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500 years from now?


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12 replies to this topic

#1
Maximum7

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I was talking with my buddy Tom on Alien Soup about what people would be researching in 2119. He thought that it could be advanced AI and mind uploading. I totally agree. Then he said “500 years. What would be researching then? That I have no idea”.

Yeah I can’t even fathom what we will be doing in 5 centuries. I don’t even think the human race will be around anymore. What do you think we will be working on in 500 years, if we are even here?

I think Nano is the last level of miniaturization by the way.

#2
Raklian

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Most definitely they'll be researching immortality.  :biggrin:


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#3
caltrek

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Maybe, how to develop better artificial habitats for living on the moons of Saturn or other planets in the solar system such as Mars?

 

Remember, not just establishing colonies there in the first place, but colonies that take better advantage of local resources.

 

Along those same lines, how to make further advances in terraforming those moons and planets?

 

How to shorten the travel time between locations in the solar system?

 

Increasing the longevity of human life will probably also be a pretty constant field of research.  Of course, by then it might be extending the human life from 160 years to 180 years or some other fantastic length of time.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#4
caltrek

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Ok, now I didn't know Raklian was about to post his comment about immortality, but that does corroborate my idea about extending the longevity of human life.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5
wjfox

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Terraforming techniques, faster-than-light travel, wormholes, quantum archaeology.



#6
caltrek

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"Terraforming techniques."

 

This might involve things like the use of CRISPR or other such advanced techniques to develop organisms that can best survive and prosper on planets and moons of our solar system.

 

Recovery of extinct species through cloning, CRISPR and other such technologies as may be developed including artificial wombs for gestating organisms. This may also lead to the more complicated question of restoring ecological relationships made possible from such species recovery.  This will involve philosophical as well as technical questions.  Exactly what type of biosphere is most desirable?  

 

I also wonder what advances might be made in the development of a Grand Unified Theory, and the application of such theory to cosmology and even technology.  

 

Ever newer types of astronomically oriented sensor devices (telescopes) may still be under development.

 

Along those lines, I can believe that further cataloguing stars and exoplanets  may result in developing and enhancing theories of star and planet formation and evolution based on that database.  This may still be going on at a vigorous pace 500 years from now.

 

Resolving the by then age-old question of how can humans and advanced AGI best co-exist may still be an issue.

 

Our species ought to have a much better understanding of "dark energy" and "dark matter" by then.  Perhaps even to the point of developing technological applications based on that understanding?

 

There are currently ideas about the possible existence of parallel universes or other such realities.  I wonder if further advancement along these lines will actually allow some method of interacting with or even exploring such parallel realities?  


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#7
Alislaws

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It is really hard to predict things that far ahead, look at where tech was 500 years ago!

 

Things like longevity research should surely be done by then (or maybe we'll be trying to figure out how to get people to live past 500, which might be hard for some reason we don't know about yet?) 

 

500 years ago medicine was basically a bunch of people guessing everything. today we have gene editing, brain surgery etc. Even 500 years operating strictly at todays level of technology could probably come up with a method for achieving negligible senescence. If we factor in improvements to medical imaging, computing power, potential AI expert systems and AGI then this should be solved much earlier, unless we get some major worldwide setback like a global collapse. 


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#8
wjfox

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Death will be obsolete in 500 years. Assuming we still have physical bodies then (it will most likely be avatars that we occasionally sleeve into).

 

Even if your body is destroyed in a horrendous accident, it will instantly rematerialise, akin to "respawning" in a video game. 

 

Unimaginably tiny sensors will be embedded everywhere, and in everything, constantly measuring the precise molecular and quantum states of your body. In the event of death or serious injury, a rebuilding process will take place, e.g. with miniature tractor beams, nanobots, or something we can't imagine today. This will happen in a split second.


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#9
funkervogt

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Earth-based civilization will have spread to other star systems by 2519. 



#10
Jakob

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Death will be obsolete in 500 years. Assuming we still have physical bodies then (it will most likely be avatars that we occasionally sleeve into).

 

Even if your body is destroyed in a horrendous accident, it will instantly rematerialise, akin to "respawning" in a video game. 

 

Unimaginably tiny sensors will be embedded everywhere, and in everything, constantly measuring the precise molecular and quantum states of your body. In the event of death or serious injury, a rebuilding process will take place, e.g. with miniature tractor beams, nanobots, or something we can't imagine today. This will happen in a split second.

You could probably kill someone if you really wanted to by sneakily altering their mind until it's outside the parameters of what's considered them. And the existence of such technology implies it could also be used accidentally. Maybe backups will be rare for cultural reasons, or maybe said backups will be considered legally and socially distinct, allowing the original to die. Biological immortality may be impossible or require terrible sacrifices that most people won't want to make. Or the concept of a discrete person may become obsolete.



#11
zEVerzan

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Hopefully FTL travel. Who wants to stay chained to this wimpy little star system anyway


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#12
Alislaws

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Earth-based civilization will have spread to other star systems by 2519. 

Hmmm, assuming FTL Is impossible, is this still true? 

 

How soon could we get a craft to another solar system?

I can't find any good estimates (they all say things like: "using an ion drive it would take X years, but they don't say: "using rockets and a gravity slingshot for initial acceleration and then switching to Ion drive propulsion it would take X years")



#13
funkervogt

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Yes, I think 500 years is enough time for us to reach other star systems, even without FTL travel tech. 

 

We'll be able to use a small number of self-replicating machines to rapidly develop alien planets. 






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