Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

The Future of Insects

Insects Pesticides Extinction Ecology Environment

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts

Full disclosure:  I was once a volunteer activist for what became a local chapter of the Pesticide Action Network.

 

There has been enough media buzz about this issue lately that I think it deserves its own thread.

 

We also have a thread on Mosquitos:

 

https://www.futureti...5287-mosquitos/

 

Articles, comments, and discussion narrowly focused on mosquitos should be made to that thread.

 

Conservationist Warns 'Unnoticed Apocalypse' of Insects 'Should Set Alarms Ringing'

 

https://www.commondr...-alarms-ringing

 

Introduction:

 

(Common Dreams) Conservationists on Wednesday called for immediate action by governments, industries, and the public to address a decades-long, human-caused insect "apocalypse" detailed in a new report and warned of the sweeping, serious consequences of inaction.

 

Insect Declines and Why They Matter (pdf) was commissioned by an alliance of The Wildlife Trusts in the United Kingdom and authored by University of Sussex biology professor Dave Goulsondescribed by The Guardian as "one of the U.K.'s leading ecologists."

 

"Insects make up the bulk of known species on Earth and are integral to the functioning of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, performing vital roles such as pollination, seed dispersal, and nutrient cycling. They are also food for numerous larger animals, including birds, bats, fish, amphibians, and lizards," Goulson said in a statement Wednesday. "If we don't stop the decline of our insects, there will be profound consequences for all life on Earth."

 

The report's executive summary says that over that past 50 years, "we have reduced the abundance of wildlife on Earth dramatically." Although "much attention focuses on declines of large, charismatic animals," the report continues, "recent evidence suggests that abundance of insects may have fallen by 50% or more since 1970."

 

Recent findings on insect declines driven by habitat loss and pesticide use are "troubling" because "if insect declines are not halted, terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems will collapse," the report explains. Underscoring the need for action, the report warns that 41% of the planet's five million insect species are "threatened with extinction."

 

 

 

 

Edit:  "Media buzz" - no pun intended.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#2
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,379 posts
  • LocationLondon

Just my two cents.

 

1. Eating insects (bred in captivity) will become a lot more popular.

 

2. Insects in the wild will continue to decline, until there's a radical improvement in agriculture, pesticides and general pollution, which I don't foresee happening until at least 2050.



#3
zEVerzan

zEVerzan

    Orange Animating Android

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,743 posts
  • LocationSome Underground Sweatshop Probably

What about using CRISPR to eradicate malaria? I remember hearing about that a few years ago but I still don't really understand it.

 

What about bedbugs? They were just an intrinsic aspect of human existence since we lived in caves and they evolved from the batbugs that once fed on the bats. Suddenly in the 40s DDT and other horrid pesticides nearly wiped them out, but they're coming back stronger n nastier than ever, globally. I doubt eradicating them again would have any adverse effect on the ecosystem but the question is how?


I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
Attention is currency in the "free marketplace of ideas".
I do other stuff besides gripe about the future! Twitter Youtube DeviantArt +-PATREON-+

#4
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,379 posts
  • LocationLondon

 

What about using CRISPR to eradicate malaria? I remember hearing about that a few years ago but I still don't really understand it.

 

Yes, there's an effort underway known as "gene drives".

 

See: 2029 – Mass application of gene drives on mosquitoes



#5
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts

Holland covers hundreds of bus stops with plants as gift to honeybees

 

https://www.independ...FWAQj4noQihEjb8

 

Introduction:

 

(Independent) The roofs of hundreds of bus stops have been covered in plants as a gift to honeybee, by a city in the Netherlands. 

 

Mainly made up of sedum plants, a total of 316 have been covered in greenery in Utrecht

 

The shelters not only support the city’s biodiversity, such as honey bees and bumblebees, but they also help capture fine dust and store rainwater.

 

The roofs are looked after by workers who drive around in electric vehicles, and the bus stops have all been fitted with energy-efficient LED lights and bamboo benches.

 

They are just one of a number of measures Utrecht has introduced in a bid to improve air quality.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#6
CyberMisterBeauty

CyberMisterBeauty

    The most beautiful male in the universe

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 576 posts
  • LocationThe largest city of the year 2192,celebrating my 200th birthday

Just my two cents.

