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Transport & Infrastructure News and Discussions

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#661
Sciencerocks

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Automated high speed rail lines will start in China in 2019
brian wang | May 1, 2018
https://www.nextbigf...na-in-2019.html
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CRRC Changchun Railway Vehicles Co. has announced that an automated high-speed railway line linking Beijing and Zhangjiakou will be tested in 2019.

The 174-kilometer intercity railway is a high-speed rail line, with a designed speed of up to 350 km/h. Construction work on the line began in April 2016 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2019. There are 10 stations along the line.

Travel time between Beijing to Zhangjiakou in Hebei province will be shortened from the current three hours to within one hour. The automated high-speed train will use 7.5% less energy than the current slower train.

 


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#662
Sciencerocks

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Australian Fastbricks Robotics bricklaying bot maker wants to build 600,000 homes per year by 2023
brian wang | April 30, 2018
https://www.nextbigf...ar-by-2023.html
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Fastbrick Robotics Limited (ASX:FBR) is an Australian robotic technology company developing and commercializing digital construction technology solutions, including the revolutionary commercial bricklaying machine, Hadrian X.

The Hadrian X construction robot is on track to being completed by the end of the second quarter of 2018.

Fastbrick is now targeting 2 percent of the global market within the next five years, approximately 600,000 low-rise buildings a year.

 


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#663
caltrek

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Putting the Public First in Public-Private Partnerships

 

http://prospect.org/...te-partnerships

 

Introduction:

 

(American Prospect) In a perfect world, a big-city mayor would not have to wrangle over how to finance a tunnel to the port. But Manny Diaz did not live in a perfect world: He lived in Miami. Port traffic clogging downtown was a decades-old problem. To realize his vision of a vibrant region showcased by a vital city center, Mayor Diaz had to get…port-bound 18-wheelers off downtown streets.

 

In 2007, with a plan and money on the table, the Florida Department of Transportation turned up the heat on the term-limited mayor to deliver the tunnel. So Diaz devised a strategy to gin up city and surrounding county support: He tossed a baseball stadium, museums, more funds for a performing arts center—and the tunnel—into one civic wish-list basket and made a successful appeal to regional pride for funding them all. Meanwhile, two multinational firms, Meridiam, a public infrastructure investor, and Bouygues Travaux Publics, a tunneling and engineering firm, arrived on the scene with the dollars to move the …initiative forward after the Great Recession unspooled the original consortium. “It was perfect timing,” says Diaz.

 

More than a decade later, the Port of Miami Tunnel is the marquee example of a public-private transportation infrastructure partnership. The concessionaire’s financing sources totaled about $900 million. It gets back a revenue stream based on state and federal funding sources, so there are no tolls. The city now has several new amenities, as well as two tunnels with two lanes each that, shortly after opening, decreased the weekly average volume of all port-bound traffic in downtown Miami by 35 percent and reduced weekly commercial truck traffic by nearly 80 percent.

 

But the tunnel’s success is deceptive, since the unique factors that converged in South Florida cannot be replicated everywhere. For every Port of Miami Tunnel, scores of ill-conceived projects dot the American landscape. The United States lags behind not only in basic maintenance of existing assets at the end of their life cycles but in building the next generation of roads, bridges, rail, tunnels, and aviation projects. With public funds scarce in a climate of tax-cutting and budgetary austerity, the risk is that the contactor/partner pays the up-front costs but sticks future generations of taxpayers and rate-payers with exorbitant charges.

 

ap_120214171700.jpg?itok=CA1Oj4pl

Activists in Boston protest fare hikes resulting from the project's cost overruns. 

AP Photo Steven Senne


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#664
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Estonia first country with free public transportation
brian wang | May 19, 2018
https://www.nextbigf...sportation.html
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Trams, buses and trains for free for registered Estonia resident’s. Each city makes a profit of €1,000 from the citizen’s income tax every year. People need a €2 green card and carry their ID on public transport.

