Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

The Future of Remote Work


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1
starspawn0

starspawn0

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,071 posts
Interesting Twitter thread:

https://mobile.twitt...0818312192?s=19

I've spoken to around 1,000 companies over the last 6 months about their plans for remote work going forward

Here are a few things I've learned

HQ's are finished: companies will cut their commercial office space by 40-60%

The will allow every worker to work from home 2-4 days a week, and come into the office 1-2 days a week

Fully distributed: ~30% of the companies we talk to are getting rid of the office entirely and going remote-first

Companies doing this have seen their workers decentralize rapidly, leaving expensive cities to be closer to family

Access talent: The first reason they are going remote-first is simple – it lets them hire more talented people

Rather than hiring the best person in a 30-mile radius of the office, they can hire the best person in the world for every role

Cut costs: The second reason they are going remote-first is because it lets them be far more cost-efficient

Rather than spending $20,000 / worker / year on office space they can provide the best remote setup on the planet for $2,000 / worker / year

Remote burnout: The productivity inside the companies we've spoken to has gone through the roof

Their biggest concern is that workers burnout because they are working too hard

They are actively exploring ways to combat this

Remote onsites: 60%+ of companies we talk to are already thinking about ways to use time together physically to improve culture

The most popular we hear is flying the team into remote locations for ~week. Portugal, Spain, Puerto Rico seem to be the most popular

Personal choice: the smartest people I know personally are all planning to work remotely this decade

The most exciting companies I know personally all plan to hire remotely this decade

~90% of the workforces we've spoken to never want to be in an office again full-time

Async by default: is the thing that organizations are struggling with most

The majority of companies have replicated the office remotely and it is causing strains that are beginning to show

Personal injury: These are exploding. Companies haven't moved quickly enough to prevent them and back, neck and repetitive strain injuries are becoming a huge problem

Expect this to remedy this quickly by providing better, ergonomic equipment to workers

Universal problems: doesn't matter the size of the organization, every company is dealing with the same thing

We spoke to early-stage companies, publicly listed tech companies, through to legacy incumbents with hundreds of thousands of employees

All will be more remote

Pollution reduction: many companies we've spoken to care massively about the environmental impact that eradicating the office – and the commute – will have

108 million tons of Co2 less every year

Quality of life: even more importantly companies are realizing that they don't need to expect workers to waste 2 hours a day commuting to sit in an office chair for 8 hour

Almost every company we talk to believes that their workers will be happier as a result of remote work

Remote pressure: a few companies we've spoken to have decided to be more remote than they initially intended because their competitors already did it

There is a fear inside companies that if they don't go remote they will lose their best people to their competitors

Remote fear: most companies aren't scared about the quality of work that will be produced

They are scared about intangible things they can't measure
'quality of communication' && 'collaboration in person' && 'water cooler chat'

Many have realized these were excuses
3:41

Output over time: the measure of performance in the office is how much time you spend sat in your seat

The measure of performance while working remotely has to become output. Tools that enable this to be tracked more accurately are something we are asked for a lot

Written over spoken: documentation is the unspoken superpower of remote teams. The most successful team members remotely will be great writers

Companies are searching for ways to do this more effectively. Tools that enable others to write better will explode

Flattened orgs: middle management is in trouble, an unnecessary bottlenecks which serve no tangible purpose inside async organizations

Companies need coaching and facilitators to maximize organizational effectiveness



#2
tomasth

tomasth

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 306 posts

Robin henson had an interesting post about remote work.

 

https://www.overcomi...ation-lite.html

 

 

I wonder if enought companies going into remote work , will make others want to try more general humanoid robot (like Agility Robotics robot digit ?) for a varaty of tasks , driving hardware standardization and decreasing price.



#3
starspawn0

starspawn0

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,071 posts
Hanson is right... But it will be hugely disruptive to people's lives.  
 
....

Microsoft is now moving to allow more remote work, permanently.


https://www.theverge...-19-coronavirus

Microsoft will now allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50 percent of their working week, or for managers to approve permanent remote work. Employees who opt for the permanent remote work option will give up their assigned office space, but still have options to use touchdown space available at Microsoft’s offices.



#4
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

Bless the coronavirus for making this a reality! :)



#5
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

Most work won't be fully remote as others have said but homeworking will be a lot more common place it just makes a lot more sense for everyone involved.

