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Still alive in 3000


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Poll: Still alive in 3000 (52 member(s) have cast votes)

Which decade born will the oldest people to live to 3000 be?

  1. Voted 1940s or before (6 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  2. 1950s (3 votes [5.77%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.77%

  3. 1960s (6 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  4. 1970s (6 votes [11.54%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.54%

  5. 1980s (10 votes [19.23%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.23%

  6. 1990s (5 votes [9.62%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.62%

  7. 2000s (3 votes [5.77%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.77%

  8. 2010s (2 votes [3.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

  9. 2020s or later (11 votes [21.15%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.15%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#81
FutureOfToday

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"At least a century" - so you seem pretty sure you'll die at some point between 2800 - 2900? :S

#82
RandomInternetStranger

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I'm not sure if it will happen this century, what I am quite certain is that it won't happen before at least the 2070's, and maybe it won't become available to the general public for a reasonable price until 10-20 years later, so 2080's. Which means that most of us will be too old or already dead /sigh. I could be wrong of course because I don't have much of a professional opinion on this, but that's my guess. Cryogenics could be an alternative, but I'm personally too scared of it to consider it. I mean, you would be technically dead for a long period of time and who knows in which state you would be when you wake up (if you do). And what would be going on inside your head while you're "dead", or would you feel nothing whatsoever? And what would be the price for such thing? Our generation could be the first to try it so that's even scarier and many things could go wrong.

 

However, I'm a pessimist so don't take my ramblings too seriously. For all we know we could be having anti-ageing technology as early as the 2050's... But I just wouldn't get my hopes up too high, guys. Bad things happen all the time, but good things? Not so much.

 

EDIT: I meant 2080's! Sorry for the typo in case anyone got confused!

 

If you don't have a professional opinion, then how can you be so certain that anti-aging technology won't become available to the general public before 2070? 

 

I think it really depends on what sort of anti-aging technology we're talking about. From what I can tell, aging is due to multiple factors and mechanisms, not all of which are currently understood. We may be able to mitigate or even reverse one type of aging, but be completely unable to do anything about other types of aging. For example, it might be possible to use stem cell therapies and tissue engineering to rejuvenate tissues and organs into a younger and healthier state, so that a 70-year old has the muscles, bone density, skin, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, etc. of a 30-year old, but it might NOT be possible to rejuvenate the actual brain. So we can keep you from succumbing to heart disease or stroke or cancer, but we can't stop you from eventually succumbing to some kind of age-related dementia. 

 

I actually think the above scenario is the most likely, given what I've seen so far. Regenerative medicine is progressing quite nicely, despite the pessimism I've seen from some people. I think that long before 2070 it'll be possible to allow someone to look and feel MUCH younger than they really are. We are getting better and better at creating stem cells from adult cells, or inducing pluripotency in adult cells, and controlling the fates of these stem cells. Before 2030, or not long after, we'll be able to bioprint and engineer all forms of tissue using these stem cells, effectively creating rejuvenated tissue that works like brand new. But this technology won't be able to address all forms of aging. Like I said, we're still learning about the aging process, and there might be mechanisms that we don't even know about yet. Even when all of the organs and bodily systems are working fine and haven't aged a day, there might be even more subtle effects of aging that cause a person to die when they become too old. So I think people will still be dying of "old age" for a long time to come, but it'll be different from the sort of age-related deaths that you see nowadays. Elderly people in the 2040s, 2050s, 2060s, and 2070s might not be dying of heart attacks or strokes or cancer, but they'll still die of something. 

 

And I don't expect mind-uploading to ever become reality, either. Not before 2100, anyway. 



#83
Brohanne Jahms

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Sort of unrelated, but apparently the first cyrogenically frozen man was born in 1893. That's pretty interesting food for thought.



#84
FutureOfToday

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Didn't think about people who were already cryogenically frozen! I wonder how successful early attempts will be...

#85
KaRdAsHeV~sCaLe

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I picked 1990s


Counting down the days until 2050: 12,499 Humanity = 0.72 on the Kardashev scale
Counting down the days until 2100: 30,761
Counting down the days until 3000: 359,479


#86
JesseBrandon

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So, yesterday I went to my friends' house and their dad took me home afterwards. As usual, he asked me how I was doing and all that, and at some point we talked about a problem of mine and then he told me something. He said, his exact words: "[...] Look, we have to live as happily as possible while we can. Because we're all gonna die someday son. [...]"