Free public transport also stimulates the mobility of all income groups. People go out more often for entertainment, to restaurants, bars and cinemas. They consume local goods and services and are likely to spend more money, more often. In the end this makes local businesses thrive.

Before introducing free public transport, the city center was crammed with cars. This situation has improved — also because they raised parking fees. People leave cars in a park-and-ride and check in to public transport on the same day, they use public transport for free, but are not charged parking fees. People didn’t complain about high parking fees once they were offered them a good alternative.

 


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#665
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Related to infrastructure:

 

5G Streetlights May Be Causing Mysterious Ailments

 

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2018/05/5g-streetlights-may-be-causing-mysterious-ailments/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mysterious Universe) Moths love them. Drivers love them. Doo-wop singers love them. We’re talking, of course, about streetlamps. Who doesn’t like them? Well, astronomers. All of that light is making it hard to see the stars. Urban planners don’t like them either … at least, not the old-style ones that can’t be connected to the Internet and controlled for efficiency and ambience. Fortunately, the new 5G LED street lamps currently being tested are designed to solve the second dilemma and may even help the first. What’s not to love about them? Well, how about the nosebleeds, insomnia, cancer, mental-health issues and possible birth defects? Are 5G streetlamps the next chemtrails?

 

Mark Steele lives in the northern England town of Gateshead, which is a test site for these LED street lamps. He also claims to be a member of IEEE (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) and is knowledgeable in what might be causing these strange maladies in Gateway. In his humble yet experienced opinion, the fine citizens of Gateway are being bombarded by 5G radiation emitted from the street lamps and the towers that control the wireless communications used to manipulate them. After noticing that his neighbors were reporting an unusual number of nosebleeds, cancer cases and worse, Steele believes it’s they that are being manipulated by the local government and businesses.

 

“We are seeing babies dying in the womb as these transmitters are situated outside people’s bedroom windows. It’s a humanitarian crisis.”


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#666
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Auto Pollution Grows In Europe As Tesla Shows The Way Forward

https://cleantechnic...he-way-forward/

May 27th, 2018 by Guest Contributor

Originally published on EVANNEX.
By Charles Morris

 

With European emissions standards getting steadily stricter, you’d think automakers would be steadily making their cars cleaner. Alas, you’d be mistaken — according to a recent report from JATO Dynamics (via Automotive News Europe), European emissions increased by a wee bit in 2017, reversing a decade of steady decreases in tailpipe pollution.

 



#667
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California Approves $738 Million Transportation Electrification Initiative.

 

California is at the forefront of US states when it comes to reducing carbon emissions. Nearly 40% of those emissions come from the state’s transportation sector. Not only has California always been ground zero for car culture, but it’s also home to several of the largest ports in America, whose operations depend on heavy-duty trucks powered by diesel engines that produce tremendous pollution.

 

https://cleantechnic...ion-initiative/



#668
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All of UK ‘should have high speed rail by 2050’ 

 

High-speed rail connecting all of the UK mainland by 2050 would put “rocket fuel in Britain’s economy”, a leading transport think tank has proposed.

 

The move would shrink a long-standing productivity gap with countries such as Germany, Italy and France, Greengauge 21 said. It would also reduce an over-reliance on London by lowering journey times and allowing other cities to flourish, it added.

 

A new connection in the West Midlands would see HS2 trains speed to cities such as Bristol, Cardiff, Newcastle and Edinburgh, reducing the need for environmentally harmful cars, the group suggested.

 

HS2 is a planned high-speed rail network, with trains holding more than 1,000 commuters travelling up to 250 mph, from London to Birmingham and to Manchester and Leeds. Services on the London-Birmingham phase of the £56 billion network are predicted to open from 2026.

 

Read more at: https://www.scotsman...-2050-1-4746216



#669
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All of UK ‘should have high speed rail by 2050’ 

 

High-speed rail connecting all of the UK mainland by 2050 would put “rocket fuel in Britain’s economy”, a leading transport think tank has proposed.

