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The Future of Africa

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#1
wjfox

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Discuss.

 

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The 21st century belongs to China—but the 22nd will be Africa’s

The 21st century will most likely belong to China as the Chinese Century. But with a rapid increase in Chinese investment and African innovation, the 22nd century may see the dawn of the African Century.

China’s investment in Africa will create an infrastructure for African culture and innovation to accelerate. Chinese investments and contracts in sub-Saharan Africa total $299 billion from 2005 to 2018, according to the China Investment Global Tracker, and in 2018, Chinese president Xi Jinping vowed to invest a further $60 billion into African nations. If the continent can successfully navigate the issues raised by Chinese neo-colonial ambitions—such as the fear of “debt trap” diplomacy, with $130 billion in loans from China to African nations since 2000—they will be able to ascend from this trajectory into global power.

In this new age of unparalleled prosperity and influence, AI will wake up to its African soul. The musician Brian Eno once said that the problem with computers is that there is “not enough Africa” in them; computing needs to involve more of our bodies and more embodied rhythms, just as African music requires of its players. We will know that AI is working for humanity when it becomes more African.

African innovators are moving fast to make this a reality. Kwabena Boahen, a computer researcher and the director of the Brains in Silicon group at Stanford, is using neuromorphic engineering to create artificial retinas that give the blind the gift of sight. Oshiorenoya Agabi, a theoretical physicist based in Nigeria, just created Koniku Kore, a modem-sized gadget that utilizes neurons from mice to detect explosives and sense diseased cells. And Kamau Gachigi of Kenya created Gearbox, a hardware accelerator set up to empower African inventors to rapidly prototype their inventions.

As a forecaster and afrofuturist who imagines alternative futures from a black diaspora perspective, I think about long-term signals that will shape the next 10 to 100 years. I believe there are four major factors that will allow African nations to reveal the full power and reach of what my daughter calls our “cultural vibranium,” that fictional meteorite resource that advances the technology of Wakanda in the film Black Panther. Only this vibranium already exists as a state of mind within the African soul.

 

https://qz.com/15506...e-22nd-century/

 

 

EZxp9jv.jpg



#2
funkervogt

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The 22nd century will belong to intelligent machines. 



#3
Raklian

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The 22nd century will belong to intelligent machines. 

 

Which ones? Machines bent on the destruction of humanity or the benevolent ones who empathize with the inherent fallacy of the human condition? What about the hybrids who posit that they must selectively weed out the detrimental elements of the human race? Or even humans with extreme cybernetic enhancements who believe pure humans must be relocated to a zoo-like habitat to live the rest of their lives in free-range captivity? 

 

And no one can really say there can't be a war between these groups, a Machine Civil War out of which the victor will determine the fate of the biologicals.

 

The nihilists will call this process creative destruction which will reveal the race most adaptable to lead in the next epoch of our ongoing evolution in the centuries and millennia to come. Nature is not so kind to let those who believe they deserve to keep existing to survive. It is a cruel master of entropy which invariably demands the path of least resistance for the flow of energy be traversed unimpeded forever.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#4
funkervogt

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Which ones?

No one knows. 



#5
10 year march

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Africa will remain impoverished untill imperialism in Africa ends at which point it will rapidly develop using the knowledge of richer countries

#6
SeedNotYetSprouted

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The 22nd century will belong to intelligent machines.

 

 

The 22nd century could belong to African intelligent machines; you can never be sure. Perhaps, something like Orisha from the game 'Overwatch' could be the norm.

 

Africa will remain impoverished untill imperialism in Africa ends at which point it will rapidly develop using the knowledge of richer countries

 

You're probably right. As long as America, Russia, and China continue to plant bases over the continent, those three nations will continue to suck it dry and plunge its societies deeper into mountains of debt.  Their dollars have too much of an influence.

 

However, if it could be arranged so that their dollars have little influence at all, then maybe, Africa can have a bright future indeed.

 

Enter Akon City and the Akoin:

  1. https://www.akoin.io...wp/Akoin-WP.pdf
  2. https://news.bitcoin...cryptocurrency/
  3. https://www.prweb.co...web17165260.htm


#7
lechwall

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Discuss.

 

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The 21st century belongs to China—but the 22nd will be Africa’s

The 21st century will most likely belong to China as the Chinese Century. But with a rapid increase in Chinese investment and African innovation, the 22nd century may see the dawn of the African Century.

