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What if covid-19 arrived in the 1960's


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#1
RoboRage

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Just curious if covid-19 arrived in the 1960's? How long would it take as to come up with a vaccine?



#2
Yuli Ban

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It kinda did.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#3
RoboRage

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What's the difference between this and covid-19?



#4
SastangFever

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It would spread slower and be more deadly to the elderly.

#5
caltrek

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What's the difference between this and covid-19?

 

I am not an expert on this sort of thing, but I think there are differences in things like incubation period within the body, which affects the rate of transmission through out the population (put another way how many people on average can be expected to receive the virus from each person who is already infected), and what percent of infected people will die form the illness.

 

I couldn't help but think of this thread when I came upon the article cited below.  A lot of progress has been made along the lines of sequencing the RNA of the virus.  Artificial Intelligence has also been employed to use this sequencing information to help develop a vaccine. Still, the cited article underlines the the ways in which progress in treatment has really not been that great.

 

 

Why we’re still relying on a century-old strategy to treat COVID-19

 

https://www.theverge.com/2020/4/13/21216513/plasma-blood-coronavirus-treament-drug-development-antibodies

 

Introduction:

(The Verge) COVID-19 research is advancing at an unprecedented speed, but one strategy doctors are leaning on to treat COVID-19 patients looks more antiquated than innovative. In hospitals around the United States, caregivers are resorting to using century-old convalescent plasma therapy — siphoning blood from survivors and reinfusing it into the sick.

 

That’s because the hundreds of research papers published in the past few months and the record-setting leaps in vaccine development haven’t been fast enough to keep up with the blistering speed of the ongoing pandemic. People are sick and dying now, which is why doctors are falling back on plasma therapy as one stopgap measure that they hope can help in the lag time before other treatments come online.

 

“I think of it as a bridge, until we can develop a vaccine or pharmaceutical that can be shown to be safe, and effective, and can be produced in mass quantities,” says Elliott Bennett-Guerrero, who is studying the use of this convalescent plasma in COVID-19 patients at Stony Brook Medicine.

 

After someone is infected with a virus like the novel coronavirus and recovers, their blood is rich with antibodies that their immune system produced to help them fight the virus off. Doctors hope that giving the antibody-infused blood plasma to a newly sick person, who may not have antibodies yet, could help them get better more quickly.

 

“With plasma we’re leveraging the body’s amazing ability to develop antibodies and immunity to pathogens,” Bennett-Guerrero says. “We transfer those protective factors to people who are sick and haven’t been able to mount an immune response.”

 

It’s been used as a treatment since at least the 1890s when blood from survivors was given to diphtheria patients.


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