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Direct Air Capture (DAC)

carbon carbon capture direct air capture climate climate change global warming pollution peter diamandis

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#1
wjfox

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Excellent blog by Peter Diamandis, well worth a read.

 

In recent years, I've become resigned to our apparent fate regarding climate change, but this article offers some hope.

 

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Direct Air Capture & the Carbon Revolution

Imagine making fuel, plastics, and concrete out of “thin air." That’s the promise of Direct Air Capture (DAC), a technology that fundamentally disrupts our contemporary oil economy.

Mimicking what already occurs in nature, DAC essentially involves industrial photosynthesis, harnessing the power of the sun to draw carbon directly out of the atmosphere.

This captured carbon can then be turned into numerous consumer goods, spanning fuels, plastics, aggregates and concrete (as I write this blog, I’m even wearing shoes 3D-printed from carbon).

A vital component of every life form on Earth, carbon stands at the core of our manufacturing, energy, transportation, among the world’s highest-valued industries.

And in the coming 10 years, sourcing carbon out of the air will become more cost-effective than carbon sourced from the ground (oil).

By 2030, the carbon capture and utilization (CCU) industry is expected to reach $800 billion. And by 2050, that number will surge more than 4X to a $4 Trillion market, according to McKinsey.

 

Read moreL https://www.diamandi...ect-air-capture



#2
Erowind

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The only company I've seen do it right is climeworks. They are using geothermal (a completely renewable energy source) to sequester carbon and pumping its solidified rock form into geologically stable rock in the Earths crust. Consumer culture needs to stop because we actively need to remove carbon, not suck it up and re burn it/turn it into consumer product. Even without global warming we are well on our way to ecosystem collapse due to human land usage and pollution (much of which is plastic.) We need to use less and degrow. The only viable solution is degrowth coupled with careful use of geoengineering.

Sucking up carbon only to turn it into plastics while better than extracting oil will still slowly kill us. We went nearly our entire history without plastics, barring some scientific, construction and medical usage we don't need it. We especially don't need to package things with it. Sucking up carbon only to re burn it is not only a net-loss of energy where the yeild costs more to extract than its worth but doesn't solve global warming because carbon levels are already too high. We've already passed the tipping point where warming still happens even if we somehow stopped all emissions tomorrow.

I'm not trying to be a downer. But reuse of carbon is not a magic bullet, it must be removed from the environment.

#3
Mr.posthuman

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It should be used to create biosugar (bioglucose) biodegradable bioplastics instead of using agriculture farmland to extract bioglucose to create biodegradable bioplastic from plants and trees (like sugar cane )

#4
Mr.posthuman

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Scientists already had invented a artificial leafs that absorb 100 times more co2 than natural leafs

#5
Mr.posthuman

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It can save more farmland used to create biodegradable bioplastic for use in food instead

#6
Mr.posthuman

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And create sugars and alcohols and other things also

#7
caltrek

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This  (see below) is an article I found in Vox that discusses carbon capture and use including direct  air capture.  While it goes beyond just direct air capture, I thought this thread was a close match. It is a rather long article compared to most articles that I present, but worth the read for those interested in the technologies in question.

 

https://www.vox.com/...ion-storage-ccu

 

A Summary of Five Uses in Bullet Form:

  1. Concrete building materials – see article for extended discussion
  2. Liquid fuels – see article for extended discussion
  3. Chemicals and plastics - Using various catalysts, CO2 can be made into a variety of chemical intermediaries — materials that then serve as feedstocks in other industrial processes, like methanol, syngas, and formic acid.
  4. Algae - Captured CO2 can be used to accelerate the growth of algae, which has the capacity to absorb much more of it, much faster, than any other source of biomass. And algae is uniquely useful. It can serve as feedstock for food, biofuels, plastics, and even carbon fiber (see No. 5).
  5. Novel materials - CO2 can be made into high-performance materials — carbon composites, carbon fiber, graphene — that could conceivably substitute for a whole range of materials, from metals to concrete.

All five are discussed in more detail in the linked article.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#8
funkervogt

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Everything will be OK.  :bye:







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: carbon, carbon capture, direct air capture, climate, climate change, global warming, pollution, peter diamandis

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