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Any of you fellow futurists getting Cryopreserved when you die?


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51 replies to this topic

#21
MarcZ

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No. My pantheist ideals tell me that I should be returned to nature and eventually my molecules will be reconstructed in another form. :)



#22
King of Ace

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ill need to sign this up


I am not a fan of S.T show "just don't like it" ,Its boring like hell but I love to see cool technology in coming years.

i don't live in really great english countries like some you guys, im alittle indian,chinese,enbgrish ,mexican, leaf village and soul society .


#23
Casey

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Another question. How long after death can someone potentially be resurrected? Would it be worth it for a friend of mine to try cryopreserving someone that died last year?



#24
SG-1

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I really doubt it.  The brain decays so fast unfortunately.


Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#25
Kabe Ayofe

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I really doubt it.  The brain decays so fast unfortunately.

Unfortunately I agree. Theres a 7 year old documentary about ALCOR on youtube where they say the after a few days the brain practically turns to mush (after death)


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#26
Italian Ufo

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Even after few minutes or hours it may be late...thats why you can cut your head and freeze just that as an  option. the sooner you preserve the brain, the better.


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#27
Raklian

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If you go to their website, ALCOR emphasizes the importance of avoiding information death as clinical death isn't what really kills you. That's why after you're officially dead it's still okay but your brain needs to be preserved as soon as possible for the best possible outcome.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#28
Russell's teapot

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I decided already in my early teens that choosing to be cryopreserved was the most rational choice. I just didn't relish the thought of my dead and decomposing body being consumed by maggots and other flesh-eating organisms. The thought of being burnt to ashes didn't seem appealing either; especially not when considering that we now have an option that may actually make future reanimation possible. As long as the brain gets properly preserved and medicine advances sufficiently, I see absolutely no reason why cryonics won't work. The premise is sound.

 

My plan is to sign up with Alcor as soon as I'm done with my studies and have a stable job. Hopefully future life-extension technologies will make cryopreservation unnecessary, however. If I don't live long enough to avoid cryopreservation, the hope is that we will at the time of my death have other more advanced forms of preservation that preserves the brain in an optimal way (that, or at least superior ways to cryopreserve the brain). In the event that I die suddenly (in a plane crash or of a heart attack for example) after I'm signed up, It most likely won't matter much that I'm signed up since my body probably won't reach Alcors facility soon enough to avoid information-theoretic death - since I live in Norway. The reason that I'm going to sign up relatively soon is in case I get diagnosed with an incurable disease, such as a malignant brain tumor or something like that. Then it will be easier for me to be close to the cryopreservation-facility when I die (also, funding it through life-insurance is really the only realistic funding-method). I'm going to choose the whole-body preservation option, not just neuropreservation.

 

Unfortunately I highly doubt that anyone who has been cryopreserved at this point will ever be reanimated; I just don't think that present preservation and vitrification techniques are good enough to ensure the long-term viability of the brain. I haven't read much cryobiology, so I don't know much about how much damage is actually being done to the brain prior to and during the vitrification and cooling procedures. Being pessimistic just seems more reasonable than being optimistic, considering the fact that so much has to go according to plan for a succesfull reanimation to take place (brain not being irreparably damaged - facility not being blown up etc - medicine evolving to the point that it can repair the brain and fix/clone the rest of the body - people wishing to reanimate the cryopreserved +++) . Still, I definitely prefer to die knowing that I have a chance, however slim, of actually waking up again (preferably with a cybernetically enhanced body and a vastly superior intellect). I find it extremely surprising that so few people have signed up. The potential benefits, which is undeniably huge, in my opinion far outweigh what it costs to be signed up. I hope we will see more cryonics-companies in the not so distant future, and that cryopreservation will become a more normal choice.


Theorem: It is always too soon for despair. Proof: We do not know our fates.

- Robert C. W. Ettinger


#29
Casey

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I really doubt it.  The brain decays so fast unfortunately.

 

Aye, this is what I figured. I was wanting to bring up the idea of cryopreservation to this girl because her father died very suddenly last year (age 50, heart attack, no previous history of health problems), and losing a parent is one of the most horrible things I can imagine. Since there's not much hope to be found, though, I'll just let the issue lie, rather than pick at old scabs or risk giving her false hope.

 

Russel, I don't know much about cryobiology either, but I do know that some of the frozen bodies were analyzed after a 20 year period and it was determined that they were still good as new; Alcor's website also sounds rather optimistic and confident, wheras I think the writing would have much more of a warning, disclaimer-ish tone if cryopreservation was such an underdeveloped technology that utilizing it was an enormous risk. Not to say that the technology is completely matured and risk-free, but I think the situation is likely to be less bleak than you assume.



#30
Italian Ufo

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Anyway in order to increase cryoconservations companies the first move would be to make people think that this isnt science fiction.

Until people will think this is fiction there will be less demand to be preserved and also cost will remain high.



#31
Kabe Ayofe

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Anyway in order to increase cryoconservations companies the first move would be to make people think that this isnt science fiction.

Until people will think this is fiction there will be less demand to be preserved and also cost will remain high.

to be honest i think there probably are companies like alcor, that have opted to operate outside of the public eye. Just a feeling i've got.



#32
Italian Ufo

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Anyway in order to increase cryoconservations companies the first move would be to make people think that this isnt science fiction.

Until people will think this is fiction there will be less demand to be preserved and also cost will remain high.

to be honest i think there probably are companies like alcor, that have opted to operate outside of the public eye. Just a feeling i've got.

that could be possible.  Do you know Berlusconi? Rumors are that he will be cryoprseverd when he dies. He  built a huge burrial monument inside of his villa and apperently there is a high release of energy under it. So they say that he may be cryopreserved there when he dies.

