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What Does "Futuristic" Look Like?


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#21
WithoutCoincidence

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If there is greed and corruption then that means biological evolution has done its job.


The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

-Chris Impey, How It Ends


#22
rtardx

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#23
RayMC

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Yeah I have seen that episode. Good times :)


“Wʜᴀᴛ ɪs ɴᴏᴡ ᴘʀᴏᴠᴇᴅ, ᴡᴀs ᴏɴᴄᴇ ᴏɴʟʏ ɪᴍᴀɢɪɴᴇᴅ.” - Wɪʟʟɪᴀᴍ Bʟᴀᴋᴇ


#24
Colonel O'Neil

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I don't think that we will see the future as "futuristic" because it changes with time. If we were locked up for 20 years, then the future may seem futuristic lol, but surely not if we experience the change over time.

 

Does today seem futuristic? Probably not, but it assuredly is compared to even 10 years ago


The art of forgetting is inherent in human minds; the art of being forgotten  is the normal fate of knowing. We as futurists don't accept that. In the panels of the Universe, we alone will remain standing; remain unforgotten.


#25
FutureOfToday

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I can't really tell much difference between 2003 and today except PC technology. Not a lot has really changed in the past ten years in comparison to decades in the 20th century. Technological development seemed to speed up hugely in the 20th century, but it seems to be a little more paced out now.

#26
Squillimy

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I can't really tell much difference between 2003 and today except PC technology. Not a lot has really changed in the past ten years in comparison to decades in the 20th century. Technological development seemed to speed up hugely in the 20th century, but it seems to be a little more paced out now.

 

Well what i think is that technology is still on the exponential rise, but we're just more used to the change. Also alot of the change is just improvements on already existing technology. Like standard definition TV --> HDTV --> 3D HDTV --> ULTRA HDTV (just released) --> 3D ULTRA HDTV (yet to be released).

 

Or cellphones / computers. Okay they're faster. They have more space. They're cameras are better. That's about it though... What about cars? They look different but it all comes down to MPG, horsepower, efficiency.

 

The reason change seems less is because no completely new ground breaking technologies have become immediately available to the consumer. Like 3D Printed organs or 3D printers. We all know that's big, but you do not encounter this on an every day basis. 

 

That will change soon though. The 2020's will be big. Driverless cars will be available by 2020. Moore's law will begin to come to an end or into a great transition in the early 2020's. Ubiquitous computing is going to start appearing early 2020's. 3D printing will be a multi-billion dollar business in the 2020's. Wireless electricity, Augmented reality, AI on the rise, Nanotech, Virtual Reality, Lifelike videogames, Deafness and blindness being cured, Human brain simulations, Veritical farms. Robotic/regrown limbs, printed electronics!!!

 

Yea... The 2020's are when people are going to start realize shit is getting crazy in my opinion. It'll come with ALOT of new technologies for consumers


Edited by Squillimy, 08 August 2013 - 01:00 AM.

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What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#27
Squillimy

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As for the topic. In my opinion, Everyday Futuristic (for the near future) is just: computers everywhere, more automated services, and augmented reality being a norm. People depict the future with buildings that are all white and sleek, but this doesn't make sense. People will not tear down buildings simply to rebuild a sleeker futuristic one. They simply modify their own buildings with new features.

 

This is obvious, because you see it today. Goto any city and the average birthdate for a building probably ranges 1940 - 1960. In big cities they're often much older than that. Even in the newer suburbs average homes are typically atleast 20 years old. The future will look somewhat similar to today, but strange at the same time. People will put electronics and ubiquitous computing in the walls of their old buildings. That will be a site to see.

 

Ofcourse, building buildings will become cheaper. And eventually fully automated.


Edited by Squillimy, 08 August 2013 - 12:58 AM.

What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#28
johnny20

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It's something like the Avatar movie.



#29
Brohanne Jahms

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Sleek and chromed.



#30
IzzyIngleby

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I feel like technology is getting faster and faster still, although I do get the sense that most peoples desires for ever more computing power has begun to taper off, there's only so much processing power needed to write word documents and send them half-way across the world.

 

I would expect the trend to continue towards smaller and smaller computing devices, until it's decided that the technology is adequately small. We saw that with mobile phone technology, phones got continuously smaller through to the early 2000's and then froze, because people don't want a phone the size of a fingernail. People switched from creating ever smaller phones to creating smart phones-and then they began getting bigger again...



#31
ralfy

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Consider diminishing returns coupled with a resource shortage and environmental damage.



#32
Yuli Ban

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I agree with that.. I just don't think all of the world will be a utopia, maybe it will be.. but then look at the world today, some of the world is heavily developed.. while yet a lot of people in the world are still in poverty. Plus, the resources to give "utopia" to all 7+ billion people would be staggering . Plus, there is so much greed and corruption in the world. 

