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Would you swap a healthy eye for a bionic one with additional functionality?


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66 replies to this topic

#1
Italian Ufo

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Posted Image

 
 
This is an intresting article/debate to read
 
I would like to know members opinion on this issue.
 
 
 
 

 



#2
Casey

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I think that, whenever I start upgrading my body (probably a few decades after the introduction of such surgeries and technologies, to make sure they're safe and to wait for the price to go down), the eyes will likely be one of the last things I touch. I've had 20/20 vision ever since undergoing lasic surgery six years ago, and the eyes are already one of the most perfect and reliable parts of the human body. Once the time comes, though, absolutely. If I live until the 22nd century, I'm not sure there will be much left of me that's 'natural.'


Edited by Casey, 19 February 2013 - 02:51 AM.


#3
MiowaraTomokato

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If I had the means to, yes. Why wouldn't you? I've worn glasses my entire life. Would I like a set of eyes that can do more than a normal set, will last longer, and never go bad?

 

Yes. A thousand times yes.



#4
Alric

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I think almost everyone but the purest who never want to upgrade anything would be in favor of it. It is just a matter of timing. A lot of people don't want to go first, and we want some guarantees it is safe and reliable but other than that how can you not think it is cool to have super enhanced eyes?



#5
SG-1

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As soon as I can afford it and know it is safe.


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#6
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Considering that laser eye surgery still isn't very affordable, is still rather dicey, and wears off after a year or so, I can assure that bionic eyes will not be cheap or safe enough within my lifetime. Now, technology develops faster with each passing generation, so I could be wrong. But as it stands, our technology won't be able to repair or replace the human eye effectively for a long time. The human body is very complex, and even the mid-21st century is way too early to create any kind of technology that can not only replace a body part, but improve on it.


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#7
SG-1

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No it isn't.  Laser eye surgery is not the same thing as a bionic eye, you can't compare the two.

 

I would be surprised if there weren't any augmentations that would improve the human body by the 22nd century. 

I wouldn't be surprised if people were upgrading their eyes in the 2040s.


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#8
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Well, I compared the two because as of today, laser eye surgery is the best technology we have that improves human eye sight. And I'm not saying people won't be upgrading their eyes by the mid-21st Century. What I meant is that medical technology tends to progress slower because human body is extremely complicated.

 

For several decades we'll still be dealing with these kinds of issues:

- Can you afford it? Will your insurance cover it?

- What if something isn't connected right or there's an issue during operation? What if part of your brain or face is unintentionally damaged due to some sort of error? You're screwed; you've had your eyes removed and now your bionic eyes don't work.

- What if your body rejects the bionic eyes? How well will technology be able to ensure that that won't happen?

- What if something in your bionic eye comes loose, and part of it ends up piercing a nerve or creating an internal wound, and you don't even notice it?

- How long is the adjustment period? How long will it take for tech advancements to decrease the adjustment period? Will you have to stay home for a week or 3 days after the operation to ensure your own safety and the safety of others?

 

Even though I'm myopic, bionic eyes still won't be worth replacing my real eyes for decades. It's possible, but not very likely, that I'd be able to very affordably and safely replace my eyes with two machines that are vastly superior to the eyes I already have - with a tiny margin of error at that. Bionic eyes are only going to get better and better as time progresses, and they will likely be very flawed when they first emerge. And to that end, it probably won't be a fully established and reliable technology for a really long time.

 

And yeah, in the 22nd Century we'll no doubt have amazingly superior human body augmentations. But my last post was about what I expect to see within my lifetime, and even with increasing life expectancy I'll still probably have one foot in the grave by the year 2100.


Edited by Username, 19 February 2013 - 04:25 AM.

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#9
Italian Ufo

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I think that, whenever I start upgrading my body (probably a few decades after the introduction of such surgeries and technologies, to make sure they're safe and to wait for the price to go down), the eyes will likely be one of the last things I touch. I've had 20/20 vision ever since undergoing lasic surgery six years ago, and the eyes are already one of the most perfect and reliable parts of the human body. Once the time comes, though, absolutely. If I live until the 22nd century, I'm not sure there will be much left of me that's 'natural.'

