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Diet and exercise discussion

food exercise fitness health

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#1
kjaggard

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I thought it might be interesting to share discuss and explore diet and exercise routines.

 

Partly because I'm including a new category of content on my youtube channel where I explore some of these.

 

Starting Sunday I'm switching my diet over to a carbohydrate dominant diet for 4 weeks to see both how my body handles it and how it compares with protein dominant and fat dominant diets when I do those later this year. There are several week n between where I will return to a baseline routine to prevent effect of one bleeding into the time-line of another

 

The goal is 4 weeks each, same amount of calories, same fitness activity levels. Check weight, and other health indicators, possibly get some blood tests done before each.

 

So I've also planned out fitness routines for the rest of the year. Cardio dominant, Strength training, and I guess what's called power training (basically working of fast twitch, slow twitch and endurance fitness routines. 4 weeks each, with weeks in between at a baseline fitness routine to prevent overlap of results.

 

I should just about finish the year with a week off to summarize each.


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#2
starspawn0

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If you're going to build muscle, you are going to have to take in a fair amount of protein; a high-carb, low-protein diet won't work for that. The easiest way I find to do this is protein shakes. Some of them are really good, and are very low in fat and carbs. I have tried several brands -- Premier Protein isn't bad: it's mostly sugar-free, though you wouldn't guess it; it has about 30 grams of protein per serving, about 5 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fat. The protein is from milk and whey, and so is complete. Muscle Milk also isn't bad, and has a little more protein per serving, but I don't know that it includes a whey source; Isotech/Bodytech42 has 42g protein per serving, and has an awful taste.

My diet is basically an "intermittent fasting" diet of 2 meals per day, in the time slot 9 am to 3:30 pm (fasting the remaining 17.5 hours of the day). I used to do 8 am to 4 pm, but moved it closer to the middle of the day. There is some evidence that Intermittent Fasting diets like this are much easier to stay on than traditional diets; and, there is evidence that it slows vascular aging -- and comes with lots of health benefits, like preventing diabetes, heart disease, and other afflictions.

I am usually pretty careful about what I eat, and try to keep it as healthy as possible -- which includes, for example, salads with trout fillet; I try to get at least 3 portions of fish in each week.

I also take vitamins and supplements -- partly to address any potential nutrient shortcomings, and also to slow aging as much as possible.

As to exercises, I do a fair amount of walking each day (over an hour per day; often over 2 hours); sometimes I jog or run -- but prefer to just walk, while listening to music. It does wonders for pulse and blood pressure -- I have an "athletic" resting pulse rate (below 60 bpm), and my blood pressure is normal without medication.

I do strength training most days -- some days I skip. I do a combination of (alternating muscle groups):

* Bicep curls -- it's important to get the twist. I usually do several several sets, with several reps, with two 45 pound dumbells in each arm.

* Bench press. I sometimes use sitting Nautilus; sometimes use a barbell on a track (I don't like having people to spot for me). I usually bench press near to 200 pounds. I realize some people do 250 or more -- but 200 is good enough for me.

* I do cruches with 2 20-pound dumbells (ordinary situps and crunches are too easy without resistance).

* Cables to works pecs.

* Triceps and shoulder Nautilus machines.

* I use the "Captain's Chair" for more abdominal work.

* I used to do squats with 2 50-pound dumbells; but have switched to a leg machine, which I think works those muscles better.

* Sometimes I do lots of bicycle crunches.

* Sometimes I do triangle pushups to work triceps.

And a few more...

I work about maybe 30 minutes a day lifting weights. It was easier when I was younger, when I lifted maybe 1 hour per day.

One more thing: one has to be careful about overworking the muscles. They need time to repair from each exercise session; or else one won't gain muscle mass.

#3
Archimedes

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I've been more mindful about when I'm actually hungry vs when I just want to stick food in my mouth for no reason.

 

I think I've begun losing weight as a result, not sure yet though.



#4
zEVerzan

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Ah, a good thread to have.

