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Any of you fellow futurists getting Cryopreserved when you die?


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51 replies to this topic

#41
Antevorta

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I think instead of investing our time and effort into cryopreservation, we are better off investing our efforts in nanotechnology and finding ways to ensure the infinitude of our lives and intellect. Cryopreservation almost seems as if we are putting off the work we need to do today for tomorrow. Or as if we are placing the responsibility of developing the necessary technology to live forever on those in the future. Progression begins with us, presently.

 

 

We should aim to live forever, rather than settling for death in hopes that we'll be revived. One reason being that progression would probably happen faster if we didn't have to keep teaching new generations of people information that is already understood. Procreation won't be necessary if we can live forever, allowing us to focus our attention on our goals and ultimately progress at a faster rate. Children kinda slow us down…. Teaching is almost a distraction. It halts the progression of a person that has an understanding of whatever information, and redirects their focus into regurgitating that information to others, as opposed to building upon that information. 

 

For example, what if Einstein were able to live forever? He probably would have figured out… like...everything there is to know, while we now are still trying to learn what the hell he was even talking about. Let alone build off of it. (Edit: I mean... we have built upon it, but he probably could have done that way sooner... i don't know, maybe this was a bad example).

 

And if advancements in nanotechnology allow us to live forever, then well.... we won't die in the first place.

 

I can't really see what use humanity in the future would have for more people from the past, other than maybe if some catastrophic event takes place that knocks out most of humanity and we need to repopulate. 

 
 
 

Edited by Antevorta, 24 January 2013 - 01:43 AM.

The future is a revolution against the present

 

#42
SG-1

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The reason cryopreservation exists is because there are old people and probably even you who won't be around to see the fruits of longevity research or implementation.  It doesn't matter if we have to teach them, because:

  • Education will be done by AI, maybe even VR to show how history progressed after they died, but I don't think it will be that big of a culture shock.
  • Real research will be done by AI, or transhumans
  • Money won't be a problem when it comes to supporting life, food, drink, shelter, clothing and entertainment will be available for virtually nothing

Do you really think cutting cryopreservation will make research into longevity go faster?  These researchers get paid to do their work, they don't do it just for themselves.  Also, if you look at how many people are actually preserving themselves the number is very small.  Hardly anyone is preserved or plans to be at the moment.  So it won't be billions of stupid cavemen being brought back.  Even if that were the case, I say bring them back! They were the generation that made whatever present possible, they are intelligent, conscious human beings, it isn't putting anyone at danger or costing much to keep them alive and educating them will be free and no one will need to do any work for them in regards to feeding, clothing providing shelter or educating them.

 

I get the feeling you are very cynical and/or pessimistic about the future and the value of human life.  I could be wrong though, I'm just saying what I think.


Edited by SG-1, 24 January 2013 - 01:51 AM.

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#43
Casey

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I understand what you mean in regards to nanotech being superior to cryotech, and cryopreservation would be fairly pointless if all the world's people were promised the chance to reach the age of nanomedicine, but given that even the most generous estimates place nanotechnology as being an advent of the later 2020s, there needs to be a bridge for those who can't possibly hope to reach the nano years. Cryotechnology also needs to advance for the sake of reviving those who have already been frozen; cryopreservation was first performed before nanotechnology was even conceived, it would be tragic for those who have been preserved for over 30 or 40 years to never see their dream of revivification be realized.



#44
Antevorta

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I see why you get that impression, but no, I don't think I'm all that pessimistic about the future and the value of human life. I value it very much.... so much so that I think we should work on living forever. I'm not saying cryopreservation is a bad thing, I just don't think it's our best option. 

 

The future is a revolution against the present

 

#45
SG-1

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Agreed


Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#46
Antevorta

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Just to add, we would need molecular nanotechnology to unfreeze those bodies. 

 

The future is a revolution against the present

 

#47
wjfox

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http://www.huffingto..._hp_ref=science



#48
FutureOfToday

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I doubt I'd ever be able to get the money for this, but if I did ever win the lottery, I'd love to give this a go. Suddenly waking up centuries in the future would be absolutely immense! If I can't afford it, which is far more likely, I'd rather be cremated. (I've heard loads of stories of people "waking up" at their funerals, and I'd hate to wake up in a coffin 10 feet underground.)



#49
razer1994

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I will definitely get cryo-preserved. Even if it does not work, you are dead, what's there to loose?

#50
CLB

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I'd probably aim for living forever, but cryo-preservation is a a good fallback plan.

If something I say sounds like trolling/being stupid/offensive, please forgive me. I'm bad with people.


#51
Squillimy

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well i don't know if they'll still call it cyropreservation in a sense once i need to get preserved because ii was born in 1993 (im 19 now), and from looking at my family i'm likely to live to around 95. (people in my family live to be very old). so lets just say with improved health of the future around 100. that's the year 2093!!! the presevation methods which'll probably be done with nanotechnology will be much more advanced by that time!


What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#52
SG-1

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Yeah but mother nature is a troll. You can think you have great genes and then realize your colon is full of cancer cells one morning.

My grandma and great are still alive. My great-great g-ma died at 103, her mom at 103. 

But there have been people who got cancer, no heart attacks but cancer.

 

Cancer worries me, it can literally strike at any time and is pretty much terminal.  That's all my family has died of, and my 23 year old cousin got it, but survived.

 

On topic: I plan to be preserved.  I hope to be preserved alive rather than wait until I die though.  Just in case.


Edited by SG-1, 03 April 2013 - 04:06 AM.

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