 

The move would shrink a long-standing productivity gap with countries such as Germany, Italy and France, Greengauge 21 said. It would also reduce an over-reliance on London by lowering journey times and allowing other cities to flourish, it added.

 

A new connection in the West Midlands would see HS2 trains speed to cities such as Bristol, Cardiff, Newcastle and Edinburgh, reducing the need for environmentally harmful cars, the group suggested.

 

HS2 is a planned high-speed rail network, with trains holding more than 1,000 commuters travelling up to 250 mph, from London to Birmingham and to Manchester and Leeds. Services on the London-Birmingham phase of the £56 billion network are predicted to open from 2026.

 

Read more at: https://www.scotsman...-2050-1-4746216

 

I'm hoping for Hyperloop by 2035


“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#670
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Pedal-powered trimaran lets cyclists hit the water
 

Among other things, Josep Rubau has designed cars for Volkswagen, and was the creator of the Tramontana supercar. Now, the Spanish industrial designer is CEO of RedShark Bikes, a company that sells a pedal-powered prop-driven trimaran which he invented.

 

There are actually three versions of the RedShark trimaran – the recreation-oriented Fun, the rough-and-ready Adventure and the high-performance Sport.

 

 

https://newatlas.com...trimaran/55101/



#671
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Experimental NASA noise-reduction tech could make for quieter airports

 

If you've ever lived near an airport, or visited someone who does, you'll be familiar with the window-shaking rumble that can keep many a household up at night. NASA has taken it upon itself to address the problem, testing three new noise reduction technologies on a series of Acoustic Research Measurement (ARM) flights, and managing to cut airframe noise during landing by more than 70 percent.

 

https://newatlas.com...eriments/55194/



#672
Sciencerocks

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Much of the US is falling apart! Population migration patterns: US cities Americans are abandoning
Also check out the 50 worst cities in the US, a lot of surprises. And then think of the many not even on the list. I wonder how many voted for tRump, falling for all of his endless lies so he could enrich himself and his cohorts.

https://www.usatoday...ation/35801453/


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#673
Jakob

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Akka pod with detachable wings would integrate aviation with public transit

 

Akka Technologies is developing pods with detachable wings that would integrate aviation and public transit. The AKKA Group is an engineering and technology consulting company with 16000 employees.

The detachable wings would make for vastly more efficient boarding and improve the utilization of the engines and wings.

 

NextBigFuture is the best future news site ever! I used to follow futurism.com just as obsessively, but have stopped due to their blatant socialist propaganda and now only check it when bored at work.



#674
funkervogt

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Why innovation thrives in cities

Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office
June 4, 2013

Double a city’s population and its economic productivity goes up 130 percent. MIT researchers think they know why.

Read more: http://web.mit.edu/n...ities-0604.html

I've known about this phenomenon for a while, but the study is illuminating because it mentions possible limitations. 

 

 

“When you pack people together, something special happens,” says Alex “Sandy” Pentland, the Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Science and director of the Human Dynamics Laboratory. “This is the sort of thing that Adam Smith wanted to explain. He explained it through specialization: People were able to narrow what they did to get better at it, and because they were nearby, they could trade with each other. 

This is a bedrock theory of modern economics, but it's critical to remember that the benefits of maximum specialization plus free trade plateau after a certain point. For example, if the U.S. specialized in only making computers, Mexico specialized in only making tequila, and there were no trade barriers at all between the two countries, computers wouldn't get so cheap in Mexico that they'd be free, and tequila wouldn't get so cheap in America that it would be free. In both cases, a price floor would be reached, and further improvement would be impossible. 

 

Similarly, I think it's likely that the productivity and innovation benefits that come from enlarging cities top out once the cities reach a certain size and/or density. 



