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When will 100% perfect health be possible?


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Poll: 100% Perfect Health (33 member(s) have cast votes)

When will 100% perfect health be possible?

  1. Voted Before 2500 (23 votes [69.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 69.70%

  2. 2500 - 2600 (4 votes [12.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.12%

  3. 2600 - 2700 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. 2700 - 2800 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. 2800 - 2900 (1 votes [3.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.03%

  6. 2900 - 3000 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  7. 3000 - 3500 (3 votes [9.09%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.09%

  8. 3500 - 4000 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. 4000 - 5000 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  10. After 5000 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  11. Never (2 votes [6.06%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.06%

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#61
Italian Ufo

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We already have the Human Genome Project, and sequencing costs have improved faster than Moore's Law. Soon everyone will have a copy of their own genome, made possible by companies like 23andMe. This will allow targetted individual therapies to start becoming a reality. In fact they're already emerging as an option, with the first gene therapy in the Western world - Glybera - commercialised this year.

 

Why would we wait until 2130 before starting to use these? We don't need to "fully" understand the body to "start" implementing gene therapy. We can have a partial knowledge and still achieve great things.

 

Not everything is due to genetics. I am not a biological determinist. The fact that you have certain genes doesn't mean that you are resistant or you will get to this disease. Environment, life-style- conceptualization of a disease ( how we experience and illness) makes the big part.

Even if we develop some gene therapies we may cure some diseases but not many others who are related to the environment and personal experience.

by the way is 23and me reliable ?



#62
Brohanne Jahms

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You'll see casualty numbers jump way up if there's another war where two large conventional armies clash again. Seems less likely as time goes on though.

 

(Post is in reference to the post of our lovely administrator at the end of page 2)


Edited by Brohanne Jahms, 06 September 2013 - 06:16 PM.


#63
Lily

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Why would we wait until 2130 before starting to use these? We don't need to "fully" understand the body to "start" implementing gene therapy. We can have a partial knowledge and still achieve great things.

 

 

 

 

Wouldn't it be extremely risky to implement gene therapy while not fully understanding our body and how everything works? I think kjaggard already wrote about this at some point, if you turn on one gene, or another off, this has an effect on so many regulating mechanisms and on so many levels, we still don't even clome to understand even half of it. What if we cured, let's say, cancer, but caused some other, terrible damage in a person?

 

It's hard to imagine ever reaching 100%. I'd be more than happy to achieve functional "perfect" health, though. As long as you have zero discomfort or symptoms, I'd gladly accept imperfection on a miniature scale - and, we could keep working on it, but first, I guess, we have to eliminate all the major diseases and imperfections of the human body.


Edited by Lily, 09 September 2013 - 11:40 AM.

"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#64
Pwaa

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Never, because we will always crave unhealthy things, thats the way we are.

Mind you i guess that could always be stopped, but thats getting to the point where you'd start questioning if we're living or being forced to survive.



#65
Casey

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Wouldn't it be extremely risky to implement gene therapy while not fully understanding our body and how everything works? I think kjaggard already wrote about this at some point, if you turn on one gene, or another off, this has an effect on so many regulating mechanisms and on so many levels, we still don't even clome to understand even half of it. What if we cured, let's say, cancer, but caused some other, terrible damage in a person?   It's hard to imagine ever reaching 100%. I'd be more than happy to achieve functional "perfect" health, though. As long as you have zero discomfort or symptoms, I'd gladly accept imperfection on a miniature scale - and, we could keep working on it, but first, I guess, we have to eliminate all the major diseases and imperfections of the human body.

Yeah, I remember when jaggard said that. It's a very valid point in that it's certainly a real problem that needs to be considered, worked through, and eventually overcome, but my enthusiasm for gene therapy hasn't been dampened by the simple acknowledgement that it's a more complex thing than many give it credit for. Yes, the interaction of the human body's genes might be an overwhelmingly complex matter, but hey, the human race has worked out countless problems over the millennia that were considered to be overwhelmingly complex at first. (I would also think that future supercomputers would be able to simulate every possible combination of gene interactions. To my understanding there's about 20,000 genes, which doesn't sound like a terribly large amount for future exaflop and zettaflop supercomputers, but who knows. Science isn't my forte.) Personally, I don't think any we understand the human body well enough yet that anyone can discredit gene therapy. Rather than form any strong opinions with the limited information at our disposal, I'll just watch, wait, and hope for the best.


Edited by Casey, 10 September 2013 - 12:59 AM.


#66
Italian Ufo

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The best way to get almost perfect 100% is to defeat aging. Aging causes most of the diseases. We should all invest on that...then cancer, heart stroke, diabetes, sport injuries and much more can be fixed...at least the vast majority of it...

You will have some problems left even if you have defeat aging but these won't be so severe...at least some of them....and we can work on them later once the big is done



#67
Squillimy

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Regardless of whether Italian is right or not with the environmental influences and what not, still I don't see how it would take later than 2500!!!

 

But I agree that environmental issues affect your body physically, yet some of the things are already in the process of being worked out today. Such as prolonged prolonged stress or depression messing with the chemicals in your brain, which we have several treatments for even today. Although it doesn't always work, as time goes on we will get more advanced and actually manipulate the chemicals directly via brain surgery or nanotechnology. Or a mix of both, amongst other things as well.


Edited by Squillimy, 10 September 2013 - 04:42 PM.

What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#68
Tommy_Vercettix

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I'd say around 2200. But for that we gotta defeat aging.


Edited by Tommy_Vercettix, 11 September 2013 - 11:43 AM.


#69
Lily

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I wonder how humans born after that date (whenever, if ever, 100% health is achieved) will look at tales of dieseases long gone? Will they feel thankful for being born in a time where they don't have to struggle and suffer? Will they take it for granted?


"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#70
FutureOfToday

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Well, I often think about how lucky I am not to be born during a time when the world is going through a plague epidemic, like in the 14th and 17th centuries. I guess it just depends on the individual.

#71
Lily

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^ I have thought the same. If I had been born a century ago, I wouldn't have survived this long. Still, if you imagine that they never had to suffer any disease, they might see it differently? It could be a concept not within their cognitive grasp, they'd just lack the experience.


"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#72
Troodon

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Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I would probably say 2700–2800, and probably in the first half of that century. So around the 2720s or 2730s or so.

#73
Lily

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Do you think we, as a species, will have defeated aging by then?


"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#74
Raklian

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We will defeat aging a lot sooner than we think.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#75
Lily

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2700-2800 sounds a little pessimistic, but I don't expect it to come too soon (next hundred years).

 

What's your estimate?


Edited by Lily, 29 September 2013 - 08:12 PM.

"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#76
FutureOfToday

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around the 2720s or 2730s or so.

That is amusingly specific for a time so far away. xD

#77
xQd

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IMO,aging and most of the diseases will be cured and all the viruses,bacterias,prions which are a threat to human life will be eradicated,all of them by 2050.



#78
Raklian

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2700-2800 sounds a little pessimistic, but I don't expect it to come too soon (next hundred years).

 

What's your estimate?

 

There are 7 or so biological drivers of aging, each with varying degree of complexity.

 

I believe the 1st driver will be cured as early as 2025. It's likely the problem of lysosomal aggregates in key immune cells and retinal cells (leading cause of mascular degeneration) will be the first to go.


What are you without the sum of your parts?




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