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When will we have settlements on mars?


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59 replies to this topic

#41
10gamerguy

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Earthlings, eh? :p

 

That's just downright demeaning, lol! Anything that ends with -lings just gives me an image of feeble weakness and something begging to be invaded and molested.

 

How about something more respectable... like Terrans? :)

 

Martians and Terrans... like the sound of that.

Earthicans?


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#42
Ru1138

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Earthicans?
Maybe Tellurians?

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#43
zEVerzan

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We'll only be called Earthicans if America is the Winner that Writes History again, but I highly doubt that will be the case.

 

Posted Image

 

Pictured: Ol' Freebie.


Edited by EVanimations, 16 August 2013 - 09:51 PM.

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#44
Sciencerocks

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I'd watch China, Russia or EU to do it.

 

;)

 

America right now is very divided and likely to fall soon.



#45
Ru1138

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I think manned missions will be sometime around the 2030s, with mass colonization happening maybe a decade later.


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#46
conferencemuthu

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Water? How would they get the air they need to breathe? How would they be self-sufficient?

 

There's plenty of water ice on Mars.

 

https://en.wikipedia...i/Water_on_Mars

 

 

More than five million square kilometers of ice has been identified on the surface of modern Mars, which is enough to cover the whole planet to a depth of 35 meters.

 

 

As for breathable air, take the CO2 in the ambient Martian atmosphere, put it through a bosch or sabatier reactor (both produce water), take the water that was produced and split it into hydrogen and oxygen. Voila! Breathable air!

 

easy to say in words, whereas, difficult or impossible to get it into process at large scale



#47
Ru1138

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easy to say in words, whereas, difficult or impossible to get it into process at large scale

 

The bosch/sabatier reactor? It's actually well tested. And the atmosphere is over 90% CO2 if I'm not mistaken. All you need to bring with is hydrogen. As for water ice, there's plenty of it near the surface in some areas. I don't see what is impossible to do here.

 

I think this is interesting by the way.

 

http://nextbigfuture...of-getting.html

 

 

He actually planned to send 80,000 people to Mars every year once the colonization begins. He says he knows it sounds crazy to some and he also says that he does not expect Spacex to do it alone.

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#48
Cody930

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The bosch/sabatier reactor? It's actually well tested. And the atmosphere is over 90% CO2 if I'm not mistaken. All you need to bring with is hydrogen. As for water ice, there's plenty of it near the surface in some areas. I don't see what is impossible to do here.

 

Mars has a little over 95% CO2 in it's atmosphere so yes, plenty to go around. :p We could also get additional hydrogen from extracted water ice. Wiki mentions another option with the Sabatier process, producing excess methane can be used to extract more carbon and hydrogen which then can be recycled back into the reactor. 


"Since we first emerged, a few million years ago in East Africa, we have meandered our way around the planet. There are now people on every continent and the remotest islands, from pole to pole, from Mount Everest to the Dead Sea, on the ocean bottoms and even, occasionally, in residence 200 miles up - humans, like the gods of old, living in the sky."


#49
Ru1138

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Wiki mentions another option with the Sabatier process, producing excess methane can be used to extract more carbon and hydrogen which then can be recycled back into the reactor. 

 

I think the problem with that is that it takes a lot of energy to break carbon hydrogen bonds. Though if fusion happens as soon as Next Big Future says it will, it might not be a problem.

 

And I found this after a search. So it could be feasible in the relatively near future.


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#50
Ru1138

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Found these as well. So reducing methane to 2H2 and C is a known process.

 

I think I'll look into classes that could help with the colonization of Mars.


Edited by Ru1138, 18 August 2013 - 07:37 PM.

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#51
Ru1138

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An interesting looking prospect for me is biology and systems engineering. Better start studying. :cool:


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#52
Colonel O'Neil

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Doing that large scale is beyond daunting with current levels of technology. If we could we would use it on Earth, to reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere,

 

I just don't think its feasible, anytime soon.


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#53
Ru1138

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If we could we would use it on Earth, to reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere,

 

Uh, we're talking about far smaller scales than that. Saying that is basically comparing apples to oranges.

 

As for not being feasible anytime soon, the problems have been identified and are being worked on.

 

http://www.wired.com...etting-to-mars/


Edited by Ru1138, 19 August 2013 - 03:03 AM.

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#54
Colonel O'Neil

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look Ru, I like you but I think you're totally deluded. We're not going to Mars anytime soon


The art of forgetting is inherent in human minds; the art of being forgotten  is the normal fate of knowing. We as futurists don't accept that. In the panels of the Universe, we alone will remain standing; remain unforgotten.


#55
Ru1138

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look Ru, I like you but I think you're totally deluded. We're not going to Mars anytime soon

 

I prefer to think of myself as an optimist.

 

Once I get enough money I might start looking into research on Martian ISRU technologies. After all, you can't haul all of the supplies for building a colony from Earth.


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#56
Ru1138

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Check out this piece of news.

 

http://en.ria.ru/sci...ns-to-Mars.html


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#57
Ru1138

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I think manned missions will be sometime around the 2030s, with mass colonization happening maybe a decade later.

 

Back in 2011 there was a video interview that Elon Musk did that pegged a manned Mars mission 10 to 20 years out. The interview (video autoplay warning) can be found http://live.wsj.com/...0DEFAD15BA]here[/url].

 

I'll admit it's not wise to bet the farm on things happening like that. But assuming he's successful I think my estimation might be close.


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#58
FutureOfToday

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A question that I have been thinking about for a while is: What will settlements on Mars be like? Will they be solely for research and scientific purposes, or will they be like actual towns and cities, where people live "normal" lives, get married, bring up children, work and play?

#59
Ru1138

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Will they be solely for research and scientific purposes, or will they be like actual towns and cities, where people live "normal" lives, get married, bring up children, work and play?

 

Initially they'll probably be for research purposes. Towns would come later.


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#60
Ru1138

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There's a space colonization subreddit if anyone is interested.


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