 

1. Eating insects (bred in captivity) will become a lot more popular.

 

2. Insects in the wild will continue to decline, until there's a radical improvement in agriculture, pesticides and general pollution, which I don't foresee happening until at least 2050.

 

Doyou think it will become popular to use genetic engineering to create insects as large as in pre historic times and use robotic technology to create large insect pets?



#7
zEVerzan

zEVerzan

    Orange Animating Android

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,743 posts
  • LocationSome Underground Sweatshop Probably

If they were robots, they wouldn't be insects, would they.

 

The reason there were hawk-sized dragonflies and SUV-sized millipedes for a time is because there was just a stupid amount of oxygen in the atmosphere (maybe 50%? Don't quote me on that) that could sustain animals with book lungs efficiently. If you tried to make bugs that big again they would probably suffocate.


I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
Attention is currency in the "free marketplace of ideas".
I do other stuff besides gripe about the future! Twitter Youtube DeviantArt +-PATREON-+

#8
That-Guy

That-Guy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 57 posts

I will not eat bugs.

 

I will not live in a pod.



#9
zEVerzan

zEVerzan

    Orange Animating Android

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,743 posts
  • LocationSome Underground Sweatshop Probably
Ok, boomer

More for the rest of us.
I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
Attention is currency in the "free marketplace of ideas".
I do other stuff besides gripe about the future! Twitter Youtube DeviantArt +-PATREON-+

#10
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts

I am kind of with That-Guy on this one.  I am also, in part, a libertarian, so if that is good for the rest of you I have no problem with that.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#11
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,087 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

I will not eat bugs.

I admit that insects sound disgusting since I've never eaten one willingly, and there is a statistic that says that if you haven't eaten something by age 25, you'll almost certainly never eat it. 

 

 

BUT, I do think we exaggerate our aversion to insects as food, because we regularly consume a type of creature very closely related to insects (hint: they are both arthropods and one could somewhat accurately consider these creatures to be "sea bugs"). Being from Louisiana, I can vouch for the deliciousness of crustaceans.

Shrimp, crawfish (who are even called "mudbugs" down here), crabs, lobsters, and whatnot have no cultural distance from food. 

Non-Western societies regularly eat insects, so there's no innate revulsion to them. It's just a matter of culture. It's not going to change quick enough before we can simply grow any meat we want, but I at least know it could theoretically change given enough time and coordinated effort.

 

But this is probably a better fit for the Future of Food thread.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#12
zEVerzan

zEVerzan

    Orange Animating Android

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,743 posts
  • LocationSome Underground Sweatshop Probably

You ever had those mexican roasted grasshoppers, fresh? They taste a lot like shrimp. Seasoning makes it pop. It's not all bad- if you flat-out refuse to try anything new your brain probably has the texture of a cue ball since it's never made a wrinkle


I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
Attention is currency in the "free marketplace of ideas".
I do other stuff besides gripe about the future! Twitter Youtube DeviantArt +-PATREON-+

#13
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts

'Consistent With a Mass Extinction': New Study Warns Climate Chaos Driving Rapid Decline of Bumblebees

 

https://www.commondr...g-rapid-decline

 

Introduction:

 

(Common Dreams) The rising frequency of extremely hot temperatures tied to human-caused global heating is creating "climate chaos" that drives widespread declines of bumblebees, some of the planet's most important pollinators, according to a new study published in the journal Science.

 

Researchers at the University of Ottawa in Canada and University College London in the United Kingdom developed a new measurement of temperature based on species' heat tolerance. "We have created a new way to predict local extinctions that tells us, for each species individually, whether climate change is creating temperatures that exceed what the bumblebees can handle," explained study co-author Tim Newbold.

 

The team applied their technique to data on 66 different bumblebee species across North America and Europe collected from 1901 to 1974 and 2000 to 2014. They concluded that more frequent extreme heat "is increasing local extinction rates, reducing colonization and site occupancy, and decreasing species richness within a region, independent of land-use change or condition."

