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Life and climate on Earth a billion years from now


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#1
CyberMisterBeauty

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Hi people, I`m back.

 

Today I want to talk about how life and the climate on our planet is gonna be a billion years from now. The timeline says that by then Sun`s luminosity will have increased by 10%. This don`t seen too much and it also says that Earth will then become too hot to support life and liquid water. But I think this prediction is very pessimistic because:

 

- I don`t believe that the entire planet will become devoid of life. What about the poles, the Greenland, Siberia and Antarctica? I think these cold places will actually have more lifeforms than the Amazon rainforest nowadays;

 

- If the Sun will become brighter, more energy Earth will receive and therefore more energy will be available for photosynthesis and more energy will become available for life to grow and develop;

 

- A billion years is a very, very long time. I think at least life on the oceans will have enought time to adapat to such changes to such an extant that animals and plants will look alien compared to today.

 

 

 

1,000,000,000 AD

Earth is becoming too hot to support liquid water

The Sun's luminosity has increased by 10%, causing Earth's surface temperatures to reach an average of 47°C (116°F).* As the seas and oceans begin to evaporate, the atmosphere is becoming laden with water vapour, creating an intense greenhouse effect. Mars is actually becoming more habitable during this time.*

 

https://www.futureti...ond-1000000.htm

 

It says that the average Earth surface temperature will be around 47 degrees centigrades. This is very hot, hotter than summertime here in Rio de Janeiro. However I think the poles could still be as warm as Europe or the mediterranean is nowadays.

 

It also seens that Earth will become much cloudier due to the enormous amount of water vapour in the atmosphere caused by the greenhouse efffect. Don`t you think that this could actually make Earth cooler further into the more distant future?



#2
funkervogt

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- I don`t believe that the entire planet will become devoid of life. What about the poles, the Greenland, Siberia and Antarctica? I think these cold places will actually have more lifeforms than the Amazon rainforest nowadays;

All of the continents will have moved to new places by 1 billion A.D., so Greenland, Siberia and Antarctica probably won't be near the poles anymore. 

 

https://io9.gizmodo....ntinent-5738492

 

1 billion years is more than enough time to build a Dyson Swarm, and we could keep Earth cool by positioning some of the swarm satellites between the Sun and the Earth to shade the latter. 

 

If Earth gets too hot to support life in spite of our efforts, we could upload all sentient life forms (including animals) into a computer and send the computer into space. We'll surely have the technology to do that by then. 



#3
PhoenixRu2020

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1 billion years is more than enough time to build a Dyson Swarm, and we could...

 

One billion years is far beyond my imagination. One thing I know for sure: by that time there will no longer be any "we". Humanity will either become a thing of distant geological past or will evolve - and no once, but tens, hundreds, thousands times, again and again - into something completely unimaginable.

 

As for the climate and evolution, the current models and predictions leave us some room for guesses. That's what came to my mind:

 

As the current climatic models says, by 1 billion A.D. the Earth's surface temperature will be significantly higher but still tolerable, about 40-50 C instead of current 15. This excess heat will become the serious problem for complex living beings, which may entirely abandon the ecuatorial areas and shallow waters. What's even worse, the carbon dioxide level will fall so low that photosynthesis in any of currently known forms will no longer be possible. Plants will either die out or will have to "invent" some new, so far unimaginable ways to survive.

 

With no plants, there will be no soil, only rocks and sand. And with no photosynthesis, the oxygen level will very quickly drop to nearly zero. Perhaps, such will be the end of complex life. Other hand, one billion years is a long time. It is quite possible that evolution will find the way out, and some alien visitors will find the still thriving and complex biosphere, full of no-longer-plants and not-quite-animals with their weird biomes and food chains, qualitatively different from anything we know today.



#4
tomasth

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Issac arthur a lot of shows on those times and what might far far future decedents of us could do.

#5
CyberMisterBeauty

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1 billion years is more than enough time to build a Dyson Swarm, and we could...

 

One billion years is far beyond my imagination. One thing I know for sure: by that time there will no longer be any "we". Humanity will either become a thing of distant geological past or will evolve - and no once, but tens, hundreds, thousands times, again and again - into something completely unimaginable.

 

As for the climate and evolution, the current models and predictions leave us some room for guesses. That's what came to my mind:

 

As the current climatic models says, by 1 billion A.D. the Earth's surface temperature will be significantly higher but still tolerable, about 40-50 C instead of current 15. This excess heat will become the serious problem for complex living beings, which may entirely abandon the ecuatorial areas and shallow waters. What's even worse, the carbon dioxide level will fall so low that photosynthesis in any of currently known forms will no longer be possible. Plants will either die out or will have to "invent" some new, so far unimaginable ways to survive.

 

With no plants, there will be no soil, only rocks and sand. And with no photosynthesis, the oxygen level will very quickly drop to nearly zero. Perhaps, such will be the end of complex life. Other hand, one billion years is a long time. It is quite possible that evolution will find the way out, and some alien visitors will find the still thriving and complex biosphere, full of no-longer-plants and not-quite-animals with their weird biomes and food chains, qualitatively different from anything we know today.

 

 

I have other curiosity: There is a post talking about a new Pangea continent by the year 250 million AD. It is written in Wikipedia that Sun-like stars increase 1% their luminosity every 100 million years, which means that in the year 250 million AD the Sun will be 2,5% brighter than today. Do you think a mere 2,5 per cent increase in brightness would be noticeable to the naked eye if it was possible to take a time machine and go to such far future?

 

250,000,000 AD

A supercontinent is forming on Earth

The next Pangea – Pangea Ultima – is forming, with all of the major continents moving back together, surrounding a small ocean basin.

Our Sun is becoming noticeably hotter and brighter, raising global temperatures by several degrees. Much of Earth is now covered by deserts.

 

https://www.futureti...ond-1000000.htm

 

It already says that Earth will be many degrees hotter in the year 250 million. So in the year 1 billion the Equatorial/tropical areas will be a true hell for life :o 



#6
PhoenixRu2020

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It is written in Wikipedia that Sun-like stars increase 1% their luminosity every 100 million years, which means that in the year 250 million AD the Sun will be 2,5% brighter than today. Do you think a mere 2,5 per cent increase in brightness would be noticeable to the naked eye if it was possible to take a time machine and go to such far future?

 

I think no. Human eye desined to soften the differences of luminosity (so that they will be perceived less significant thn they really are). And these extra 2,5% will pass absolutely unnoticed.



#7
TSM

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If Humanity still exists a billion years from now, I have no doubt we'll figure someone out. The thing people forget when talking about this situation a billion years from now, is that a billion years ago multi-cellular organisms didn't even exist.  Considering that, what things will be like a billion years from now we can only guess at.  



#8
CyberMisterBeauty

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If Humanity still exists a billion years from now, I have no doubt we'll figure someone out. The thing people forget when talking about this situation a billion years from now, is that a billion years ago multi-cellular organisms didn't even exist.  Considering that, what things will be like a billion years from now we can only guess at.  

 

Society could just move Earth away from the Sun and avoid life to collapse. Am I right?






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