Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

The price of genome sequencing


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1
Casey

Casey

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 681 posts

According to FutureTimeline, by the end of 2014 genome sequencing will be so cheap that one person can get their entire genome read for under $100. I just stumbled upon an article a few minutes ago, though ( http://www.forbes.co...he-1000-genome/ ) saying that the cheapest human genomes cost $25,000-$75,000 and that this isn't going to change any time soon.

 

What do. Out of these two wildly divergent viewpoints, which do you think is the correct one? Is that guy at Forbes just one of those overly pessimistics, linear-thinking naysayers?



#2
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,003 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

Well I got many of my genes tested by a company recently for $100. It's not a complete genome but it's very detailed in what it can tell me.

 

The way they are doing this is they use a specially designed chip that looks at genetic markers they ask the designers to make on their model of the chip to detect sequences they have the data on.

 

Another company offering a similar service charges 2-300 for a similar testing with slightly different goals of detection and can get their chips manufacture for their needs.

 

As the ability to design these chips improve, and the list of requestable tracking sites for genes expands... I see no reason why in the next 24 months that the laws of accelerating returns couldn't get that taken care of. I'd say it's almost a garentee if you are willing to allow seven more months and wiggle room to about $300.

 

this is the chip the company I used uses with some customized identifiers. http://www.illumina...._infiniumhd.pdf


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#3
Casey

Casey

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 681 posts

Thanks for the info, jagg. If the worst-case scenario (more or less) is a full sequencing of the genome for $300 by mid-2015, that's a wonderful thing.

 

So, I'm wondering - can someone summarize all the benefits of sequencing your genome? I'm guessing that it answers the question of which genetic diseases you're predisposed to acquiring; what other information does it provide? Of all the world's diseases, around what percentage are genetic? A majority, a significant minority, or a small minority? 

 

Just trying to grasp the precise reach of how far understanding one's genome can bring a person. I'm very glad that such developments are on the near horizon, at any rate; I get the impression that thanks to genome sequencing, people will gain much more control over their health and a far deeper sense of security, to the point where those who lived during the 2000s were almost defenseless in comparison to the Genome Generation of the 2010s.


Edited by Casey, 06 February 2013 - 08:05 AM.


#4
Craven

Craven

    Elephant in the forest

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,325 posts
  • LocationPoland, Cracow

I'd add, that one of fantastic things about it is, that once you have it sequenced, you don't need to repeat this procedure again. If you do it in 2015, and in 2020 someone discovers that people with ABC gene are at risk of disease FGH, so they shouldn't eat carrots, then you just put your blu-ray with your DNA sequence and check if you have this ABC gene. If you have it... no more carrots for you.

 

Easy and simple.


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#5
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,003 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

Carrier status is your ability to pass on to your offspring something, which means you might carry it silently without signs but your children might present with the condition, traits is what it sounds like, disease risk is pretty straight forward, and drug responses tell you if you are likely to benefit from things like blood pressure meds, or at risk of developing side effects from a med.  It's important to keep in mind that most of these are based on the idea that most people with these conditions also had these genes, it doesn't mean not having them means you're safe, or that having them means you'll get the condition.

 

I'm actually at a lower risk of crohn's and colitis than the average population. My odds for crohn's is 0.35%, the average is 0.53%. But I still have the disease. It's a shitty lottery to win. And it's also important to note that some of the things indicated more certain than others. Especially when one takes into account the effects of environment.

 

another personal note. Statistically I should have 72% chance of blue eyes, 27% green, 1% brown. My eyes are Hazel, which really means green base with some brown and a bit of amber color woven in, it also means depending on surrounding colors and circulation my eyes can shift color a bit.

