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1918 flu pandemic


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7 replies to this topic

#1
wjfox

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Weird how history repeats itself...




#2
tomasth

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Different age groups , very different mortality rate , different social and scientific circumstance.

 

There were other pandemics after that (order of magnitude more deaths then current).



#3
kjaggard

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everybody always misses the fact that there was more than one wave of the 'spanish' flu. The numbers of deaths from innitial infections, through each pass through population centers would do a lot to knock the edges off of this belief that this is a one and done situation


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#4
Jakob

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The key reason why the 1918 flu was so deadly was because we did not have a God-Emperor to save us, He would not take on a human form for another 28 years.



#5
TranscendingGod

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The key reason why the 1918 flu was so deadly was because we did not have a God-Emperor to save us, He would not take on a human form for another 28 years.

How come this doesn't get old to you? It it because you occasionally elicit some reaction from the poor misinformed liberals that you so like to irk? It is genuinely still funny to you? Is this your way to release stress or obfuscate some underlying insecurity? Or is it simply that you've given up trying to speak to the misinformed misanthropes that pervade and putrefy this forum with greater fecundity than the abscess covered genitalia of your local whore?  

 

Not that I care obviously *flips hair* hmphh 


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#6
Jakob

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The key reason why the 1918 flu was so deadly was because we did not have a God-Emperor to save us, He would not take on a human form for another 28 years.

How come this doesn't get old to you? It it because you occasionally elicit some reaction from the poor misinformed liberals that you so like to irk? It is genuinely still funny to you? Is this your way to release stress or obfuscate some underlying insecurity? Or is it simply that you've given up trying to speak to the misinformed misanthropes that pervade and putrefy this forum with greater fecundity than the abscess covered genitalia of your local whore?  

 

Not that I care obviously *flips hair* hmphh 

 

No, I'm simply one of His messengers.



#7
wjfox

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Well, from now on, I'll be deleting this boring and totally unfunny meme – until you contribute something more insightful to this forum.



#8
caltrek

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The 1918 Pandemic Nearly Derailed the Women's Suffrage Movement

 

https://www.national...frage-movement/

 

Introduction:

(National Geographic) “These are sad times for the whole world, grown unexpectedly sadder by the sudden and sweeping epidemic of influenza,” wrote Carrie Chapman Catt, president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, in a letter to supporters in 1918.

 

“This new affliction is bringing sorrow into many suffrage homes and is presenting a serious new obstacle in our Referendum campaigns and in the Congressional and Senatorial campaigns,” she continued. “We must therefore be prepared for failure.”

 

Suffragists had been fighting for women’s right to vote for 70 years, and victory seemed almost in reach. Even with the United States fully mobilized for World War I. President Woodrow Wilson had come out in support of a constitutional amendment, and the House of Representatives had passed it.

 

Then the Spanish flu struck, and the leaders of one of the longest-running political movements in the country’s history had to figure out how to continue their campaign in the midst of the deadliest pandemic in modern times. (See how some cities 'flattened the curve' of the flu pandemic.)

 

The first wave of the flu coursed through the country in the spring of 1918, ebbing by summertime. During that period, the Senate, dominated by southern Democrats determined to stop the enfranchisement of African-American women, was refusing to pass the bill to send the suffrage amendment to the states for ratification. Votes were announced twice, then canceled. By early fall, suffragists could see that they were two votes short of the necessary two-thirds for passage.

 

original.jpg

Combating influenza in Seattle in 1918, workers wearing masks on their faces in a Red Cross room.

The Atlantic


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