 

I'd always been very trim - svelte even, no matter what I ate or how much.

However it's only been in the last few months that I've been able to work out on the reg, the house I moved into has a home gym in the basement and sometimes my housemate and I work out together. He's like 11 years older than me but really tall, built and cut. I benefit greatly from his experience because I'm doing routines now that took him years to figure out on his own.

I've been making gains and now have a reason to be proud of my body. Lifting does wonders for your mental health and the results give confidence.


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#5
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I've lost 12 pounds this month by just actively trying to reduce my caloric consumption and increase my protein intake. Depending on my body composition and overall look I may lose 10 more pounds. 


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#6
starspawn0

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This is interesting:

https://edition.cnn....-grm/index.html

Spinach chemical should be put on doping ban list, say researchers

....

A study released by Freie Universitat Berlin suggests that ecdysterone, a chemical found in the leafy green vegetable, has a similar effect to steroids and should be added to the list of substances banned in sport, CNN affiliate RTL reported.

The researchers ran a study involving 46 athletes who trained three times per week for 10 weeks. Some were given ecdysterone and others a placebo.

Those who took ecdysterone saw their performance improve by three times as much as those who did not.



The study is too small to draw any conclusions, but the effect appears to be strong and less likely to be a statistical aberration -- so might actually be true.

So... spinach likely contains a compound that, when concentrated, acts as an anabolic steroid.

#7
kjaggard

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If you're going to build muscle, you are going to have to take in a fair amount of protein; a high-carb, low-protein diet won't work for that. The easiest way I find to do this is protein shakes...

One more thing: one has to be careful about overworking the muscles. They need time to repair from each exercise session; or else one won't gain muscle mass.

 

I've not fallen into the mindset that so many men seem to, thinking that mOrE MuScLe is the best muscle. I'm not interested in being bulked out and some ripped hulk look alike.

 

I favor utility and versatility over size and aesthetic. Flexibility, speed, endurance, skill (understanding leverage and other knowledge based approaches to physical performance) are more important to me. I cannot tell you the number of swole bros I've known who for all their size and definition were weaker then the scrappy twerp they sneered at.

 

I've been built like a quarterback, a sumo wrestler, and a human skeleton at various times in my life due to health conditions out of my control. It's been within the last decade that I've been able to gain some of the knowledge to exert some degree of control. I've been healthier than I ever  was (chronic immune health flairs aside) and I've grown more comfortable with being the tall slender person that I am, and don't buy the gym bro mentality trying to pressure me to work on bulking out and definition. That's fine if people want that, that is no more suited to me than looking like Gwyneth Paltrow should be what Anne Hathaway should strive for.

 

I have my baseline fitness routine founded mostly on body weight exercises and circuit training approaches. My base diet is largely vegetables, and lean protein. While part of this experiment is to more substancially document how my body responds to the different macro nutrient balances, but also in part a response to all the silly advice so many people give you about their food based religions. As somebody whose body has been all over the map and has had so many different dietary routines to manage things, I get a bit annoyed with some of the constant unsolicited 'consultations' (you need a more alkali diet, you should be completely organic, go plant based because meat is killing you, ...). 


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#8
kjaggard

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This is interesting:

https://edition.cnn....-grm/index.html
 

Spinach chemical should be put on doping ban list, say researchers

....

A study released by Freie Universitat Berlin suggests that ecdysterone, a chemical found in the leafy green vegetable, has a similar effect to steroids and should be added to the list of substances banned in sport, CNN affiliate RTL reported.

The researchers ran a study involving 46 athletes who trained three times per week for 10 weeks. Some were given ecdysterone and others a placebo.

Those who took ecdysterone saw their performance improve by three times as much as those who did not.



The study is too small to draw any conclusions, but the effect appears to be strong and less likely to be a statistical aberration -- so might actually be true.

So... spinach likely contains a compound that, when concentrated, acts as an anabolic steroid.