 

"We found that populations were disappearing in areas where the temperatures had gotten hotter," said the study's lead author, Peter Soroye. "Using our new measurement of climate change, we were able to predict changes both for individual species and for whole communities of bumblebees with a surprisingly high accuracy."

 

The researchers found that the rate at which bumblebees are declining is "consistent with a mass extinction." Over the course of a single human generation, the chances of a local bumblebee population surviving has fallen by an average of more than 30%. Soroye noted that the findings have implications for more than just the bees.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#14
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,135 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

 

I will not eat bugs.

... and there is a statistic that says that if you haven't eaten something by age 25, you'll almost certainly never eat it. 

 

 

 

I've tried more new foods, and more new things since I was 30, than I did in all the time between birth and 30. I can't decide if I'm an outlier and the majority of humanity is just that sadly boring, or that statistic is full of crap.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#15
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts

‘Bee-washing’ Hurts Bees and Misleads Consumers

 

https://theconversat...onsumers-131188

 

Introduction:

(The Conversation) Amid the worry over the loss of honey bees, a far quieter but just as devastating loss is occurring among lesser known native bee populations. Wild native bees are vital to pollinate plants. Their populations are declining due to a warming climate, pesticide poisoning and lack of flowers and other environmental pressures.

 

As awareness increases about native bee death, some companies are taking advantage of public concern by touting their products as bee-friendly or making other claims. This marketing strategy, called bee-washing by critics, uses the plight of bees to mislead consumers. While many people are worried about honey bees, it’s also important to understand the jeopardy that native bees face.

 

My research explores the impact of a changing climate, specifically on the foraging behavior of native bees in Seattle public parks. More and more of my time is spent talking to the general public across the country about the dangers of bee-washing and the critical issues around bee decline.

 

Bees as a branding tool

 

Bee-washing is a term coined by researchers at York University in 2015 describing the use of bees by retailers to mislead consumers. Bee-washing is a form of greenwashing, a description conceived by environmentalists to define a marketing spin that persuades the public to think that a product is environmentally friendly. Examples of greenwashing may include green packaging or the term clean coal to deflect attention from a highly polluting process. Charlotte de Keyzer, a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto, created a website, bee-washing.com, to draw attention to bee-related marketing practices and document examples of how bees are mischaracterized for profit.

 

 Conclusion:

Be wary of products that will “save the bees.” Pay attention to which bee species advertisers are trying to save. But the absolute best thing you can do for the bees? Get out there and start learning about them. Pay attention to bees so you can identify them correctly. Plant a few flowers, see what bees show up, and find a bee cheat sheet to help identify each bee.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#16
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,361 posts
Earth's insect population shrinks 27 percent in 30 years

 

https://www.nbcnews....-years-n1191516

 

Introduction:

(AP) KENSINGTON, Maryland — The world has lost more than one quarter of its land-dwelling insects in the past 30 years, according to researchers whose big picture study of global bug decline paints a disturbing but more nuanced problem than earlier research.

 

From bees and other pollinators crucial to the world’s food supply to butterflies that beautify places, the bugs are disappearing at a rate of just under 1 percent a year, with lots of variation from place to place, according to a study in Thursday’s journal Science.

 

That’s a tinier population decline than found by some smaller localized studies, which had triggered fears of a so-called insect apocalypse. But it still adds up to something “awfully alarming,” said entomologist Roel van Klink of the German Centre for Integrative Biology, the study’s lead author.

 

“The decline across insect orders on land is jaw dropping,” said Michigan State University butterfly expert Nick Haddad, who wasn’t part of the study. “Ongoing decline on land at this rate will be catastrophic for ecological systems and for humans. Insects are pollinators, natural enemies of pests, decomposers and besides that, are critical to functioning of all Earth’s ecosystems.”

 

Insect declines are worst in North America, especially the Midwestern United States, and in parts of Europe, but the drop appears to be leveling off in the U.S. in recent years, said the study that pulled together earlier research on more than 10,000 species with data from 1,676 locations.

 

SLU75VZHIBEL5ILON5X3F6CFAA.jpg

 

Bees and other pollinators are crucial to the world's food supply.

Photo / AP as shown in: https://www.nzherald...jectid=12327351


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Insects, Pesticides, Extinction, Ecology, Environment

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users