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If I could run nasa the way I'd like to(man program)


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#1
Sciencerocks

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If I could run nasa the way I'd like to(man program)

 

 

Goal 1. simply make surface to orbit cheap and reusable. I'd focus on helping Eon musk and his grasshopper concept expand into that vehicle. Goal should be 1/10th current price or better. By 2020 this would go to orbit with humans all the way to the space station like the current dragon ship. Focus on this = success.

Goal 2. Build a "work horse" space ship that is modeled after our navy ships/international space station. You wouldn't build a ship within the navy just to throw it away after one time, would you? Nor should we be doing so now. I'd simply use the bigelow inflated module concept with 2-3 lined up for the human environment attached to a ion engine that can be reused over and over again. Maybe a solar sail for mars missions... https://en.wikipedia...ace_Station.jpg http://cdn.zmescienc...-iss-module.jpg

 

Posted Image

 

This idea would be far cheaper and would be reusable hundreds of times if need be.

Goal 3. Help build the space station in the above link. Much cheaper but roomy then the current international space station. 20-24 people could fit within 4-5 modules.

Goal 4. Use our space ship in 2. to go to the moon and mars ;) We wouldn't have to worry about building a new ship every time we wanted to go some where = much cheaper.

 

 

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Of course I'd carry on with our robotic/probe line up we currently have ;)



#2
Sciencerocks

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I dream of this ;) I won't live to see it.

 

People in the 60s were far too hopeful.



#3
Raklian

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What would happen if NASA miraculously receives the entire US government discretionary budget?

 

 

I suspect the following would happen: NASA will reject this appropriation as they wouldn't know what to do with all of that dough.

 

I think NASA would definitely be more grateful if its budget simply were to double or even triple that of this fiscal year's.


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#4
Sciencerocks

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What would happen if NASA miraculously receives the entire US government discretionary budget?

 

 

I suspect the following would happen: NASA will reject this appropriation as they wouldn't know what to do with all of that dough.

 

I think NASA would definitely be more grateful if its budget simply were to double or even triple that of this fiscal year's.

 

40-60 billion a year + my 4 step plan = a successful program.



#5
JCO

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If NASA is involved in a venture to reduce the cost to orbit it should be on a scale that is well out of the reach of the private sector. Currently reducing the cost of conventional launch vehicles is well within the private sector's reach. NASA can support the private sector's efforts by buying rides from them but competing with these ventures world be counter productive.

 

NASA is at its best when what it is building does not have obvious immediate use to the private sector. If you want NASA to work toward cheap access to orbit, look into the concept of building an elevator from L1 to the Moons surface. This would be a large mission for NASA but not unmanageable. The first completed elevator would likely be little more than a proof of concept and may have a payload limit of about a ton or less. This is a tiny payload but it would be more than enough to ship all the equipment to develop permanent settlements on the Moon.

 

I think NASA should be given more money to develop solar power satellites. This could be even more important than cheap launch cost. Once you have large amounts of power being beamed to the Earth it will not take the private sector long to realize that it is even easier to get the power if you are in orbit. This I think would be the spark for an entirely new industry manufacturing products that can only produced in zero G or in orbit. You may be able to grow much purer and larger silicon crystals. Bio labs would benefit from the perfect isolation.


Confirmed Agnostic - I know that I don't know for sure and I am almost certain no one else does either.





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