Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Activists rally to save Internet Archive as lawsuit threatens site


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,580 posts
  • LocationLondon

Activists rally to save Internet Archive as lawsuit threatens site

Jun 10, 2020

The Internet Archive is a massive endeavor—it's an online library aiming to "provide Universal Access to All Knowledge." It has digitized millions of web pages, movies, photos, recordings, software programs, and books that might otherwise be lost to history.

But it's neither un-censorable nor outside the bounds of copyright law. And now open internet supporters are wondering how to save it before it disappears.

In March, as the COVID-19 pandemic led to the shutdown of public libraries, the Internet Archive created the National Emergency Library and temporarily suspended book waitlists—the kind that make you cool your jets for 12 weeks to download "A Game of Thrones" onto your Kindle—through the end of June. In doing so, it essentially allowed for a single copy of a book to be downloaded an infinite number of times.

Book publishers weren't happy. Last Monday, Hachette, HarperCollins, Penguin Random House, and Wiley—four publishing behemoths—sued the organization. The lawsuit argues that "IA’s actions grossly exceed legitimate library services, do violence to the Copyright Act, and constitute willful digital piracy on an industrial scale."

[...]

If the court finds that Internet Archive "willfully" infringed copyright, the library could be on the hook for up to $150,000 in damages—per each of the 1.4 million titles. (You do the math.)

 

https://decrypt.co/3...wsuit-threatens



#2
SastangFever

SastangFever

    Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts
  • Locationhere
Internet archive is a valuable resource that should remain forever. Although I hate that you can archive lots of websites because it's from a site of controversy or has nsfw.

#3
Erowind

Erowind

    Anarchist without an adjective

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,520 posts
Like burning The Library of Alexandria

#4
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,529 posts

I guess I really don't understand copyright law, or even the philosophy behind existing copyright law.

 

What I mean to say is to me it should be a matter of how the information is placed on the internet in the first place.  If it is placed behind an ad wall or a pay wall, then I can see grounds for a copyright complaint.  If it is placed with no such protective measures, than what should the basis be for invoking copyright protection?

 

It becomes too much like:  "For your usage, I am submitting this to the internet.  But if you actually use it, I am going to sue you."

 

That just doesn't make sense to me.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5
Outlook

Outlook

    N'wah

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationBarbary Lands

The dumbasses in publishing don't realize that hounding on a legitimate nonprofit source like the Internet Archive that will bend to legal demands and copyright strikes will just make illegal sources much more popular. Fuck those guys, they deserve shit like library genesis and sci-hub.


Outlook's secret song of the ~week: https://youtu.be/GMYezR1cwFA


#6
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,529 posts

If the court finds that Internet Archive "willfully" infringed copyright, the library could be on the hook for up to $150,000 in damages—per each of the 1.4 million titles. (You do the math.)

 

An article in Vox indicates that this is not true:

 

...in fact, the lawsuit seeks financial damages only for the sharing of 127 books under copyright, including titles like Gone Girl, A Dance with Dragons, and The Catcher in the Rye. If the court awards the plaintiffs the maximum amount provided under the law, the most the Internet Archive would have to pay would be $19 million — essentially equivalent to one year of operating revenue, according to IA tax documents. That’s a huge setback, but for the IA, a tech nonprofit that relies heavily on grants and public donations, it’s not the major death blow it might seem to be.

 

The Vox article goes on to conclude:

 

On Monday, the Association of Research Libraries issued a statement asking the publishers to drop the lawsuit.

 

“For nearly 25 years,” the Association’s statement reads, “the Internet Archive (IA) has been a force for good by capturing the world’s knowledge and providing barrier-free access for everyone, contributing services to higher education and the public, including the Wayback Machine that archives the World Wide Web, as well as a host of other services preserving software, audio files, special collections, and more.”

 

Because the Internet Archive is a well-established vanguard of open access, the lawsuit could potentially have a larger, chilling effect on internet archival and research practices — even if it fails, and even if that wasn’t the original intent. Let’s hope that the publishing industry can also recognize the Internet Archive as a force for good, before the lawsuit renders it a cautionary tale.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users