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This Radio Telescope Could Detect Extraterrestrial Airports


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10 replies to this topic

#1
alfa015

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As some of you probably know, the Square Kilometre Array will become the biggest radio telescope on Earth, with a collecting area of 1 square kilometre.

 

The construction will start in 2021 and the first light is expected to take place in 2027.

 

It will cover the frequencies from 50 MHz to 15 Ghz. But what I wanted to share with you guys is a new study about how far the SKA can 'listen'.

 

A recent study points out that the SKA could detect extraterrestrial airport radars 200 light years away.

 

Source: https://www.youtube....h?v=ayqyb8XCtE0

 

What do you guys think?


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#2
funkervogt

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This means that any advanced aliens within 60 light years of Earth can detect our radar emissions. 



#3
Cloned

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Unfortunately, there are no nearby civilizations.
It would be a huge achievement if we could find any form of life outside the Earth.



#4
funkervogt

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Unfortunately, there are no nearby civilizations.

We don't know that for sure. Advanced alien civilizations could be in our neighboring star systems, but hidden from us thanks to technology. 



#5
Cloned

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We don't know that for sure. Advanced alien civilizations could be in our neighboring star systems, but hidden from us thanks to technology. 

 

Impossible. There is no chance that a neighboring civilization will not go unnoticed.
There is also no chance that advanced civilizations can simultaneously develop in close proximity to each other.

Perhaps we are alone in the entire Universe, which is very good.


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#6
Marblocks

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We don't know that for sure. Advanced alien civilizations could be in our neighboring star systems, but hidden from us thanks to technology. 

 

Impossible. There is no chance that a neighboring civilization will not go unnoticed.
There is also no chance that advanced civilizations can simultaneously develop in close proximity to each other.

Perhaps we are alone in the entire Universe, which is very good.

 

What do you mean it's very good?



#7
Cloned

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That means the whole universe is made for us. Unless you want to meet advanced arachnids that would use us for reproduction.
Ask Indians and Africans what happens when civilizations collide (bearing in mind that we are the same species in this case). Or ask horses and fur animals  :nyam: .


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#8
TSM

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Unfortunately, there are no nearby civilizations.
It would be a huge achievement if we could find any form of life outside the Earth.

You don't know there are no nearby civilizations.  It's completely possible that there could be a civilization of similar advancement to us only 100 light years away.  Which on a cosmic scale is very close, but given current technology we wouldn't be able to detect each other for another few decades. 



#9
Yuli Ban

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I'm gonna have to agree with Cloned on this one. The chance for another alien civilization to exist so close to us is downright asinine. It's easy to make a statement using the retroactive historical conjuncture that led to our civilization & extrapolating this to other worlds, but you really must think of it in much, much more ancient terms.

It's not just "there's a chance that there are other civilizations equivalent to ours within galactic skipping distance of us just because they probably have life & liquid water."

It's that there has to have been planets suitable for life that also developed multicellular life in such a proportion that land/semi-aquatic animals with multiple gripping appendages evolved far enough to develop sapience and had the exact right environmental pressures to push them towards advanced tool usage & language to give them the opportunity to develop organized civilizations along a specific set of biomes that develop in a specific way that eventually leads to these animals developing & using radio technology for a long enough period of time that their transmissions are noticeable. 

 

You can fudge the probabilities in many different ways: maybe this planet's life developed dominant pseudo-mammalia before xeno-reptiles evolved; maybe it's a superhabitable planet that has always been "optimal" for sapient life (which might backfire for a variety of reasons); maybe a non-humanoid creature similar to a corvid developed opposable thumbs... But there are 10,000ways it all could've gone horribly, horribly wrong at any point in their planet's history. 

 

It all went horribly right in ours, and yet we're still not out of the woods until we reach a safe Singularity scenario. It's possible that something playing out differently 1,000 years ago (like a single peasant losing instead of winning a drunken tavern bet somewhere in the ass-end of Germany) wound up leading to humanity dying off in the 1800s from some super-charged Black Death. Or, conversely, led to us developing digital computers in the 1700s. 

The point is that the variables are so extreme that the likelihood of another advanced technological civilization existing anywhere nearby is infinitesimal, even if life exists nearly everywhere around us.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#10
TSM

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I choose to have an optimistic view.  Sure, there are plenty of things that could prevent intelligent life from evolving on a planet, but there are hundreds of billions of stars in this galaxy alone.  And we know that there are around a trillion stars in Andromeda.  And there are hundreds of billions of galaxies in the visible universe.  We also know that having at least one rocky planet orbiting a star seems to be normal and not extraordinary.  

 

That's a lot of chances for intelligent life to happen.  Even if it's incredibly rare.  



#11
OnedayIwillfly

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The chance that there's an alien civilization in our galaxy, let alone the universe, is pretty high. It would be very odd if we were the only civilization in the entire universe. The universe is just too big for there only to be one civilization. I do however hope that there isn't one in our neighbouring systems.






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