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Ancient Rome General Discussion Thread

Roman Era Ancient Rome Antiquity Ancient Greece Rome Europe Mediterranean

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#1
Italian Ufo

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Archaeologists have presented the completed excavation of a 900-seat auditorium under Rome's Piazza Venezia (Venice Square), which they are hailing as the city's most significant discovery since the Roman Forum was unearthed 80 years ago.

 

http://www.wantedinr...ry-in-rome.html



#2
Time_Traveller

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Well thats what i call a find and people could see now and in the future.


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#3
Italian Ufo

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that came as a result of the built of the new underground.

In Rome as soon as you dig you find some ancient staff: theaters, vases, coins, mosaic and so on..

Thats the reason some consturcitions of underground got interropted a few times..

anyway...thats surprising.. the square right now is the heart Rome but in ancient tmes it was the boder of the city.

there was also a lake there that got shrinks over the centuries.

Thats the point where the auditorium was found

Posted Image



#4
Time_Traveller

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Posted Image

 

An archaeological dig in the heart of the City "will transform our understanding" of Roman London, experts claim.

 

About 10,000 finds have been discovered, including writing tablets and good luck charms.

 

The area has been dubbed the "Pompeii of the north" due to the perfect preservation of organic

artefacts such as leather and wood.

 

One expert said: "This is the site that we have been dreaming of for 20 years."

 

Archaeologists expect the finds, at the three-acre site, to provide the earliest foundation date for Roman London, currently AD 47.

 

The site will house media corporation Bloomberg's European headquarters.

 

It contains the bed of the Walbrook, one of the "lost" rivers of London, and features built-up soil waterfronts and timber structures,

 

including a complex Roman drainage system used to discharge waste from industrial buildings.

 

Organic materials such as leather and wood were preserved in an anaerobic environment, due to the bed being waterlogged.

 

From http://www.bbc.co.uk...london-22084384

 

Wow, thats alot of Archaeological items to find from the Roman Era especially from London.


Edited by Time_Traveller, 10 April 2013 - 10:59 AM.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#5
Colonel O'Neil

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10,000!


The art of forgetting is inherent in human minds; the art of being forgotten  is the normal fate of knowing. We as futurists don't accept that. In the panels of the Universe, we alone will remain standing; remain unforgotten.


#6
Italian Ufo

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I am always proud to say that my ancestors where the funders of London. Last year I stupid lady was insultin forgeiners in the underground, targetting even me because I was speaking in Italian to my parents. She was singing all this stupid nationalist British songs, at one moment I stopped her and asked her...Do you know who are the founders of London? She said no...I told her Romans! Italians you so disprege...

she remained silent she then apologized with all the immigrants on the train and to me too...i simply told her that she should apologize with herself before apologizing to others. My dad also filmed her and He wanted to put her on youtube and send to prison. just like it happned in few circumstance. this is one.

 

 

 

Anyway despite I am not really a forgiver, I have a big heart and I do forgive sometimes. So I let her go...we all make mistakes in life.

 

 

 

 

Apart from this narrative, I also visited a Mitra temple in London built by the Romans. it was found only few years ago. it is quite intresting. I hope they found more Roman ruins in the year to come.


Edited by Italian Ufo, 10 April 2013 - 01:49 PM.


#7
SG-1

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Wow that is cool. It would be nice to find those in America though in South America there are ruins of Mayan civilization. Italian, I'm impressed you forgive her. I've developed a low tolerance for people like that. They surely don't deserve forgiveness for being so ignorant.

Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#8
sweetwilliam

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@ItalianUfo

 

Lol I saw this video when it went viral, funny that you were involved :D

 

Guess it's a small internet, small world.

 

 

Anyways, it is really interesting that the foundation of London was in large parts due to the Romans, and just proves how much their architecture and culture made a basis for future states that are alive and kicking to this day


The only sovereign you can allow to rule you is reason..... Faith and feelings are the darkness to reason's light

- Richard Rahl and Zeddicus Zorander, protagonists in the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind


#9
FutureOfToday

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I am always proud to say that my ancestors where the funders of London. Last year I stupid lady was insultin forgeiners in the underground, targetting even me because I was speaking in Italian to my parents. She was singing all this stupid nationalist British songs, at one moment I stopped her and asked her...Do you know who are the founders of London? She said no...I told her Romans! Italians you so disprege...she remained silent she then apologized with all the immigrants on the train and to me too...i simply told her that she should apologize with herself before apologizing to others. My dad also filmed her and He wanted to put her on youtube and send to prison. just like it happned in few circumstance. this is one. [/url] Anyway despite I am not really a forgiver, I have a big heart and I do forgive sometimes. So I let her go...we all make mistakes in life. Apart from this narrative, I also visited a Mitra temple in London built by the Romans. it was found only few years ago. it is quite intresting. I hope they found more Roman ruins in the year to come.

Very well done for saying that! The Romans founded Londinium and so it is definitely an Italian city, and the Romans did do a lot of good throughout Europe despite their sometimes bad reputation.

#10
Ru1138

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Wow that is cool. It would be nice to find those in America


Here's some ruins that might interest you:

http://www.cahokiamounds.org/

And that's in the state I live in! Though I live in Chicago which is pretty far from Cahokia.


Edited by Ru1138, 14 April 2013 - 10:08 PM.

What difference does it make?


#11
SG-1

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Your link goes to this page, but I copy and pasted it lol

That's pretty cool.  I don't know about the other members but I like History about as much as I do the future. 

http://www.paleofuture.com/ <--pretty interesting website, unrelated to Rome.