 

some more interesting look at ecdysterone  http://examine.com/s...s/ecdysteroids/


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#9
Erowind

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Calorie counting and running are the kings of pure weight loss. I went from 230lbs to 165lbs in about a year by running 7 miles every other day and eating a few hundred fewer calories than needed to maintain by bodyweight. Don't over calorie count though, starving yourself just makes the body go into survival mode which causes you to be lethargic and keep on the weight.

Bodyweight fitness is also great if you can't afford a gym membership. Wish I lived in the city not the suburbs sometimes. The Polish Hill public gym is a 5$ no contract monthly membership.

#10
kjaggard

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My current exercise routine I'm doing for a video I'm making is a bit intense.

 

10 different body weight exercises that use different muscle groups, done every hour or half hour, for a different number or reps, depending on if it's a heavy day or light day.

 

you can easily trick yourself into thinking the workout is too easy and you should be doing more reps each time. But  doing it over time like this keeps an lightly elevated heart rate and breathing through more of the day, gets more reps per day with less muscle fatigue and burn out, and lower risk of injury. You are still going to totally feel it by day 4.

 

update: yeesh, nothing like doing 200 each squats, pushups, jumping jacks and seven other body weight exercises in high heat and humidity to make you truly happy to finish the last one of the day.


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#11
kjaggard

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I've got to say that I'm impressed with how much my body is able to do without wrecking myself.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
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Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#12
starspawn0

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It's worth mentioning Electrical Muscle Stimulation, which isn't snake-oil:

https://www.popsci.c...orkout-science/

There are several small, but promising studies about its usefulness. For example, it has been shown to cause older men (much older than me, say) to gain muscle mass, when done in combination with exercise -- even as regular exercise alone doesn't do it for them. And for younger men, the combination of EMS and basic strength training is better than either one alone. So, it's kind of like a "performance enhancing drug" in terms of its overall effect -- yet just requires some electrodes and a simple circuit.

#13
starspawn0

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Here is a Huffington Post piece on it:

https://www.huffpost...4b0abcb02ce2255

Mention is made of how the Soviet Union used EMS to good effect in the 1970s to improve the performance of athletes.

There's a more modern, much more intense version called EMsculpt. It works by directing electromagnetic energy into the muscles to stimulate contractions, and both slow and fast twitch muscle development. It is one way to give people that "six-pack abs" look without much effort -- just about 4 sessions is enough to do the trick in non-overweight people (both men and women).

#14
kjaggard

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I did 4 weeks of carb dominant diet and discovered that by week 4 I literally had trouble calculating how many days 3 full weeks and sunday to wednesday came out to. Every time I was talking about a project I would digress and go off on tangents every few minutes and then forget where I was going when I started. I was hungry all the damn time even when consuming enough calories for my size and activity level and my sleep was disrupted.

 

I hated it toward the end. And while at what my calorie count should have been the whole time I gained 15 pounds in 4 weeks. While given my digestive ailment that can make me lose weight when I flair and I tend toward underweight, this is valuble to know a way to put on weight when I need to buuut... wtf.  why would the same or fewer calories than I would normally need, cause me to gain weight when it's carbs rather than my usual diet (actually it's likely the combination of water retention and the fact that carbs increase insulin production which can increase energy storage in adipose tissues, thus making one fatter, but geeze I was surprised to see the degree to which this occured).

 

Now back on my standard diet of eggs, meat and veg mostly with a few carbs on a rare occasion.

 

switched to a new exercise routine to try for 4 weeks. a stationary bike, starting out with hourly short rounds of low resistance medium speed. Hoping to achieve a vastly increased endurance to steady long spans of activity.


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#15
starspawn0

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A Wall Street Journal piece about "Intermittent Fasting" (say, only eating in a narrow sliver of time each day; and not eating more than 14 hours each day):

https://www.wsj.com/...fad-11564676512

It mentions evidence from lab animals and a few human trials that it helps fight: diabetes, weight gain, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis, liver disease, pancreatic disease, and cancer; in many cases, the effect is very large. Furthermore, there is evidence that it improves cognitive functioning, and also autophagy, which is the body's own natural senolytics. In combination with NAD+ boosters (like Nicotinamide Riboside) and/or protein-restriction, it may have a powerful anti-aging effect.

