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Phobos


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#1
10gamerguy

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If (when) humans colonize Mars, they would want to stay there for a while, right? But then there's the problem of Phobos, the Mars' closest moon. For those who don't know, Phobos will break up and smash into Mars in 30-50 million years when it reaches the Roche Limit. That's a lot, but humans might still be there. Does anyone else think humans will try to push Phobos away to make sure it doesn't kill them?


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#2
Ru1138

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Perhaps. There's also the possibility that we eventually use it up (that dark soot would be good for lowering the albedo of the Martian ice caps...).


What difference does it make?


#3
Malgidus

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Assume we venture to Mars in the next couple of decades (and likely found a permanent colony at the same time). If I've done my arithmetic correctly, we still have approximately 29 MY to solve this issue. However, it's better to be safe than to be sorry. We could likely mine it for materials and control how it breaks apart over time. EDIT: My apologies. I didn't actually answer the question you posed: No, I do not think humans will push Phobos away. Doing so would require a very large force to accelerate it to Mars' escape velocity. I also do not believe humans (at least in this form) will be around in millions of years.

Edited by Malgidus, 23 August 2013 - 02:11 AM.

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#4
FutureOfToday

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30-50 million years is a hell of a long time, so we wouldn't need to worry about it.

#5
Brohanne Jahms

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50 million years ago you'd see the earliest primates known to man today. That's a very, very long time.



#6
10gamerguy

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I know 50 million years is really far off, but I was just curious.


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#7
Raklian

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By 50 million years, we will have already long ago shed our humanity and become something we can't even begin to imagine.


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#8
zEVerzan

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50 million years in the future, there's no doubt that Mars will be terraformed, and Mars's moons will have long since been mined away for resources.


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