You write it Lasik lol  This surgery may become obsolate after 2020.

I dont think I would ever replace my entire eyes..they are to beautiful.

What I would do is to put some powerful glasses or some lenses who will be much more confortable to the ones we have now. Genetic Engeneering may also help to have a Hawk site for example



#10
Italian Ufo

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I think almost everyone but the purest who never want to upgrade anything would be in favor of it. It is just a matter of timing. A lot of people don't want to go first, and we want some guarantees it is safe and reliable but other than that how can you not think it is cool to have super enhanced eyes?

lol it remembers me of this



#11
Italian Ufo

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Well, I compared the two because as of today, laser eye surgery is the best technology we have that improves human eye sight. And I'm not saying people won't be upgrading their eyes by the mid-21st Century. What I meant is that medical technology tends to progress slower because human body is extremely complicated.

 

.

 

Laser surgery is not the best medical technology we have. There are also intralocular lenses. Genetic therapy and some eyes that may change the shape of the eye are also under way according to some recent article. So if you are myopic you can have soon much better vision.

 

As for what year I see this happening. Maybe some first brave people may do it at the end of 80s or early 90s but it will be still very rare.



#12
zEVerzan

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It depends. If it would change my appearance, no.

 

Here's why.

 

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBxA1GTunyI"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBxA1GTunyI[/url]

 

If it would not change my appearance, then I would. There's no rush though, my eyes are fine.


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#13
Squillimy

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id definitely do it! i have had perfect vision since birth, but why not upgrade just because i can? I'd imagine at one point not only would bionic eyes have better resolution and color recognition, but eventually you'd be able to do things like zoom in and out with these, also maybe even have some fun and see on different color spectrums and maybe even thermal view! also with these new computer like eyes, augmented reality would be alot easier this way than putting it on a contact lense or some glasses, in my opinion.

 

it'd be bad ass to see a picture from far away, and simply zoom in to see it, then just click default to return back to your vision like a hawk. Or to see human beings through walls simply do thermal vision to tell where they are. the possibilities are endless!


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#14
Casey

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Well, I compared the two because as of today, laser eye surgery is the best technology we have that improves human eye sight. And I'm not saying people won't be upgrading their eyes by the mid-21st Century. What I meant is that medical technology tends to progress slower because human body is extremely complicated.

 

.

 

Laser surgery is not the best medical technology we have. There are also intralocular lenses. Genetic therapy and some eyes that may change the shape of the eye are also under way according to some recent article. So if you are myopic you can have soon much better vision.

 

As for what year I see this happening. Maybe some first brave people may do it at the end of 80s or early 90s but it will be still very rare.

 

Do you mean that people won't begin upgrading their natural eyes to bionic ones until the late 2080s-early 2090s? That sounds a little excessive to me even if you assume linear progress rather than exponential. The first bionic eyes were put in last year and were a success; the early 2090s are eighty years away. Your guess basically means that it would take 80 years for them to begin making their very first baby dents in society. I can't think of any modern innovation that proliferates at that glacially slow a pace. Ford started making automobiles in 1914 and they were ubiquitous within 50 years, the ARPANet was created in 1969 and the internet started becoming a household item in the mid-90s, etc.

 

Considering that laser eye surgery still isn't very affordable, is still rather dicey, and wears off after a year or so

 

I can agree with those first two points, but I'm not sure about the third - do you mean that one's vision begins making a slow decline after one year, or that it quickly reverts to its pre-surgery state? I and the people I know might just be lucky, but we've all had stable results from the surgery. My vision is 20/20 just like it was the day after I got the surgery in April 2007 (A nice change considering that beforehand, I was 20/400 in one eye and 20/700 in the other!), and my brother-in-law is still 20/15 despite getting the procedure done in 2001.



#15
StanleyAlexander

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^ My uncle had it done over ten years ago, and he hasn't experienced any loss in vision quality at all.

 

My eyes have been going downhill my whole life.  I'm happy with contacts & glasses though, until bionic eyes get to that stage where they are affordable and work very well.  I'd look for that scenario in about 25 years--2030's, maybe.