And don't forget, there's a whole range of people who will chew you up if you even dare to suggest that something's wrong with this kind of world.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#33
Yuli Ban

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So here's my prediction for the near future. Rather unrealistic, but I hope it inspires someone.

 

By about 2020....

 

-In the realm of consumer electronics, we have seen the sudden growth of electronic paper, which has sent newspaper publications scrambling. Luckily, it hasn't become very ubiquitous as of yet, but it has caught the eyes of a new generation, "Technostics" I've labeled them, technophiles who are tech-conscious and open to the experience. They spout this bizarre, alien kind of philosophy which states that robots will replace human workers and capitalism and socialism alike will falter. Likewise, there's a reaction to this generation, largely from the Right but definitely many from the luddite left, who look down on this recent love-affair with technology.

The technostics have also taken to the 2nd generation of mass market VR post Rift. Likewise, with other developments for other senses (i.e. Emotiv's Insight) such concepts as texting by thinking and even giving a new voice to your thoughts are possible and we've begun to see stories and pictures written/drawn entirely by neural control tech.

At which point, social networking via VR is now becoming a reality and the world's first neutrally-written book will have been published. This has further divided generations, with those who feel as if technology is now usurping the human experience seriously beginning to debate transhumanism and its [negative] implications. Around 2018, I expect the term "transhuman" to enter popular consciousness, but not as a positive term. Almost certainly, there will be defenders of transhumanism who will decide that, to avoid the negative connotations, they may need to rely on new terms (directed evolution? H-E-Double L no, how about... Human enhancement?)

We've seen a computer that has passed the Turing Test, in fact exceeding the Turing Test's predictions, but computer scientists and neurologists still say that we don't have artificial intelligence. But there is now a sea-change in opinion, and the concept that AI is possible has become one of two camps- those who think it's inevitable and we're there (the growing camp), and those who think that we're never going to achieve artificial sentience but perhaps something akin to it if that (the shrinking camp).

Coupled with this news is that a machine is overcoming another barrier (I've asspulled and called it the Asimov Barrier), which is the point where an artificial, non-biological hand matches the dexterity of a human hand at least to 85% proficiency. At this point, it will become possible for machines to enter the common workforce, even social work, without suffering from the "Cold, unfeeling" valley that they currently own (After all, you know how a robot's hand works- like stiff pencils in motion). Still, it's not perfected and is rather expensive at the moment. But proving that these barriers have been passed sends shockwaves throughout society, especially to capitalists and economists- this means that the concept of a machine working class is not as far-fetched as once believed and it is indeed possible to destroy the consumer-producer cycle.

Perhaps a backlash from conservatives will mount once this becomes part of the popular consciousness as well- the idea that robots will work for us is no longer relegated to fanciful G-rated science fiction.

 

But just like with all other modes of fantasy (i.e. talking animals, magic, aliens), once you put them in the REAL WORLD, they have to obey real world laws. If we had talking animals in the real world, you think everyone would accept them and we'd get over it? Hell no. What do talking animals have to do with robot proletarians?

We see robots as nothing more than sci-fi trite when they've clearly gone past this. Now that you've introduced these "sci-fi trites" into the real world, they have to follow the rules of the real world. That means dealing with paranoid humans and their psychotic ideas. Cutting all the bullshitting: Now that robots really can work for us, what are the implications?

This remains to be seen, but everyone- from capitalists to communists to fascists to primitivists- are perturbed.

 

What's a pop culture event that could become popular? I really don't know. Yet I'm on top of pop culture. Every day, I'm poring over pop culture articles, watching pop culture news, feeling so tween, so emo, so indie... And I can't predict any of it. It will easily become even more sexualized unless there's a reaction. Unless, unless, unless- it's the only word that matters.

Trenders could be listening to psyberdelic trance-rap/electro-blues/electronic country/binaural beats as pop music while wearing Tron-esque coats and jackets with extreme hair cuts in 5 years UNLESS we decide to do something else. The only thing that I do feel is likely is that technostic movement. Of course, it would have to come about with effort- as a wise musician said, we're waiting on the world to change (and that's not how you change the world)!

Technostics might also be the one to popularize the term "transhumanism"

 

What about AR? Easily much more ubiquitous. AR glasses will definitely enter the market, but I don't think we'll be using them anywhere near as much as some would like to believe. When it's necessary to find a location, yes. When you see a friend or someone's notifying you of a call, yes. At every moment you walk, not even possible.

But tech-glasses might have more possibilities. Perhaps we could get some Daylight Glasses, which allow people wearing the glasses to see in the dark as if it's daytime.

