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How old do you expect to live to?


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78 replies to this topic

Poll: Age (51 member(s) have cast votes)

How old do you predict you will live to?

  1. Up to 80 years old (6 votes [11.76%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.76%

  2. 80 - 90 years old (4 votes [7.84%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.84%

  3. 90 - 100 years old (2 votes [3.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.92%

  4. 100 - 120 years old (2 votes [3.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.92%

  5. 120 - 150 years old (1 votes [1.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.96%

  6. 150 - 200 years old (3 votes [5.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.88%

  7. 200 - 300 years old (2 votes [3.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.92%

  8. 300 - 400 years old (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. 400 - 500 years old (2 votes [3.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.92%

  10. 500 - 750 years old (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  11. 750 - 1000 years old (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  12. 1000 - 5000 years old (1 votes [1.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.96%

  13. 5000 - 10000 years old (2 votes [3.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.92%

  14. Older than 10000 years (11 votes [21.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.57%

  15. Voted I think I will live forever. (15 votes [29.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 29.41%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#41
WithoutCoincidence

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Actually, it's not an impossibility. You can never say "I have lived forever", but you can live without ever dying, with no end ever to come to your life, provided the technology is available. If you never die, then you are "living forever".

That's the thing though. Statistically speaking, something has to EVENTUALLY happen. Parallel universes, if they're confirmed, may derail that, but they haven't been confirmed yet. Eventually, something has got to happen. Even if it's just your body quantum tunneling itself into every corner of the universe, something eventually has GOT to happen, a combination of incredibly unlikely circumstances coming together to kill you, no matter how well you prepare.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#42
FutureOfToday

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Actually, it's not an impossibility. You can never say "I have lived forever", but you can live without ever dying, with no end ever to come to your life, provided the technology is available. If you never die, then you are "living forever".

That's the thing though. Statistically speaking, something has to EVENTUALLY happen. Parallel universes, if they're confirmed, may derail that, but they haven't been confirmed yet. Eventually, something has got to happen. Even if it's just your body quantum tunneling itself into every corner of the universe, something eventually has GOT to happen, a combination of incredibly unlikely circumstances coming together to kill you, no matter how well you prepare.

It's highly likely that even if it does take billions of years, you will someday die, yes, I see your point. But every problem can be avoided and if it's possible to avoid the problem, it's possible not to die, and if it's always possible not to die, it's possible to never die.



#43
razer1994

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I posted this link here, but some of the new members will probably like it. http://livingto100.c...ivingto100.com/[/url] You have to make an account at the end to see your results but they never send anything to your email.  It's worth it. I get 99, but I can add more years by putting sunscreen on regularly and drinking wine.  In the USA you have to be 21 to drink.  Its a matter of life or death though, I don't see why I can't consume alcohol though.. I don't think this takes technological advancement into consideration, but 1995+99=2094, so by then hopefully some progress has happened lol.  Man, that is a long time from now.  49 years post-singularity.  I wonder how accurate that is?

 All of that assuming you don't inadverently get into an accident. So be very careful!!!

Once you can live forever your chances of unnatural death virtually reach 100%

#44
VRMMORPG

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I just expect to live until mind uploading becomes available to the average people. That´s my goal, to live until my mind could be uploaded and creating my worlds in virtual reality, I am not interested in this reality.



#45
Time_Traveller

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I'm going to say somewhere between 80-90 years old.


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#46
FutureOfToday

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I posted this link here, but some of the new members will probably like it. http://livingto100.c...ivingto100.com/[/url] You have to make an account at the end to see your results but they never send anything to your email.  It's worth it. I get 99, but I can add more years by putting sunscreen on regularly and drinking wine.  In the USA you have to be 21 to drink.  Its a matter of life or death though, I don't see why I can't consume alcohol though.. I don't think this takes technological advancement into consideration, but 1995+99=2094, so by then hopefully some progress has happened lol.  Man, that is a long time from now.  49 years post-singularity.  I wonder how accurate that is?

 All of that assuming you don't inadverently get into an accident. So be very careful!!!

Once you can live forever your chances of unnatural death virtually reach 100%

Once we can live forever, our bodies probably won't be biological anyway, so even if they do for some strange reason fail by themselves, it can't be a natural death.

#47
kjaggard

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I'd say based on genetics my life expectancy should be around 82, but unfortunately I've also got an autoimmune illness. The chronic inflammation builds damage up over time at a faster rate than baseline people. So to reach that age from my current of 35, I'll need some medical advancements in the next ten to fifteen years to see my health controlled back toward baseline.

 

Funnily enough the illness has forced changes in the rest of my health to decrease other health problems to better than baseline.

 

I think If I can make it through the next decade and a half I should be able to reap those benefits to make it past 87. By then we should at least have the tech to swap in new organs for old and damaged ones.

 

I can imagine in fourty years being able to replace my digestive tract, my circulatory system and my lungs with young and healthy versions. Might even be able to do things like kidney and liver too. I might look a bit patchwork as we likely would have to replenish skin and bone and muscle too.

 

That could easily buy me another decade or two. And in that time medicinal science may well advance to the point of being able to prevent actual aging from taking hold but I think there will be thresholds that won't get us passed the 120s to 140s for the genetically blessed already. One of then is how to preserve the brain function from the effects of aging without altering the brain severely enough to cause loss of identity at best and possible siezure and psychosis lasting til death results.