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#16
Italian Ufo

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Do you mean that people won't begin upgrading their natural eyes to bionic ones until the late 2080s-early 2090s? That sounds a little excessive to me even if you assume linear progress rather than exponential. The first bionic eyes were put in last year and were a success; the early 2090s are eighty years away. Your guess basically means that it would take 80 years for them to begin making their very first baby dents in society. I can't think of any modern innovation that proliferates at that glacially slow a pace. Ford started making automobiles in 1914 and they were ubiquitous within 50 years, the ARPANet was created in 1969 and the internet started becoming a household item in the mid-90s, etc.

 

By bionic eyes Do you mean retinal implant as been implanted last year? thats what they mean for bionic eyes nowdays.

I say that the very first bionic eyes will implant so late because here we are not talking about repairing the function of one organ. We are talking about replacing healthy organ  with another artificial organs to have super capabilities. So my first question is how many will go to spontaneous mutilation in few decades?  I dont think that this will be accepted in the medical culture of patients for very long. Also, how much will cost? and what social consequences would this augmentations have on society and social equality?

Again I think that the comparison betwen human body and cars is not appropriate because of the complexity of human culture and the human body.

 

Also how pratical are these bionic eyes? while dont just we enhance retina potential or create lenses or develop a genetic therapy that will give us eagle eyes.

In my opinion cyborgs will be only something temporary in human history. The far future will be all biological.



#17
Italian Ufo

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^ My uncle had it done over ten years ago, and he hasn't experienced any loss in vision quality at all.

 

My eyes have been going downhill my whole life.  I'm happy with contacts & glasses though, until bionic eyes get to that stage where they are affordable and work very well.  I'd look for that scenario in about 25 years--2030's, maybe.

Yeah I know people who had laser surgery since the late 80s. It was very sperimental and controversial then and without the technology and safety we have today, Still for this person the surgery was a real success. More then 20s later  he is still 10/10



#18
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Considering that laser eye surgery still isn't very affordable, is still rather dicey, and wears off after a year or so

 

 

I can agree with those first two points, but I'm not sure about the third - do you mean that one's vision begins making a slow decline after one year, or that it quickly reverts to its pre-surgery state? I and the people I know might just be lucky, but we've all had stable results from the surgery. My vision is 20/20 just like it was the day after I got the surgery in April 2007 (A nice change considering that beforehand, I was 20/400 in one eye and 20/700 in the other!), and my brother-in-law is still 20/15 despite getting the procedure done in 2001.

 

Oh, about my third point. Some people face vision regression a few years after laser eye surgery. After looking it up, this is actually rarer than I thought (and it's sometimes just caused by the eyes growing over time, not a flaw with the laser surgery), so that's probably not a valid point. Never mind, then.

 

 

 

So my first question is how many will go to spontaneous mutilation in few decades?  I dont think that this will be accepted in the medical culture of patients for very long. Also, how much will cost?

 

I agree that bionic eyes would not be widespread in a decade or two. There are just too many risks with a young technology like that. However, there are always some rich and stupid (or blind and curious/desperate) people who would be willing to immediately jump on the bandwagon. Of course, there's the question of whether or not the medical community will allow it.


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#19
Italian Ufo

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FDA may become also less relevant with personlized medicine? Would you guys think? Already now within the US I see clinics appling stem cells without FDA approvals?

I wouldnt be surprised if a company similar to the fictionl Sarif starts to sell implants and then says in their condition (it is not FDA approved but many of our customers already have benefits from it).

I also think that some paralelal organs to FDA will start to emerge after the 30s.



#20
Alric

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There is over 200,000 people with cochlear implants, which lets deaf people hear. There is also at least 80,000 people who brain implants used for treatment of Dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease. There is now prosthetic limbs that can be controlled directly by the brain. So it is coming, and it will not take as long as some think.

 

I think Italian Ufo makes a good point. There isn't any reason to remove the entire eye if you can greatly improve eyesight in other ways. For example what if they wanted to implant a micro thin transparent lens, and that lens could amplify the clarity of everything you saw or something. With the super tiny electronics in the future it is certainly possible you could do all sort of things with a very thin lens, and it would be more effective than replacing the entire eye.






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