably better results.  It would be one more example of people not thinking ahead about the consequences of better sensors and other devices.


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#3
Alislaws

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I can foresee another potential anti-aging strategy, given better medical hardware: 

 

Perhaps you are aware of work like Mary Lou Jepsen's Openwater startup is doing, to build a near-infrared imaging system, which also uses ultrasound and can focus energy at the resolution of a cell or smaller.  Jepsen has talked about how they can potentially scan at a resolution of a micron, a few centimeters into the body.  That's small enough to where, perhaps, individual dying, cancerous, or weak cells could be picked-out using computer vision algorithms; and so could pockets of gunk.  If ultrasound is focused to the same resolution, those cells and gunk could be killed or broken-up, which should make the organism healthier, if they can be efficiently eliminated from the body.

 

With enough holographic imaging elements, working in parallel perhaps 1 million cells could be scanned each second (Jepsen's estimate for brain-scanning is 100,000 voxels per second; so this is not unreasonable).  At that rate, you can scan nearly 1 trillion cells in 10 days, which is about 3% of the number in the human body.  Scan 10 million cells per second, and you can reach that in just 1 day.  

 

I imagine the efficiency of this hardware-based approach to senolytics would be much greater than you can achieve with drugs -- you'd be able to eliminate almost 100% of the bad cells, given enough scanning time.  

 

It would be funny if, contrary to expectations, this type of hardware approach  leaves drug-based methods in the dust, achieving incomparably better results.  It would be one more example of people not thinking ahead about the consequences of better sensors and other devices.

If you created a full body suit with the openwater system allowing you to scan the whole body, and if you could make these suits fairly comfortable you could end up with people sitting around wearing your suit every evening after work for a couple of hours.  

 

(Ideally using the suit for BCI reasons, with the medical scanning as a cool bonus)

 

This would mean a couple of hours a day of scanning time, allowing an in depth scan of their whole body every few months.

 

I doubt you'd have a home version of the tech that was capable of killing your cells (what if it got hacked?) but your doctor could have access to your scans and use them to double check any alarms the automated scanning sets off and they could contact you in the event anything comes up.

 

You'd then be placed in a more advanced suit, and it would use your previous months of scanning data to pinpoint the problem areas and then eliminate the harmful cells. 






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