 

I think what you say it may happen Kabe...

There must be some underground companies... I just wouldnt feel safe to give my body to the hands of these people...

I'd rather to make some economic sacrifice and give my doby in the hands of Alcor.


Edited by Italian Ufo, 21 January 2013 - 03:21 PM.


#33
Zeitgeist123

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if you are cryopreserved today, i have no doubt that you can be revived in the far future. but im also sure that all your memories (essentially what makes your present "self") and experiences you have in your past will never be recovered, ever. not even if you store a big memorabilia of videos of what you are and where you are coming from. in short, you will have to start your life all over again in a totally clean slate.


Edited by Zeitgeist123, 23 January 2013 - 03:23 AM.

“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#34
SG-1

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Why do you think that?

 

Those memories are stored in the connectome, why wouldn't it be there if the brain was persevered cryogenically?  Physically, the brain should be the same as it was when it went in, after reanimation.


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Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#35
Italian Ufo

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I have to agree with SG1

Also our DNA may store our memories as I posted a while ago..yet there is not enough evidence that ths may be possible



#36
Antevorta

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Exactly how far into the future would we be reanimated? Would it even be beneficial for us to be reanimated at that point? I wonder if by then, society and the human intellect would have evolved to a point that we simply could not catch up with, if we were suddenly resurrected. Just as if a caveman were to be brought back to life in today's day and age, it would be extremely difficult for him to accommodate to our lifestyle. Let alone contribute anything to it.Language is constantly evolving and may evolve into something completely unrecognizable to us. Language is a symbolic representation of thought, and over time, human thought will become more complex, changing according to new scientific discoveries and technological advances. 

 

I don't really see the benefit of us all being brought back to life if society has exponentially advanced during the time which we were all dead. Maybe for research, but I don't know how much we would be able to contribute to the development toward complexity. :scratchhead:

 

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The future is a revolution against the present

 

#37
StanleyAlexander

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^ Good call.  I'm sure cryopreservation companies would have all sorts of legal obligations to provide for you upon reanimation, but what good would that be if you were revived in a hundred years to find that the definition of human has been flipped on its head?  Cryopreservation seems like such a shot in the dark to me.  What do you wanna miss these years for, anyway!?  The next century is almost certain to be unlike anything the earth has ever seen, and I wanna be there for that shit.


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#38
Casey

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^ Good call.  I'm sure cryopreservation companies would have all sorts of legal obligations to provide for you upon reanimation, but what good would that be if you were revived in a hundred years to find that the definition of human has been flipped on its head?  Cryopreservation seems like such a shot in the dark to me.  What do you wanna miss these years for, anyway!?  The next century is almost certain to be unlike anything the earth has ever seen, and I wanna be there for that shit.

 

I think cryopreservation is more of a consideration for those who have to use it; namely, those who are going to die before the era of indefinite lifespans. I would most certainly prefer to live throughout the entire century rather than have a large chunk of missing years, also.

 

The idea of being unable to adjust to the future is an interesting one, and I'm sure that some people would indeed find themselves miserable and unable to adjust. Humans are highly adaptable creatures, though, and I think that with time (perhaps a lot of it) and the proper accomodations, things would turn out okay. One thing I've thought idly about doing (it's way too far in the future to give any serious consideration) is, if my parents are frozen for 10 or 20 years, writing a small history guide for them, explaining the developments on a year-by-year basis  in technology, social issues, and the personal lives of family members (with maybe 3-5 paragraphs per year). Those revived in the future can also be sheltered from any huge culture shock at first by bringing them to an area that's familiar to him and won't provoke any freakouts or future shock... say for example, an old man is cryopreserved in 2013 and revived in 2050. He is returned to his old home after being revived, a home that's full of loved ones and decorated with the familiar technology of 2013 rather than the new, confusing technology of 2050.

 

I think futurists might be more equipped of adjusting to such a radically different world, on that note, because we've already opened up our minds to such a concept. I remember feeling really overwhelmed and disoriented the first time I read FutureTimeline December 2011; being a futurist for the past 13 months has trained me somewhat for being able to accept an incredible amount of change.



#39
SG-1

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I don't think its an issue.

 

We won't be reviving people in 200 years.  There will be no need for cryopreservation in probably just 100 years.  Anyway, that amount of time is going to bring some serious technologies but language won't be radically different, think about someone from 1813, you could hold a conversation with them just don't use any slang.

 

Plus, transhuman technologies like artificial neurons, mind uploading, implants and such will greatly expand the intelligence of a person.  Allowing them to learn and cope with foreign ideas easily.  Neurons getting used up (by your mid 20s) is the reason it is harder for an adult to learn new concepts than it is for a child or teenager.  It can still be done, but with extra neurons we could get a huge advantage.

 

I can't see anyone being revived after it is useless to put someone in the freezer.  They would be taken out and integrated into society just fine.  They will have nice interest gains in their bank accounts if money still exists too.


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#40
Alric

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People have taught apes and stuff to talk with sign language. In fact I am sure there are several species of animals that could probably learn to speak with us if they were physically changed to be able to vocalize a human language. So I don't think it really matters how advanced people in the future might be, you will surely be able to communicate with them, giving sufficient time.

 

I find it hard to imagine that anyone revived are going to be totally unable to adapt, no matter how far into the future you go. Worst case scenario you are not going to be any worse off that a child, and will just need to go back to an early school level or something.






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