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Is pursuing BCI tech even worthwhile anymore?

neuralink future of neurotech

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6 replies to this topic

#1
archer

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With the recent presentation released by Neuralink which claimed they had a min. 100x improvement over the best current Utah array approved by FDA plus the fact that other companies like Kernel,etc. funded and backed by very smart people is making me question the viability of a new player entering the BCI market (making devices very close to what Neuralink and Kernel are working on).

Like if all the new advancements are gonna come from these huge teams richly funded and supported by the top researchers from elite universities, why should a new entrant even bother since it's gonna take much effort just to catch up with these companies?

 

I desperately wanna work on neurotech and mind uploading as a career path, but these announcements are just depressing to someone who'd rather start a neurotech company (but great news for someone who wants to work at these companies since their scope and scale is just going to exponentially increase over time)

 

Or maybe I just have incomplete information as well as a incomplete picture of the neurotech landscape of the future. Anyone wanna chime in?



#2
waitingforthe2020s

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It wouldn't hurt to try, I'd believe. Not everything will be developed by only one company.


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I'm a radical demo-publiacrat.

 

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#3
Zaphod

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I think it is very premature to think that the BCI tech market is saturated before it is even a thing yet. We are barely at the embryonic stage for BCI tech. It is going to take a long time with many new rising and falling players involved in its development. Many startups will come up with alternative solutions that rival these bigger companies products in certain ways. Most will fail, some will succeed. I'm sure there are many approaches for neural interfaces which nobody has thought of yet, or will only become apparent when new complementary technology emerges. The first-movers like Neuralink and CTRL-Labs may seem like they have pulled ahead at this early stage, but they are still small companies in the grand scheme of things and there is a lot of potential for rivals to supersede them. Overall, I would argue that the ground is very fertile for BCI startups. But as is the nature of startups in all new industries, most of them will fail in the long term. 


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#4
Alislaws

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Yeah, there is still everything to play for in this space but you'd need big backers, or very smart founders for your company to compete with some of the players already in the game (Facebook for example has All Of The MoneyTM‚Äč) And Neuralink and open water have various combinations of smart people and backing, as well as a big head start. 



#5
Maximum7

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It could be very dangerous......

#6
archer

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I think it is very premature to think that the BCI tech market is saturated before it is even a thing yet. We are barely at the embryonic stage for BCI tech. It is going to take a long time with many new rising and falling players involved in its development. Many startups will come up with alternative solutions that rival these bigger companies products in certain ways. Most will fail, some will succeed. I'm sure there are many approaches for neural interfaces which nobody has thought of yet, or will only become apparent when new complementary technology emerges. The first-movers like Neuralink and CTRL-Labs may seem like they have pulled ahead at this early stage, but they are still small companies in the grand scheme of things and there is a lot of potential for rivals to supersede them. Overall, I would argue that the ground is very fertile for BCI startups. But as is the nature of startups in all new industries, most of them will fail in the long term. 

I still have a ways to go about studying BCI tech, and was just worried about far more resourceful people having the first mover advantage (like Tesla has with self driving data or SpaceX with reusability over Blue Origin or Boeing). Frankly I only got concerned after Musk announced Neuralink, since he's known to get important stuff done quickly.

But like you said this is a very nascent market and we don't even know how it's gonna pan out, so plenty of room for startups down the line. Plus the involvement of companies like Neuralink, Kernel and Openwater will only boost the credibility of this market in front of VCs and such, as well as research interest from universities, esp. on the West Coast thus further advancing the research for startups to scoop up later on.

Thanks for the well thought out response.



#7
Alislaws

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...

I still have a ways to go about studying BCI tech, and was just worried about far more resourceful people having the first mover advantage (like Tesla has with self driving data or SpaceX with reusability over Blue Origin or Boeing). Frankly I only got concerned after Musk announced Neuralink, since he's known to get important stuff done quickly.

But like you said this is a very nascent market and we don't even know how it's gonna pan out, so plenty of room for startups down the line. Plus the involvement of companies like Neuralink, Kernel and Openwater will only boost the credibility of this market in front of VCs and such, as well as research interest from universities, esp. on the West Coast thus further advancing the research for startups to scoop up later on.

Thanks for the well thought out response.

 

Even aside from hardware development, maybe you could be a software developer working with hardware developed by these companies? And of course the main purpose of the recent neuralink announcement was recruitment so...

 

A whole industry will build up around BCI tech, and there will eventually be lots of niches which don't involve competing with facebook on hardware development. 

 

If you're still learning now you might find yourself in massive demand in a few years if any of these companies find major success, You'll be in demand like good data scientists and machine earning experts are now.







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