China’s investment in Africa will create an infrastructure for African culture and innovation to accelerate. Chinese investments and contracts in sub-Saharan Africa total $299 billion from 2005 to 2018, according to the China Investment Global Tracker, and in 2018, Chinese president Xi Jinping vowed to invest a further $60 billion into African nations. If the continent can successfully navigate the issues raised by Chinese neo-colonial ambitions—such as the fear of “debt trap” diplomacy, with $130 billion in loans from China to African nations since 2000—they will be able to ascend from this trajectory into global power.

In this new age of unparalleled prosperity and influence, AI will wake up to its African soul. The musician Brian Eno once said that the problem with computers is that there is “not enough Africa” in them; computing needs to involve more of our bodies and more embodied rhythms, just as African music requires of its players. We will know that AI is working for humanity when it becomes more African.

African innovators are moving fast to make this a reality. Kwabena Boahen, a computer researcher and the director of the Brains in Silicon group at Stanford, is using neuromorphic engineering to create artificial retinas that give the blind the gift of sight. Oshiorenoya Agabi, a theoretical physicist based in Nigeria, just created Koniku Kore, a modem-sized gadget that utilizes neurons from mice to detect explosives and sense diseased cells. And Kamau Gachigi of Kenya created Gearbox, a hardware accelerator set up to empower African inventors to rapidly prototype their inventions.

As a forecaster and afrofuturist who imagines alternative futures from a black diaspora perspective, I think about long-term signals that will shape the next 10 to 100 years. I believe there are four major factors that will allow African nations to reveal the full power and reach of what my daughter calls our “cultural vibranium,” that fictional meteorite resource that advances the technology of Wakanda in the film Black Panther. Only this vibranium already exists as a state of mind within the African soul.

 

https://qz.com/15506...e-22nd-century/

 

 

EZxp9jv.jpg

 

Africa will never be the dominant world power while such a concept exists (I suspect by the 22nd Century the concept of a world power will be an anachronism).

Even if Africa was a homogeneous unified country rather than a continent there's still no reason why you'd favour Africa over China or India who can match it population wise and will be less affected by climate change and who are already further along development wise.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#8
PhoenixRu

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In XXI century Africa will likely become (and already becoming) what East Asia was in second half of XX century: the world's workshop. Its increasingly urbanized and educated but still very poor population will attract the outside investors. Some successful countries will leave the "third world" category and become "middle developed". If they're big enough (like Nigeria), they'll become, and will be recognized, as new great powers. And some others will remain terribly backward.

 

And XXII century? Who knows... In past, there were cases of deep periphery becoming the new hegemon. Why not again? But IMHO this is still unlikely.

 

In this new age of unparalleled prosperity and influence, AI will wake up to its African soul. The musician Brian Eno once said that the problem with computers is that there is “not enough Africa” in them; computing needs to involve more of our bodies and more embodied rhythms, just as African music requires of its players. We will know that AI is working for humanity when it becomes more African.

 

Sorrywhat?



#9
SastangFever

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----------
 
The 21st century belongs to China—but the 22nd will be Africa’s

The 21st century will most likely belong to China as the Chinese Century. But with a rapid increase in Chinese investment and African innovation, the 22nd century may see the dawn of the African Century.

China’s investment in Africa will create an infrastructure for African culture and innovation to accelerate. Chinese investments and contracts in sub-Saharan Africa total $299 billion from 2005 to 2018, according to the China Investment Global Tracker, and in 2018, Chinese president Xi Jinping vowed to invest a further $60 billion into African nations. If the continent can successfully navigate the issues raised by Chinese neo-colonial ambitions—such as the fear of “debt trap” diplomacy, with $130 billion in loans from China to African nations since 2000—they will be able to ascend from this trajectory into global power.

In this new age of unparalleled prosperity and influence, AI will wake up to its African soul. The musician Brian Eno once said that the problem with computers is that there is “not enough Africa” in them; computing needs to involve more of our bodies and more embodied rhythms, just as African music requires of its players. We will know that AI is working for humanity when it becomes more African.

African innovators are moving fast to make this a reality. Kwabena Boahen, a computer researcher and the director of the Brains in Silicon group at Stanford, is using neuromorphic engineering to create artificial retinas that give the blind the gift of sight. Oshiorenoya Agabi, a theoretical physicist based in Nigeria, just created Koniku Kore, a modem-sized gadget that utilizes neurons from mice to detect explosives and sense diseased cells. And Kamau Gachigi of Kenya created Gearbox, a hardware accelerator set up to empower African inventors to rapidly prototype their inventions.

