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In a futuristic VR would it be possible to live in an exact replica of the present day world?


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#1
10 year march

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I want to live in a exact replica of the world starting in 2015 playing myself as I turn 18.
With a few personal modifications to the world

I want to live in a replica of the current world starting 2015 so I get to make smarter life decisions and end up marrying my crush ect.

Could future AIs simulate the past so well that its a exact replica. Could this be done with a greater understanding of space time and physics or something?

Is it impossible?

#2
wjfox

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It's probably happening right now. For me, anyway.

#3
tomasth

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A BCI that can program your day/night dreams e could make a VR dream that you would think was real.

Does it need to be an exact replica , or would convincing you it is , is enough ?

#4
10 year march

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A BCI that can program your day/night dreams e could make a VR dream that you would think was real.

Does it need to be an exact replica , or would convincing you it is , is enough ?

Id like a exact replica with a few changes.

 

I am working on a word document outlining these changes.

 

a example at simulation start I loose $1000 USD and then receive a business worth $1000 USD which grows at 10% a year/



#5
funkervogt

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It's not possible because the machine generating the VR replica world would need to have perfect information about what your surroundings were like in 2015. You almost certainly lack that information. 

 

However, late this century, everything and everyone will be under surveillance, so it will be possible to use VR to piece together moments in time. Someone in 2100 could re-live a day in 2075 with perfect accuracy (or so close to perfect that a limited human mind couldn't detect the inaccuracies). 


  • wjfox, Yuli Ban, caltrek and 2 others like this

#6
Yuli Ban

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Certainly not an exact one, for the same reasons funkervogt mentioned. But by the time it's possible, you won't know the difference. 

 

Back in 2014 and 2015 when I first started getting really nostalgic, one of my favorite activities was imagining that I'd get to relive certain years in VR, specifically 2007 and some vague year in the early 2000s. I'd listen to the right music, play a certain game that would allow me to see just the right atmospheric effects, and go on dreaming. I'd watch videos on people playing VR games and imagine those fuzzy graphics replicating my life in the 2000s in some way. It was around that time that I thought about just how feasible it'd be to simulate a year. We want to believe it'd be a perfect simulation, the digital equivalent of time travel. That if we had the right tools, we'd be able to relive through, say, 1968 perfectly. But the truth is that we never will. Maybe we'll get close and maybe some distant future simulation will, by accident a la some Boltzmann Brain effect, perfectly simulate every single word, every single movement of every bug, every single, facial movement, every single drop of enraged spittle, every single fart of that year. But that's probably not going to happen for a long, long, long time and, again, only through some Library of Babel scenario where literally every atomic position has been modeled in every situation. If that ever happens, I'd pay good money that even a Technological Singularity won't change the fact that it's at least hundreds of years in the future. 

 

But like I said, it doesn't need to be a perfect recreation, and we can literally never know if it's a perfect simulation. There are things that are completely unknowable. Events that occurred that are lost to time because no one recorded them and those who experienced them have long since died, leaving zero evidence they ever happened— but, if you did experience them, you'd never forget and think they'd all but define the spirit of the year. Just because those events are gone forever doesn't mean we couldn't make a rough facsimile of the year. 

 

Let's assume we wanted to simulate the year 2019 AD as accurately as we possibly could. It's 2119; the Singularity happened, and humans can upload their memories to the internet. 

The first thing you'd do to simulate 2019 wouldn't be to draw from those memories. It would be to find every single news article, photograph, video, tweet, blog post, etc. and compile it into the simulator. Figure out what definitely happened and where it happened. And that's not just from 2019. That's every article and fact from before then or discovery of things from before then. Then you add in memories and see how well they fit with these facts. 

What was the weather like in your area today? If the world wasn't ending, you probably didn't even notice. But the simulator will. Maybe you walked down the street and there was a passing cloud that cooled you off. Or maybe the temperature went from "ungodly cold" to "slightly less ungodly cold" from morning to noon.  You won't remember 100 years from now, even if you go out of your way to commit it to memory. At some point, you'll forget or misremember some small detail, and that'll start compounding until, at some point years from now, what you remember and what actually happened are two entirely different things save for maybe one common root of "there was a cloud that passed over" or "it was cold, then slightly less cold." Without the actual recordings, you won't know the specifics. But for a life simulation, those specifics are important. 

 

Because you probably don't want to relive 2019 exactly. You're going to want to do things differently. You went to the store today? What if you didn't and instead drove to the beach? You posted on FutureTimeline.net's forums? What if, instead, you decided to post on a completely different forum, or better yet, go outside? 

 

The simulator now has to model this change of events. If I'm being simulated a hundred years from now with this specific post used as a factual resource and then 2119!Ban decides "You know what, fuck the next post I'd otherwise do, I'm gonna go for a walk" (or, if I do go for a walk in a few minutes, "I'm gonna stay online!"), that now switches up the entire simulation. Things that actually happen in history now can't happen in that same order. But everything else does... until I start acting, of course. 