 

well this is a list of the markers my test checked:

Carrier Status (49)

ARSACS *
Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum with Peripheral Neuropathy (ACCPN) *
Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency *
Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease *
BRCA Cancer Mutations (Selected) *
Beta Thalassemia *
Bloom's Syndrome *
Canavan Disease *
Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Type 1a (PMM2-CDG) *
Connexin 26-Related Sensorineural Hearing Loss *
Cystic Fibrosis *
D-Bifunctional Protein Deficiency *
DPD Deficiency *
Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Deficiency *
Factor XI Deficiency *
Familial Dysautonomia *
Familial Hypercholesterolemia Type B *
Familial Hyperinsulinism (ABCC8-related) *
Familial Mediterranean Fever *
Fanconi Anemia (FANCC-related) *
G6PD Deficiency *
GRACILE Syndrome *
Gaucher Disease *
Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1a *
Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1b *
Hemochromatosis (HFE-related) *
Hereditary Fructose Intolerance *
Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (MYBPC3 25bp-deletion) *
LAMB3-related Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa *
Leigh Syndrome, French Canadian Type (LSFC) *
Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophy *
Maple Syrup Urine Disease Type 1B *
Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency *
Mucolipidosis IV *
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN5-related) *
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (PPT1-related) *
Niemann-Pick Disease Type A *
Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome *
Pendred Syndrome *
Phenylketonuria *
Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 2 (PH2) *
Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata Type 1 (RCDP1) *
Salla Disease *
Sickle Cell Anemia & Malaria Resistance *
TTR-Related Cardiac Amyloidosis *
Tay-Sachs Disease *
Torsion Dystonia *
Tyrosinemia Type I *
Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum *

Drug Response (21)

Abacavir Hypersensitivity *
Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Risk of Esophageal Cancer *
Antidepressant Response
Beta-Blocker Response
Caffeine Metabolism
Clopidogrel (Plavix®) Efficacy *
Floxacillin Toxicity
Fluorouracil Toxicity *
Hepatitis C Treatment Side Effects
Heroin Addiction
Lumiracoxib (Prexige®) Side Effects
Metformin Response
Naltrexone Treatment Response
Oral Contraceptives, Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism *
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV)
Pseudocholinesterase Deficiency *
Response to Hepatitis C Treatment *
Response to Interferon Beta Therapy
Statin Response
Thiopurine Methyltransferase Deficiency *
Warfarin (Coumadin®) Sensitivity *

Traits (57)

Adiponectin Levels
Alcohol Flush Reaction *
Asparagus Metabolite Detection
Avoidance of Errors
Birth Weight
Bitter Taste Perception *
Blood Glucose
Breast Morphology
Breastfeeding and IQ
C-reactive Protein Level
Caffeine Consumption
Chronic Hepatitis B
Earwax Type *
Eating Behavior
Eye Color *
Eye Color: Preliminary Research
Food Preference
Freckling
HDL ("Good") Cholesterol Levels
HIV Progression
Hair Color
Hair Curl *
Hair Curl: Preliminary Research
Hair Thickness
Height
Hypospadias
Iris Patterns
LDL ("Bad") Cholesterol Levels
Lactose Intolerance *
Leprosy Susceptibility
Longevity
Malaria Complications
Malaria Resistance (Duffy Antigen) *
Male Pattern Baldness *
Male Pattern Baldness: Preliminary Research
Measures of Intelligence
Measures of Obesity
Memory
Menarche
Menopause
Muscle Performance *
Nearsightedness and Farsightedness
Non-ABO Blood Groups *
Norovirus Resistance *
Odor Detection
Pain Sensitivity
Persistent Fetal Hemoglobin
Photic Sneeze Reflex
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Reading Ability
Resistance to HIV/AIDS *
Response to Diet
Response to Exercise
Sex Hormone Regulation
Smoking Behavior *
Tooth Development
Tuberculosis Susceptibility

Disease Risk (120)

