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Where will we go after Earth?


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19 replies to this topic

#1
Chronicle

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"The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever."

~Konstantin Tsiolkovsky

 

Someday, humans will have to leave Earth. But where would we go? Besides Mars, Europa, etc..

 

I think a good choice would be Gliese 581-b. By the time we need to evacuate Earth, we would have the tech to get there.(hopefully)

 

Any thoughts?

 

 


Yes.


#2
WithoutCoincidence

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I don't think we'll ever really need to evacuate Earth; by the time we have the tech to go to exoplanets, we'll either have the situation back home under control or be extinct. At most, the only reason I can see we'd abandon Earth is to make it a sort of national (Species-al?) park.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#3
Keitaro2011

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I don't think we'll ever really need to evacuate Earth; by the time we have the tech to go to exoplanets, we'll either have the situation back home under control or be extinct. At most, the only reason I can see we'd abandon Earth is to make it a sort of national (Species-al?) park.

Inter-imperial.


It's apparent to me that a lot of people seem to want to prove why a technology is not possible, rather than think of ingenious ways to make something possible. It's my conviction that when someone says something is "impossible," what they really mean is "our current level of science cannot explain this, and I don’t have the motivation to explore beyond its boundaries." -Richard Obousy

#4
Alric

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Well if we want to live on earth forever we will need to find a way to reboot our sun without it killing everyone, and help steer the milky way out of a collision with the next nearest galaxy. Those things will happen eventually, so we would need to solve it. Or perhaps we deconstruct the entire earth and move it along with us.

 

Maybe in a million years we will be wearing necklaces with like a piece dirt from earth as a keepsake of where we came from.



#5
bee14ish

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Well, once we leave Earth, it is my understanding that we'll land on some planet called Nova Prime and make that our home. After about a thousand years, we'll throw down with some pissed off aliens called S'krell who intend to make NP their home. I don't know why, seeing as there are billions of other planets out there that they can go to instead. These S'krell will hunt us down with some animals called Ursas, and their only way of sensing is by smelling our fear. Some asshole named Cypher learns how to hide his fear from these guys, rendering them completely blind. This leads us to victory and humanity lives happily ever after.

 

Long story short- Humanity is doomed.


Edited by bee14ish, 08 June 2013 - 09:07 AM.


#6
Chronicle

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What if Earth, Mars and Venus become too small? Humanity could get overpopulated.


Yes.


#7
Ewan

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Depends if FTL is developed. If it is, we'll go elsewhere, if it isn't we'll likely terraform every planet & moon in the solar system first. 



#8
Brohanne Jahms

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What if Earth, Mars and Venus become too small? Humanity could get overpopulated.

 

In the amount of time it would take for that to happen technology would likely be so developed that finding new places to live probably wouldn't be a problem anymore. At least I'd assume so. You could always go up or down. You don't only have to stay on the surface of the planet you're on. Massive underground networks, towering superstructures connected to one another. Even creating livable environments in and on the ocean.

 

The real problem with overpopulation so extreme that there is literally no more living space would be that other resources would have ran out a very long time ago. Obviously things would still have to be brought in from off world to deal with the demand. That'd lead to a large amount of people spending time in space leading to further, if not temporary, living space to be inhabited while they're gone.



#9
Lucid

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I believe by the time we have the capabilities to travel to other planets without much cost, we will also have to ability to transfer brain memory into computers. This will make traveling to other planets a lot easier (and that's only if we don't have FTL travel). Reason is because when we start our adventure to another planet light years away, we could either spend our spare time in a virtual reality, or turn our selves off for the duration of the travel and turn ourselves back on once we reached the planet. Years could have passed and it would seem like it was instant. For the first planets to actually be visited, I would 100% say mars first. I know there are some moons on our solar system that seem habitable. We could potentially probe around more with the planets in our solar system as well that we cant actually build on, and maybe one day harvest them for whatever they contain. For outside our solar system I'm not sure. There's way too many possibility's in space and so many directions to explore. Our solar system is really just the baby steps of our space expedition. 

 

For me, I wouldn't want to travel to another planet. Not because I don't want to, but because if the option of virtual reality is out, why would I spend any time in the real world? In the virtual world I can simulate me finding life on another planet, trying to find life on another planet in real life seems redundant. Also, along with traveling to other planets, once I do actually transfer my brain data to a computer, I do actually plan on going into space. However, I will be set in a path in space to rotate around the earth once every 20 years (roughly, who knows how fast computers can advance by that time). I can't say for sure now, but the idea remains that I will spend my time in a computer capsule that is secluded from most dangers in the real world. Once I can live independently, and when my computer is so advanced it can advance itself without help from earth, I will split off from earth and find the nearest exit out of our galaxy. 



#10
Time_Traveller

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I think Alpha Centuri will be one of the next places we'll go after we achieve space travel to other solar systems.Sent from my GT-S5830 using Tapatalk 2

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#11
wjfox

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I think Alpha Centuri will be one of the next places we'll go after we achieve space travel to other solar systems. Sent from my GT-S5830 using Tapatalk 2

 

Alpha Centauri is known to contain at least one Earth-sized planet, but it's probably too hot for life.

 

http://www.futuretim...012/10/17-2.htm

 

 

 

Posted Image



#12
Yuli Ban

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I'd recommend we colonize planets as infrequently as possible, using them mainly for materials. Otherwise, drift through space. From wanderers we began  to wanderers we end...


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#13
Guyverman1990

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We always hear about the Giliese and Keppler missions discovering new potential Earthlike planets, but why not The Alpha Centauri?



#14
FutureOfToday

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This might sound stupid today, but perhaps in many many thousands of years, we'll be able to literally make Earth bigger to allow more room?

#15
Ru1138

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I'd recommend we colonize planets as infrequently as possible, using them mainly for materials. Otherwise, drift through space. From wanderers we began  to wanderers we end...

 

Reminds me of a science fiction book I read. I had better make a topic about it sometime...


What difference does it make?


#16
WithoutCoincidence

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but why not The Alpha Centauri?

Because the exoplanet there, Alpha Centauri Bb, orbits at 0.04 AU from its star. Compared to that, Mercury orbits Sol at 0.4 AU. Pushing it into an acceptable orbit sounds like a lot of work...


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#17
Guyverman1990

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but why not The Alpha Centauri?

Because the exoplanet there, Alpha Centauri Bb, orbits at 0.04 AU from its star. Compared to that, Mercury orbits Sol at 0.4 AU. Pushing it into an acceptable orbit sounds like a lot of work...

 

But what about other potential planets in the system?



#18
WithoutCoincidence

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There may or may not be other planets there. We'll have to see.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#19
Raffen

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I'd recommend we colonize planets as infrequently as possible, using them mainly for materials. Otherwise, drift through space. From wanderers we began  to wanderers we end...

 

Reminds me of a science fiction book I read. I had better make a topic about it sometime...

 

Ship of Fools by R. P. Russo?



#20
Ru1138

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Ship of Fools by R. P. Russo?

 

Nope. Macrolife by George Zebrowski.


What difference does it make?





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