#675
funkervogt

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Much of the US is falling apart! Population migration patterns: US cities Americans are abandoning
Also check out the 50 worst cities in the US, a lot of surprises. And then think of the many not even on the list. I wonder how many voted for tRump, falling for all of his endless lies so he could enrich himself and his cohorts.

https://www.usatoday...ation/35801453/

 

30. Charleston, West Virginia
 
Population decrease due to migration, 2010-2017: -9,772
Population change, 2010-2017: -5.6% (227,061 to 214,406)
Natural growth, 2010-2017: 18,078 births, 20,856 deaths
Median home value: $111,300
 
I spent a few days in Charleston in 2012, and word of its decline comes as no surprise. The city is overwhelmingly old, white, overweight, and has the feeling of being stuck in time. In the entire city, there's one or two blocks of "cool" and "trendy" shops and restaurants. That's it. 


#676
Jakob

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Proposal to Reclaim Giant Artificial Island beside Hong Kong Airport to hold 1.1 million people

 

There is a proposal to reclaim an artificial island measuring almost half the size of Kowloon to house up to 1.1 million people. One-third of the land would be allocated for housing, 70% of the residential areas would be dedicated to building affordable homes. The rest of the area would be for commercial uses, public facilities and new industries.

The foundation believed the island could be the city’s third commercial hub after Central and Kowloon East as it would be well connected with roads and railways to both Hong Kong Island and Tuen Mun. Neighbouring mainland cities such as Nansha and Zhongshan in Guangdong province would be within an hour’s reach.

 


#677
rennerpetey

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How to Bullshit With Statistics

 

As you probably know, President Obama put in place higher mileage standards for new cars before he left office. President Trump, naturally, wants to get rid of them. This requires a report demonstrating that the Obama standards would be bad, so he ordered OMB Director Mick Mulvaney to produce one.¹ Mick saluted and scurried off to carry out his boss’s order with the help of the Department of Transportation, which is conveniently run by Elaine Chao, the wife of Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell.

 
Today the EPA made public an … um … assessment of the report that it wrote a couple of months ago. The EPA’s assessment “privately challenged the Trump administration’s rationale for freezing Obama-era mileage standards,” according to the Associated Press, and that made me curious to see it. Eventually I did, and now I’m going to share a small part of it with you. Fair warning, though: even for chart nerds, this is pretty tedious. But I promise that it’s worth it, for reasons that I hope will become clear.

(yes, there's an obvious bias, but it did alert me to something I didn't know before and set up a good argument)


John Lennon dares you to make sense of this

Spoiler

#678
caltrek

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Price Tag to Repair Tallest US Dam Spikes to $1.1 Billion

 

https://www.courthou...to-1-1-billion/

 

Introduction:

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (Courthouse News) – Fortification costs for the nation’s tallest but flawed dam have spiked to over $1 billion, California officials said Wednesday – a figure more than five times original estimates.

 

The state and its contractors have been scrambling to repair Oroville Dam’s busted flood-control systems following a near-catastrophic spillway failure that forced nearly 200,000 Northern California residents to flee in February 2017.

 

In a monthly repair update, the California Department of Water Resources pegged the price tag for the reconstruction of the dam’s main and emergency spillway at $1.1 billion, up from an initial estimate of $200 million. Crews are also on track to meet a Nov. 1 “public safety” milestone and have the main spillway safely operational before the rainy season.

 

Department spokeswoman Erin Mellon said the total cost could still fluctuate as crews continue to remove massive amounts of debris below the two damaged spillways.

 

“As with any project of considerable magnitude, cost estimates are affected by conditions onsite and direction from regulatory bodies throughout design and construction,” the department said in a statement.

Oroville-Spillway-Damage.jpg?resize=960%

View of Oroville Dam’s main spillway (center) and emergency spillway (top), February 11, 2017. The large gully to the right of the main spillway was caused by water flowing through its damaged concrete surface.

(Photo: William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources – California Department of Water Resources)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: transport, infrastructure, transportation, high-speed rail, aerotravel, buildings, sewage systems, urban infrastructure, rural infrastructure, road networks

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