As I've said before, I do intermittent fasting -- eating all my meals (usually just 2) in about a 6 to 7 hour sliver of time each day. I have found, though, that it leaves me dehydrated -- you have to force yourself to drink more water, if you drop one meal per day (you consume liquids naturally and easily with meals; but if you don't eat one, then you have to find a way to fill that "hydration gap"). I also usually drink a protein shake, to make sure I get adequate protein (dropping one meal also drops protein intake).

Intermittent fasting is a lot easier to pull off that most people imagine. If one starts slow -- say, reducing the size of one meal until it's gone -- and then moves the remaining meals closer and closer to the same time of day, one can reprogram ones body to where one won't get hungry, while making the fasting a "habit", part of ones daily routine. Once one has done that, it actually takes effort not to fast -- it just feels weird to eat outside of those special hours.

But, of course, I'm speaking about people with average human physiology. This might not apply to people with autoimmune disorders, metabolic disorders, and even psychosomatic disorders.

(I am reminded of how, when giving lectures to a large class in which I use the word "you", and what is said after applies to 98% of the class, but not to one or two precocious students. The precocious student [sometimes borderline autistic or "different" in some way, but brilliant] thinks I've just made an error, and gets nonplussed about my making assumptions about "them". Ahhh, but they are blissfully unaware that I've not; and that it's just more expedient not to be too nuanced in the message.)

#16
kjaggard

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I've done various kinds of fasting, mostly accidentally, and frankly there are time it's easier to just not eat than to only eat a little. I would rather skip eating for a whole day than to get 1 sandwich 16 hours after the last meal, and then not eat for another 16. 


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#17
tomasth

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I found starspawn0 comment about hydration odd , because I always drink off meals.

kjaggard , yes its like one finally start eating only to immediately stop.

I got a stomach flu last week after taking protein shake , I thought I went bad or something at first.
I will have wait awhile before trying a small amount to make sure the protein is safe.

#18
kjaggard

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well me newest addition to my routine was to increase the endurance for constant pedaling of a bike. I applied a modified version of my improvement strategy and... I've managed a greater than 10x improvement in less than 4 weeks.

 

I've got the next 6 weeks to consolidate things down to make room for the next round. Strength training, followed by power training in november. I'm hoping for a 10x improvement in each and then to shift them from improvement to maintaining routines that I can do daily on a more managable schedule.

 

I'm also already thinking of modfying the improvement strategy to apply it for a month toward flexibility and speed. I wonder if I'm missing anything else, as I prefer things in sets of 3, lol. Maybe I should settle for the five set of endurance, strength, power, speed, and flexibility.


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#19
kjaggard

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well I consolidated down to a reasonable time investment while maintaining the exercise level.

 

Today was the start of Keto 4 week trial. according to my size, and activity levels I should be getting 2800-3200 calories a day. I ate breakfast. Later did a taste test of a keto meal bar, had half a large bag of pork rinds, and two scrambled eggs with cheese even later in the day. I've not been hungry at all today.

 

I sat down to calculate what my caloric intake has been today... 980. WTF? how the absolute crap am I supposed to triple that before I go to bed in a couple hours? This is stupid. I gotta figure something out.

 

Maybe swap out one meal for two salads drenched in old and vinegar? Not even sure that would cut it.


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Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#20
kjaggard

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I've adapted to keto. still don't care for the heavy oil and grease dullness in the food. also backed off the fitness routine to be at comparable levels to what I was doing during carbs, to give each a fair measure. 

 

on the 22, I will be starting a fast twitch muscle based workout, I think. largely it will consist of jumps, and stuff like kick boxing, as things the use explosive output over short periods of time.


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Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
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