 

Because regardless of if I keep posting or go for a walk, that doesn't change whether or not a carnival goes on a few towns over or if a new bank is opened or if it rains in New York City (and I checked, it is raining there right now— but me saying that doesn't matter because the simulator will already have forecasts, social media posts, etc. to know that). And, if there are any people who remember this day, 9 December 2019, their memories may corroborate various facts, but chances are the day will be lost in the fuzz of time to them. Therefore, it's only the facts that we can really use to model the past. Facts and interpretations, of course: blog posts, diaries, journals, personal statements, and whatnot really only relate how we interpret and experience things, not the actual events themselves. So they're more of a "fuzzy" case for simulation than anything, but I presume the simulator will take whatever it can get. 

 

The same goes for older eras. We can roughly model 1968 based on facts we have from that year.

 

Ironically, simulations of simulations will be more accurate than the real thing; once Simulated 2019 has passed, the simulator will have all records of what happened, barring some limits to storage preventing this. Therefore, if I wanted to relive Simulated 2019, I could do it perfectly.


  • wjfox, Alislaws, waitingforthe2030s and 1 other like this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#7
waitingforthe2030s

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No.

I'm a radical demo-publiacrat.

 

This is Scatman's world, and we're living in it.


#8
Alislaws

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You posted on FutureTimeline.net's forums? What if, instead, you decided to post on a completely different forum, or better yet, go outside

Oh No! The darkest timeline!

 

-----

 

Technically You would be able to create a version of a given year that was more realistic than any human's memory of that year. So on a practical level this would be totally achievable.

 

There would be a lot of issues though, so I suspect this may never be a service/product that is available. 

 

Ultimately I might want to go back and relive a year but my ex girlfriend (who was during that year, my non-ex girlfriend) might object to a version of her (based on scraping all her data, social media, and maybe memories?) being a part of my nostalgic fantasy even if everything was strictly PG13!

(Introducing adult content in this sort of scenario and you'd need disclaimers/waivers etc. signed by thousands of people for a realistic experience, and that is 'per player')  

 

You would need licences for all movies, songs etc. that you might see during that year, every celebrity/politician etc. would probably require you to pay to have them appear. Any really humiliating things that happened would have the people involved refusing permission to be shown in the recreation. 

 

How could you recreate 2019 if Trump refused to give you permission to use any of his personal info or likeness?

 

Maybe a "Generic 2019 Experience" would be more likely. In which Ronald Drumpf is president and keeps making crazy posts on twittle!

 

As long as everyone was dead you might be okay, but your information would be worse for years that are far enough back that everyone alive then is dead so your recreation would likely not be as realistic.  



#9
Yuli Ban

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^ In a world of advanced AI (especially media synthesizing AI), copyright and likeness is no longer a concern

 

As long as everyone was dead you might be okay, but your information would be worse for years that are far enough back that everyone alive then is dead so your recreation would likely not be as realistic.  

You know, for a few years now, I've wonder if it's possible to do a sort of "regressive deduction" with human behavior. We may not know what ones thoughts are and, once they're dead, we never will. But it ought to be reasonably possible to get some decent facsimile of it through recordings of their actions and behaviors, whether through cameras, social media posts, news articles that mention them, and, at the very least, other's memories. With an AI that can model human behavior, this ought to go in all possible directions, but bottom up and top down.

 

Take myself. Let's say I die sometime in the near future and never get to upload my memories to any other substrate. How would a future ASI simulate me? First, it would collect whatever physical and digital data it has on me, of which there's quite a bit: roughly 21,000 posts on this forum, thousands of posts on other forums going back 11 years, thousands of posts on Reddit, hundreds on Tumblr, dozens on Twitter and Facebook, whatever fiction it knows I've written, school records, posts other people have on me (which isn't much, but might be enough to be usable), pictures and videos I'm in, maybe even files on my computer if, for whatever reason, someone is able to access it remotely (which is actually possible with the Cloud). So it would know how I interpret my thoughts, what music I listen to, my freakish fetishes my bizarre preferences in storytelling, what I look like, what I sound like, and what I'd hope and dream about. 

It would only understand surface-level aspects of myself with just that, though, so it'd have to also model me as a human being. This is much easier than figuring out my personality traits because it features things common to everyone else. 

As a human being, I presumably have certain biological instincts and quirks, as well as various physiological/psychological needs. True, with all that added information, it'll be able to deduce where these traits swing; it'd have a much easier time figuring out how I respond to these biological impulses with my own input into this matter. But it can at least figure out that I'm probably going to follow some basic biological cycles.

 

I wouldn't be surprised if a sufficiently powerful AI could parse through all of it so well that it could recreate a "generic day in the life of Yuli Ban" with at least 90+% accuracy despite not knowing any of the smaller details.

 

 

But now we're crossing over into Digital Twin territory.

 

 

Do you know what it would mean if it's possible, though? I'd never be able to leave this forum, even if I died or even went primitivist for some reason. Just get a Yuli Bot and it would replicate me almost perfectly.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#10
Lucid

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What makes you assume we aren't living in a futuristic VR right now? 

 

And yes, it's possible. Not only that, but the simulation you would like to enter can appear more "real" to you than your current existence. You could live in any time period and exist as any form, see new colors and experience new senses. With simulated realities you would be able to understand concepts that are currently limited by our 3-dimensional existence. 

 

If your life is anything you imagine, what is realistic? What is real? 






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