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Age-related Macular Degeneration *
Alcohol Dependence
Alopecia Areata
Alzheimer's Disease *
Alzheimer's Disease: Preliminary Research
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Asthma
Atopic Dermatitis
Atrial Fibrillation *
Atrial Fibrillation: Preliminary Research
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Back Pain
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Behçet's Disease
Bipolar Disorder *
Bipolar Disorder: Preliminary Research
Bladder Cancer
Brain Aneurysm
Breast Cancer *
Breast Cancer Risk Modifiers
Celiac Disease *
Celiac Disease: Preliminary Research
Chronic Kidney Disease *
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate
Cluster Headaches
Colorectal Cancer *
Coronary Heart Disease *
Coronary Heart Disease: Preliminary Research
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Crohn's Disease *
Developmental Dyslexia
Dupuytren's Disease
Endometriosis
Esophageal Cancer: Preliminary Research
Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ESCC) *
Essential Tremor
Exfoliation Glaucoma *
Follicular Lymphoma
Gallstones *
Generalized Vitiligo
Gestational Diabetes
Glaucoma: Preliminary Research
Gout
Hashimoto's Thyroiditis
Hay Fever (Allergic Rhinitis)
Heart Rhythm Disorders (Arrhythmias)
High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)
Hodgkin Lymphoma
Hypertriglyceridemia
Hypothyroidism
Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy
Keloid
Kidney Cancer
Kidney Disease
Kidney Stones
Larynx Cancer
Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)
Lung Cancer *
Lupus (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus) *
Male Breast Cancer
Male Infertility
Melanoma *
Melanoma: Preliminary Research
Meningioma
Migraines
Multiple Sclerosis *
Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
Narcolepsy
Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
Neural Tube Defects
Neuroblastoma
Nicotine Dependence
Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Obesity *
Obesity: Preliminary Research
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Oral and Throat Cancer
Osteoarthritis
Otosclerosis
Ovarian Cancer
Paget's Disease of Bone
Pancreatic cancer
Parkinson's Disease *
Parkinson's Disease: Preliminary Research
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Placental Abruption
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Preeclampsia
Primary Biliary Cirrhosis *
Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Preliminary Research
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Prostate Cancer *
Psoriasis *
Restless Legs Syndrome *
Restless Legs Syndrome: Preliminary Research
Rheumatoid Arthritis *
Sarcoidosis
Sarcoma
Schizophrenia
Scleroderma (Limited Cutaneous Type) *
Scoliosis
Selective IgA Deficiency
Sjögren's Syndrome
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stomach Cancer (Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma) *
Stomach Cancer: Preliminary Research
Stroke
Sudden Cardiac Arrest
Tardive Dyskinesia
Testicular Cancer
Thyroid Cancer
Tourette's Syndrome
Type 1 Diabetes *
Type 2 Diabetes *
Ulcerative Colitis *
Uterine Fibroids
Venous Thromboembolism *


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#6
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,003 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

oh and it can also track certain traits through regions of most common appearance. Basically as humans spread through the world, each time they went a new direction from the rest of the family, new features would emerge (large nose, bushy eyebrows, attached earlobes ect) and these traits serve as markers for times and places that one family differenciated from another. So they can indicate areas of time and places where your genes may come from. Like in my case, on my fathers side (they can only check fathers side through the Y chromasone, so unfortunately ladies don't get as detailed a reading on heritage) 70+% of that particular group in the world occurs only in the north western region of Ireland, and it drops off rapidly after that. west coast England sees it in only about 3% of the population.

 

Not all family lines will be that sharp a contrast, as some are more common than others, but it's interesting to find out.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#7
Italian Ufo

Italian Ufo

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,190 posts

Sounds awesome this mean that we are in a step foward to personilzed medicine which is what patients really need for care.



#8
Casey

Casey

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 681 posts

Wow, I never would have imagined that genome sequencing tests so many things; the only category of those I thought it tested was Disease Risk. Since Lupus is listed there, does that mean Lupus can theoretically be cured using gene therapy? (I know that no such treatment exists in the present day.) Or would that not be enough to rid one's body of the illness since genetics is only one facet of Lupus? My sister has Lupus, and I really wish that something existed that could help her be healthy again. There were times back in the early 2000s where her boyfriend would have to carry her inside after work because just performing a regular job stressed out her body so much that it became a wreck.



#9
Craven

Craven

    Elephant in the forest

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,325 posts
  • LocationPoland, Cracow

Dunno how many of you heard about those twins i France. One of them did some sexual assaults and they'll be doing deep DNA testing to determine which. It's supposed to cost millions. How's that possible with all those news about sequencing prices going way down?


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users