 

We will see more automation, done with that subject.

Robots will get more advanced, and the for the first time, taken seriously in pop culture.

I think larger computers will make a comeback, but we'll be seeing some VR integration.

 

Also, by 2025, the first hologram movie will have debuted at some point in the past 5 years. Imagine that- a hologram movie.

 

3D printing also reaches the mainstream and already people w/o any prior thought of molecular fabrication begins to think 'what if we could "print" more practical objects, like food or even gold?...'

Smart-houses will begin to enter the mainstream market. Imagine a smart board, but 1000x more advanced and spread out through your house. (Google SmartBoards if you're ignorant to what they are, they seem to have been a recent development)

Finally and perhaps most importantly, the current generation of youth, now entering either middle age or that awkward full-stage adulthood 25-30 age, will begin growing their own new generation who will view all this tech as outdated and archaic by the time they're our age. The world this generation is raised in will seem alien, baffling, cyberpunk to us but perfectly normal, even drab to them. Like the future just can't come fast enough to them. The real developments are just around the corner... just 5 years from now...

 

 

I'll add more to this later.


Edited by The Young Homo Maximus, 01 October 2013 - 08:08 PM.

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#34
Yuli Ban

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I can't really tell much difference between 2003 and today except PC technology. Not a lot has really changed in the past ten years in comparison to decades in the 20th century. Technological development seemed to speed up hugely in the 20th century, but it seems to be a little more paced out now.

 

Well what i think is that technology is still on the exponential rise, but we're just more used to the change. Also alot of the change is just improvements on already existing technology. Like standard definition TV --> HDTV --> 3D HDTV --> ULTRA HDTV (just released) --> 3D ULTRA HDTV (yet to be released).

 

Or cellphones / computers. Okay they're faster. They have more space. They're cameras are better. That's about it though... What about cars? They look different but it all comes down to MPG, horsepower, efficiency.

 

The reason change seems less is because no completely new ground breaking technologies have become immediately available to the consumer. Like 3D Printed organs or 3D printers. We all know that's big, but you do not encounter this on an every day basis. 

 

That will change soon though. The 2020's will be big. Driverless cars will be available by 2020. Moore's law will begin to come to an end or into a great transition in the early 2020's. Ubiquitous computing is going to start appearing early 2020's. 3D printing will be a multi-billion dollar business in the 2020's. Wireless electricity, Augmented reality, AI on the rise, Nanotech, Virtual Reality, Lifelike videogames, Deafness and blindness being cured, Human brain simulations, Veritical farms. Robotic/regrown limbs, printed electronics!!!

 

Yea... The 2020's are when people are going to start realize shit is getting crazy in my opinion. It'll come with ALOT of new technologies for consumers

 

Yeah, this.

I see the 2010s as a sort of "Intermediate phase." The 2000s brought us the tech we're used to now, and the 2020s will be the next generation of them all with new players appearing because we apply what we've learned from the 2000s and 2010s. The 2030s will probably be a lull period i.e. more news about social strife and pop culture than tech, with the '40s surging ahead thanks to developers and engineers building off what they've learned from the past decade. 


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#35
Halcyon

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Transparency, multi-functionality, durability. Clean curvilinear designs, high contrast, and subtle illuminations.



#36
IzzyIngleby

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Don't forget the lens flare.



#37
eldigato

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^Do you believe that the future will really be as dystopian as that?

Jeb Bush is running for president so it wouldn't surprise me



#38
Yuli Ban

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To be honest, it doesn't matter if the libertards or conservatards win. It's gonna be one hell of a dystopia, baby.


Edited by The Young Homo Maximus, 17 September 2013 - 05:49 PM.

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#39
eldigato

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To be honest, it doesn't matter if the libertards or conservatards win. It's gonna be one hell of a dystopia, baby.

I prefer "Republicunt" but yeah we're fucked anyways



#40
Yuli Ban

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Actually, I'm kinda queefed by the usage of "libertard." You can only tell its usage in context. If the user says "Capitalism," "bad" and "libertard" about in that order, you can say that "libertard"= Libertarians. Especially iLibertarians.

But if it's "Bad," "libertard", "Capitalism", you're probably listening to someone referring "Libertard" as "Liberal."

So Libertard is +/- Conservative Libertarian/Liberal, the latter of which- despite what conservatives will purport, kicking and screaming- can also come in a Libertarian flavor.

So what is that, a Libertarded Libertard?  Does that make any sense?!

 

Republicunt, how is that ambiguous in any way, shape, or form? 


Edited by The Young Homo Maximus, 17 September 2013 - 09:01 PM.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.





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