 

I think we will see a fair bit of that. Being able to preserve the look and healthy tissues of a person in their prime of life but destruction of the person within may set in as a sort of lingering failure. Humanity may figure a way through it but I doubt I'm in the age group that will make it through. So I'll likely have the health of a middle aged person until I sort of fade out of it.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#48
Raklian

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Kjaggard, you still have the option of being cyropreserved via vitrification or whatever means we will develop in the next few decades to come.

 

Sometimes, I feel many of us keep forgetting this option when fretting over the possibility of dying before the point medical technology gets advanced enough to escape the longevity velocity. If I have to remind people of this option over and over, I'll do it. :D


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#49
Rkw

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This might be sort of a soft spot Kjaggard, but if for whatever reason you did not manage to last to 80, or even if you did and beyond, would you consider putting yourself into some kind of stasis? Have you considered it?

 

EDIT: Posted that before the previous comment had popped up, oops.


Edited by Rkw, 11 April 2013 - 07:52 PM.


#50
kjaggard

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Years ago I looked at the vitrification process in use by multiple companies and to the best of my knowledge they've not improved it in over a decades time. The process they use is damaging in it's own way and reversal would cause even more damage. It also depends on some organizations whith less than perfect records on conduct and safety in handling, and no really well plotted course to revertion of the frozen.

 

At the time I looked into it, it looked more like "Sign your insurance over to us and we will keep you in a freezer until somebody figures out how to thaw you." And the asking price was just not plausible, considering the extra hoops that many of them make you go through (some charge extra if you don't die in one of their facilities and they have to send a team to where you die).

 

I've actually looked at some of the plasticizing techniques being used in tissue preservation for study and that looks far more promising to me as a means of shape and structure preservation. And ideally we would find a way to minimize damage and reduce toxicity of the process and make it more of a stasis so that we can do it pre death. I don't want a lingering painful death that leaves me further off and having to be 'brought back' I want reasonable diagnosis of decreased capability and quality of life with a recommendation of suspended life and maintainance until medical techniques can be used to repair what problems I have.

 

For that to even appeal I say we need something more in line with the ability to preserve living people, using techniques that have worked and been used to preserve donated tissues for long periods of time and are shown to effectively be reversible with no more tissue or nerve damage than can be encountered and survived by a living person. With those processes in place I'd like to then see the ability to invest in it like an insurance policy directly and that it would be implemented before death on site of the persons home or medical office. But the last is less important if you can just arrange a trip to the site before death (which works better for illness and deterriorating conditions than for accidents).

 

Then I'd like to see plans for revival review boards and condition repair sciences to be able to take place. So that a person with stage four liver cancer like my uncle, who hasn't responded well to therapy, if he decided to use the process could go in knowing that these are tissue preserving and mostly reversable processes and that he could be put under and every few years the review of medical proceedures for stage four liver cancer would be held, and once they are fairly certain of a greater than 78% chance of being able to kill the cancer and also to be able to stabalize his weakened health from chemo, and the preservation and reversal... then they revive him and do those.

 

I may still do it, if I ever get the money I'll need to manage it. But I've not much hope right now that it's anything but an elaborate burial ritual with similarity to mummification. only with a better preserved body that could benefit science even if it wouldn't bring me back.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#51
CLB

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Livingto100.com puts me up to 2082 (85 years old). But hopefully medical advances will boost life to thousands of years if not forever. Personally I'd like to live at least ten thousand years. I'd probably only ever want to stop living if the human race stagnates.

If something I say sounds like trolling/being stupid/offensive, please forgive me. I'm bad with people.


#52
razer1994

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Livingto100.com puts me up to 2082 (85 years old). But hopefully medical advances will boost life to thousands of years if not forever.Personally I'd like to live at least ten thousand years. I'd probably only ever want to stop living if the human race stagnates.

Well that's dramatic

#53
CLB

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Hmm... I thought it sounded a bit dramatic when I was writing it but I couldn't think of a better way to phrase it.

If something I say sounds like trolling/being stupid/offensive, please forgive me. I'm bad with people.


#54
midnightr

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That program someone linked put me at 85 years. I would of guessed between 80 & 90 years. That's assuming technology stays similar to how it is today. Of course it won't, and even if it isn't possible to live forever (because we can't transplant the brain without losing our identity) we will surely live to over 100 years easily & in good health. 



#55
FutureOfToday

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Hmm... I thought it sounded a bit dramatic when I was writing it but I couldn't think of a better way to phrase it.

Well, ten thousand years is literally nothing compared with forever!

#56
FutureOfToday

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Interesting how many people have voted that they think they'll live forever! I wonder how many of us will actually achieve this.

#57
Raklian

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Interesting how many people have voted that they think they'll live forever! I wonder how many of us will actually achieve this.

 

We have a better chance than we think.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#58
King of Ace

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sweet dreams then xP ,Elites will hold them for a very long time till us .


I am not a fan of S.T show "just don't like it" ,Its boring like hell but I love to see cool technology in coming years.

i don't live in really great english countries like some you guys, im alittle indian,chinese,enbgrish ,mexican, leaf village and soul society .


#59
José Andrade

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I think we will reach many different ways of living longer in our life span. So unless i am killed, i get a disease or i die from an accident or something i think i will live forever.


"In this world, a single blade can take you anywhere you want to go. It's a virtual world, but i still feel more alive here than i do in the real one." Kirito - Sword Art Online


#60
four

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Impossible to answer this question accurately. I think I have at least a 10% chance of living past 500, on the other hand I also have at least a 10% chance of dying before 75, even excluding accidents.

 

And that's assuming we still find the current concepts of life, time and individuality meaningful in the future.

 

the Livingto100 website gave me an estimate of 86.


Edited by four, 09 September 2013 - 12:41 AM.

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