 

Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#12
Ru1138

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Your link goes to this page, but I copy and pasted it lol

That's pretty cool.  I don't know about the other members but I like History about as much as I do the future. 

http://www.paleofuture.com/ <--pretty interesting website, unrelated to Rome.

 

 

History is very interesting. It's incredible to believe that there was a pre-Columbian city in Illinois that, at its peak, was larger than London in 1250 AD!

 

And I believe that I've been to Paleofuture before, but it is an interesting site! :)


What difference does it make?


#13
FutureOfToday

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Yes, history is every bit as interesting as the future, if not more so. I am just fascinated by time in general.

#14
Yuli Ban

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Ancient Roman coins unearthed from castle ruins in Okinawa, Japan

Coins issued in ancient Rome have been excavated from the ruins of a castle in a city in Okinawa Prefecture, the local education board said Monday, the first time such artifacts have been recovered from ruins in Japan.
The education board of the city of Uruma said the four copper coins believed to date back to the Roman Empire in the third to fourth centuries were discovered in the ruins of Katsuren Castle, which existed from the 12th century to the 15th.
Okinawa’s trade with China and the Southeast Asian region was thriving at the time and the finding is “precious historical material suggesting a link between Okinawa and the Western world,” the board said.
Each coin measures 1.6 to 2 centimeters in diameter. The designs and patterns on both sides are unclear due to abrasion.

n-oldcoin-a-20160927-200x200.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#15
Yuli Ban

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The Sexual Assault Case That Shook Ancient Rome

"You say that he raped an actress,” Cicero told the court. “And this is said to have happened at Atina, while he was quite young.”
There was a low, subdued chuckle from the crowd. They were all men — women weren’t allowed inside the courtroom — most from the town of Atina themselves. They’d made the 80-mile trip to support a man they respected, whom they believed had been unfairly accused.
His name was Gnaeus Plancius, and in the year 54 B.C., he was one of the most powerful men in Rome.
It was more than 2,000 years before the #MeToo movement, but a scene similar to the ones we’ve witnessed so often lately was already playing out. A prominent politician was on trial for corruption and bribery, charges bolstered by dirt his enemies had dug up from his past: the violent sexual assault of a young girl.
Those charges of corruption and bribery were a serious matter, but to the men in the court, the rape charge was nothing. It was harmless boys-will-be-boys misbehavior — something half the men there were guilty of themselves.
His lawyer, Cicero, didn’t even bother to deny it. He just threw up his arms in a mock flourish and, to the gleeful delight of the men who surrounded him, declared: “O how elegantly must his youth have been passed! The only thing which is imputed to him is one that there was not much harm in.”
And that was it. Nobody bothered to bring it up again.
Raping an actress, as Cicero assured them, was nothing more than following “a well-established tradition at staged events.”
It was hardly a crime, every man in the courtroom agreed. It was mudslinging; a cheap attack on a decent man’s character, bogging down the process of something that actually mattered: a trial over bribery.
 
“But please,” Cicero said when the chuckling had died down, “let us at last come to the merits of the case.”
The case moved along. The men all but forgot she’d ever even been mentioned. And life went on for everyone but her: that actress, still back home in Atina. The only hint she’d ever lived would be in Cicero’s speech. It would live on for thousands of years, studied by politicians and law students as a brilliant piece of oration — a perfect demonstration of how to shut down people who threw meaningless slander at a decent man.
Her name has been lost to time — nobody bothered to write it down. To the Roman Republic, she was just some whore in Atina who’d flaunted her skin on stage and then acted surprised when a red-blooded man couldn’t control himself.

 
The woman from Atina knew well what the men thought of her. She was an actress — and in Rome in 54 B.C., that made her little more than a prostitute.
It wasn’t a secret. The men didn’t hide how they saw women on the stage. They even worked it into poetry.
“[What] you have with actresses, you have with common strumpets,” the poet Horace wrote. A few years later, the moralist Plutarch would add that consorting “with actresses, harpists, and theatrical people,” was a “mode of life” that would leave them riddled with diseases.
 
Even the men who loved the theater saw the women on stage as little more than sex objects — like the poet Martial, who, after watching a troupe of actresses dance on stage, ran home and wrote a rave review that said: “They would have caused Hippolytus himself to masturbate!”
Women, in those days, weren’t allowed to perform in respectable Greek tragedies on glamorous stages — the female roles were usually played by young boys. Instead, there were mimae: women who put on silent comedy shows, usually stripped down to next to nothing, performing over the jeers of horny men yelling for them to take off the rest of their clothes. And plenty of the girls — if they knew what was good for them — would do just that.
To the men of Rome, these were filthy women — “the lowest level of life,” they were called, right in the nation’s code of law. They got on the stage because they loved to show off their bodies, and they wanted nothing more than to be ogled, harassed and violated by strangers.
That, at least, was how the men saw them — but these women hadn’t chosen their lives. Some had been forced into it when they were still just children, by starving parents with no other way to pay their bills. Most of the rest were slaves.


Rather tragic tale that obviously doesn't end that well, despite the writer's attempts at a hope spot. If it involves women and their rights as humans and it's set any time before the Enlightenment, your batting average will be impossibly high if you just assume "they get fucked over."


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#16
R8Z

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Goes on to show how morals are fluid and a fruit of their time. I dare to say this battle is not a straight up hill either. Things that are unacceptable today might be perfectly normal in the future. Same for the reverse.

Even things as simple and apparently "instantly rejectable" as murder and stealing have been relativized and down-played time and time again in history and even in modern times. Murder has been be justified (revenge? self-defence?). Stealing has been justified (for the common good?).

I sincerely hope we trace a path forward taking care into not hurting "more-than-necessary" innocents in this mess we call human civilization.



#17
Yuli Ban

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






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