Companies get to save leasing costs, employees get to save transport costs and the time spent travelling, the company then benefits from this as employees can work longer hours with no commute and are less tired as can get up later. Cuts down on C02 emissions, easier for parents to be around for their kids more if it at home it will definitely lead to a better society.

 

The only real losers are commercial landlords but really who cares about them. Rather than office space maybe something more interesting can be done with city centres like converting disused space into arts/leisure facilities. 


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#6
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

The only real losers are commercial landlords but really who cares about them. Rather than office space maybe something more interesting can be done with city centres like converting disused space into arts/leisure facilities. 

That, or simply building new houses or new apartments in them so that people could rent and/or buy them. Pro-immigration folks might love that! ;)



#7
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

 

The only real losers are commercial landlords but really who cares about them. Rather than office space maybe something more interesting can be done with city centres like converting disused space into arts/leisure facilities. 

That, or simply building new houses or new apartments in them so that people could rent and/or buy them. Pro-immigration folks might love that! ;)

 

 

There'll be less of a desire to live in city center's if people don't have to work there full time. Plus more expensive land to purchase so not necessarily economic to build residential properties on there.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#8
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

 

 

The only real losers are commercial landlords but really who cares about them. Rather than office space maybe something more interesting can be done with city centres like converting disused space into arts/leisure facilities. 

That, or simply building new houses or new apartments in them so that people could rent and/or buy them. Pro-immigration folks might love that! ;)

 

 

There'll be less of a desire to live in city center's if people don't have to work there full time. Plus more expensive land to purchase so not necessarily economic to build residential properties on there.

Couldn't the land there become significantly cheaper due to it becoming significantly less attractive, though?



#9
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

 

 

 

The only real losers are commercial landlords but really who cares about them. Rather than office space maybe something more interesting can be done with city centres like converting disused space into arts/leisure facilities. 

That, or simply building new houses or new apartments in them so that people could rent and/or buy them. Pro-immigration folks might love that! ;)

 

 

There'll be less of a desire to live in city center's if people don't have to work there full time. Plus more expensive land to purchase so not necessarily economic to build residential properties on there.

Couldn't the land there become significantly cheaper due to it becoming significantly less attractive, though?

 

 

Brownfield land will always be more expensive than greenfield land so I don't see a housing boom.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#10
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

What are Brownfield and Greenfield?



#11
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,287 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Bless the coronavirus for making this a reality! :)

This, 100%. No, 1,000%

 

We've been saying this in the Technological Unemployment thread, in Starspawn0's various threads on the near future of AI, on /r/MediaSynthesis, and various other places: automation is coming, it's going to smash into our economic system far sooner than anyone expects and in ways people could not predict, and the only way to truly prepare is to plan for life in a much more remote, much more automated society. 

 

We were either going to sleepwalk into a world of high automation and see major delays in its deployment as companies kept up the status quo (inevitably requiring Elon Musk-esque types to spearhead it) or we were going to require something like COVID-19 that completely forced us to reform the way we live for it. 

 

As I've mentioned before, the Trump administration didn't even make an attempt— they didn't even ATTEMPT— to raise the issue of automation, instead shifting the issue to immigrants. The one singular time they did back in 2017, Mnuchin had this to say:

Treasury Secretary  Steve Mnuchin is not worried about artificial intelligence displacing U.S. jobs for at least 50 to 100 years

 

True, that was back in 2017 when the immediate future was harder to gauge than it is now. But the writing's on the wall. It's white paint on a vantablack wall, in all caps, drawn by a volumetric optical illusionist who made it look 3D.

 

We absolutely needed to make a move to remote work as soon as possible. We needed to see a vastly greater focus on working from home, telepresence and teleworking, teleconferencing, high-bandwidth usage, and virtual jobs, as it would be the best way to ease us into the era of automation. So in that regard, thank goodness for COVID-19.

 

It was either this or, as I mentioned earlier, five to ten years of companies dragging their feet and delaying the inevitable, with far more subtle rollouts and politicking on funding the proper infrastructure followed by extreme social and economic upheaval.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#12
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

What are Brownfield and Greenfield?

 

Used and New land.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#13
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

Would unwanted used land really be worth more than wanted new land, though?



#14
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

Would unwanted used land really be worth more than wanted new land, though?