As a forecaster and afrofuturist who imagines alternative futures from a black diaspora perspective, I think about long-term signals that will shape the next 10 to 100 years. I believe there are four major factors that will allow African nations to reveal the full power and reach of what my daughter calls our “cultural vibranium,” that fictional meteorite resource that advances the technology of Wakanda in the film Black Panther. Only this vibranium already exists as a state of mind within the African soul.
 
https://qz.com/15506...e-22nd-century/
 
 
EZxp9jv.jpg


Why do you believe this if you believe in environmental catastrophe due to climate change? Your timeline says there will be a mass migration northwards. If anything Africa will be a quagmire of various warlord run states. The future belongs to the arctic circle powers. Any country with land there will be blessed with having a functional and safe country in the future

#10
R8Z

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Africa will remain impoverished untill imperialism in Africa ends at which point it will rapidly develop using the knowledge of richer countries

Just like Zimbabwe did recently, right? This is not how any of this thing works.

I believe that PhoenixRu is on the right track with his previous comment, Africa will probably take the path of either countries like Vietnam and China, to bootstrap their industry and quality of life, or stay as it is with slow to no progress.



#11
TranscendingGod

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Making predictions 80 years hence is extremely difficult and far beyond my capacities. However the current trend would appear to be that African development is hastened by massive Chinese investment. In 5 years we may be talking about a continent that is no longer wracked by food insecurity, communicable diseases, and egregious levels of child mortality. This would require an acceleration of the current trend line but it is not inconceivable that as China, Vietnam, and other Asian countries move up the value ladder the stabilization and prosperity of Africa becomes more valuable to wealthy countries. Investment in infrastructure, education, and public health will be paramount.

There must be a caveat interjected here though. Even resounding success stories like those of Rwanda and Ethiopia, which have had phenomenal real gdp growth rates over the past few decades, are still extremely poor nation's with per capital GDP of under $1000. That level of GDP is less than half of nations like Bangladesh and India. Add to that the fact that not all countries are undergoing an economic Renaissance like the aforementioned ones and the picture of Africa in 5 years time is one of poverty with some nation's that have managed to at least get beyond the stage of mere survival as a functional nation state into countries with enormous potential to develop into rich, prosperous, and productive nations.

And so it would seem that the 22nd century would be more plausible for African preeminence than the next 5 or 10 years. Of course can we even say that the 21st century is Chinese when the United States has remained the economic and military superpower for 1/5th of it? We've yet to find out if China can truly realize it's limitless potential. Africa however is on a good path overall. The world's poorest continent now has a way forward.
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#12
Erowind

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I don't have time or brain to go through all the nuance of the posts here. But consider that if the Sahel greens due to climate change there will likely be compact high rise technologically advanced cities there in 100 years assuming the species can get a handle on global supply chain disruption. Africa is very very big. Much of the continent faces desertification among other crisis, but barring collapse that would knock humans out on the other continents too (which is possible) it's unlikely the whole of Africa will face destruction. 



#13
Guyverman1990

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^The 22nd century could just as easily be the Indonesian or Brazilian century as well.



#14
Yuli Ban

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If you want my honest opinion on it:

 

I think Africa will cease to exist as a distinct geopolitical polity by the 22nd century. Most places will follow suit, actually. So while there'll still be "Africa" as a continent and technically lingering African cultures, we'll either see a complete dissolution of countries as we know them or a hyper-regionalization that effectively returns us to the era of city-states made self-sufficient by hyper-advanced technology with only loose confederal cultural unions keeping everyone together; in such a scenario, no continent will have an upper hand on the other. Robots in Africa will be no less and no more capable than robots in North America, Eurasia, or Australia.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#15
Maximus

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Who knows what the world will be like a century from now, never mind a few centuries. In the near future though, I think two major obstacles stand in the way of most African states achieving a high level of development; a warming climate, and automation.

 

With a warming climate, you have desertification, and water and food scarcity. Not good for countries with rapidly growing populations, and low levels of development. Sure, we could imagine that technology will solve these issues, but I doubt it will come in time. Far more likely, I envision massive famine and strife striking many African states as climate change hits us hard around the middle of this century.

 

Why won't these countries develop in time to avoid this? Automation in the developed world will mean we won't outsource our production and manufacturing to African states, like we did to China (I know I'm not the first to say this). In any case, if we did, rampant corruption among many African governments will continue to leach off of society and hinder development. Of course automation could also help lift underdeveloped states from poverty, but again I think it will come too late; developed countries are only starting to see the value of full-scale automation, never mind implementing it; underdeveloped countries are still focused on how to deal with starvation and ethnic conflict. 

 

It's a pessimistic view, but I believe this is what will come to pass for Africa unfortunately. I could see a few states surviving, and maybe some city-states as well, but I think overall many are headed for disaster.







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