 

Land in city centers will always be wanted just maybe not as much for office space in the future.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#15
Futurist

Futurist

    Aspiring cross-dresser

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,108 posts
  • LocationSouthern California, United States of America, Planet Earth

 

Would unwanted used land really be worth more than wanted new land, though?

 

Land in city centers will always be wanted just maybe not as much for office space in the future.

What other purposes would it have? Apartment construction? What else? Parks?



#16
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,308 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

 

 

Would unwanted used land really be worth more than wanted new land, though?

 

Land in city centers will always be wanted just maybe not as much for office space in the future.

What other purposes would it have? Apartment construction? What else? Parks?

 

 

Vertical farms.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#17
lechwall

lechwall

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 208 posts
  • LocationSunny England

 

 

 

Would unwanted used land really be worth more than wanted new land, though?

 

Land in city centers will always be wanted just maybe not as much for office space in the future.

What other purposes would it have? Apartment construction? What else? Parks?

 

 

Vertical farms.

 

 

Tourist type attractions.


"The future will be better tomorrow.  If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure.   For NASA, space is still a high priority. The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. No, not our nation's, but in World War II. I mean, we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century, but in this century's history. Republicans understand the importance of bondage between a mother and child. We're going to have the best-educated American people in the world."  Dan Quayle

 


#18
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,287 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

"Once you can work from a coffee shop or your home, you can work from anywhere... A friend of mine remarked that 2020 will be seen by future historians as the year when the internet age truly began."
 



The day we will all finally be able to safely leave our homes will also be the day we will no longer need to. COVID-19 has dramatically accelerated the process of making nearly every possible good or service available at our homes.

We now have available to us more home entertainment options, and of a higher quality, than ever before. Many of us have become aware of the many ways in which teaching and learning can take place at home. Content migration processes that were expected to take years, if not decades, have been condensed into a few months or weeks. Healthcare, too, is going through an accelerated process of digitization, and even the lumbering machinery of government has been forced into an accelerated process of digitization.

And so the question will increasingly become: If we will no longer need to leave our homes, what are the purposes for which we will want to leave our homes? The bar for opening the door and going outside is going to be set much higher. The idea of our home as a sort of base from which we emerge into the world every day will increasingly become obsolete. A new presumption will emerge whereby staying at home is the daily default.

Pre-COVID-19 the ability to work from home on certain days was something to negotiate with the employer. In the post-COVID-19 world, the home will be the default workplace, and prospective employers will be required to negotiate your coming to “work”.

K-12 schools will see the unbundling of their three major services: mass babysitting, socialization, and actual learning, as the line between school, extracurricular activities, and camp might blur. And what will these developments mean for gender relations when more men work from home and children spend more time learning at home? Will it serve to further equalize the status of men and women, as both establish themselves equally in the home—or will our roles become stratified in new ways?

The desire for human contact will remain unchanged, and so, one of the most valuable services we will all seek is curated, high-quality social encounters, which will extend from its current niches in luxury networking conferences to become the norm by which we make new friends and acquaintances.
The human need for nature will also remain as strong as ever, and questions about who controls nature, and our equality of access thereto, will become a larger part of our politics.

We are now observing an acceleration of the process of creating a new, more private indoor ecology. As investments, our homes will become even more important than they are today. We will invest more in the technological infrastructures of our homes, and in every aspect of comfort and productivity.
With the pandemic still raging, it is natural that we long for the day when we can freely leave our homes. But in coming years, once that original sense of relief ebbs, we will increasingly ask ourselves why leaving was ever necessary.


Again, this could be crossposted into the Technological Unemployment thread. I don't mean to make it sound like remote work and automation are perfectly equivalent. They're not. However, one is evidence of another's effects and imminency. 

 

I believe I mentioned that we just became able to survive a major economic meltdown because of automation some time ago (I think back in March). Let me clarify: I was really referring to remote work, with true automation following immediately after. I strongly doubt that we had the infrastructure or the bandwidth to make our current response to COVID-19 even remotely possible as recently as five years ago. There was just too much not there that we didn't even realize wasn't there. 

If H1N1 in 2009 was as bad as COVID-19, we'd have absolutely collapsed by now, though I do feel that perhaps that would have spurred us to make 4G actually 4G. 


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users