 

For a moment I thought of saying something like "No! We don't have to die." He's 37 so it may be too late for him, but maybe his boys (who are younger than me, the youngest is 5) have a chance. But then I thought, why would I say that and embarrass myself? 'Cause I sure know that he would think I'm crazy for believing that anti-ageing technology is possible, that maybe in the not so-far future people won't be born to die. They will be born to live forever. So I kept it to myself and said nothing.

 

But now I feel a little sad, 'cause how great would it be if he found out his sons might not die? If I told him and he believed in this possibility... I think that, even if they do die in the end, their dad would die first and happy believing that they might not die after all. Or maybe I would just make him have hope when it probably won't happen in our life-span anyway... Or he would just make fun of me as I first thought... I don't know. Should I tell him about it? What would you guys do?



#87
GenX

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Something I had just thought of, I wonder how differently picking a spouse would be once humanity not only can live significantly longer then our current life span, but KNOWS that they are going to live that long, barring an accident.  I personally never wanted to get married young.  I always wanted to take my time and make absolute certain that I had picked the best possible mate because I am absolutely dead-set that I'm not going to get married, have kids, and then get divorced.  But now that I'm 36, and expect to live until somewhere around 75 or so (on average), I'm feeling a little bit of pressure that it's time to settle down.  But if I lived for another thousand years, then I wonder how different of a person I would be at age 500 as opposed to 250 or 100 or 36.  I was always afraid that if I got married at age 23 or so that we both would change so much and be totally different people by the time we are age 33 that we may not even like each other anymore, but how would you know how much you might change over the course of a couple hundred years?  I wonder if we'd start seeing marriages that had a specific time limit, like 100 years, and then at the end of hundred year marriage, the couple could reevaluate whether to renew their wedding vows for another 100 years or go their seperate ways. 


The only thing we ever want is more


#88
Lily

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^ Good point. I don't personally believe in all this eternal love and lifelong marriage thing, but I do wonder about the way partnerships/relationships will change if we achieve to extend our lifespans significantly. There are couples, I've heard, who manage to live together for fifty years and still love each other somehow, but what if this period is extended to 150 years? Can love last that long? I don't think so, I just cannot believe in love being sustainable over such a long time.


"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#89
Futurist

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Sort of unrelated, but apparently the first cyrogenically frozen man was born in 1893. That's pretty interesting food for thought.

Didn't one of the members of this forum previously state that cryogenic preservation can only be successful if the bodies are either revived/brought back to life or have the damage in them fixed every fifty years or less, though? If so, and considering that this man died in 1967 (and 2017 - 1967 = 50 years), I don't see this man ever being successfully revived, or at least not without significant/massive/complete and permanent memory loss.



#90
Futurist

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There are couples, I've heard, who manage to live together for fifty years and still love each other somehow, but what if this period is extended to 150 years? Can love last that long? I don't think so, I just cannot believe in love being sustainable over such a long time.

I think that some individuals will be able to love each other for 150+ years. Of course, if a couple is together for 150+ years and is always healthy and capable of working during this time period, then divorce is much more likely for this couple than if their marriage lasted for "only" 50 years or for "only" 20 years.



#91
Cosmic Cat

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Sort of unrelated, but apparently the first cyrogenically frozen man was born in 1893. That's pretty interesting food for thought.

Didn't one of the members of this forum previously state that cryogenic preservation can only be successful if the bodies are either revived/brought back to life or have the damage in them fixed every fifty years or less, though? If so, and considering that this man died in 1967 (and 2017 - 1967 = 50 years), I don't see this man ever being successfully revived, or at least not without significant/massive/complete and permanent memory loss.
Is there a way to regain his memory through therapy? It seems pretty scary to be born again with no memory.

#92
Raklian

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Is there a way to regain his memory through therapy? It seems pretty scary to be born again with no memory.

 

 

How can it be scary?

 

Weren't you already born with no memory, like as in a clean slate?


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#93
Yuli Ban

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I picked 1980s. I'm secretly rooting for myself. :D

 

Having the title "Most Ancient Sentient Being in the Universe" has a nice ring to it. :D

Hang on there, l'ancient one; first, we have to make sure there aren't already 5,000 other "Most Ancient Sentient Beings in the Universe" that are 100x older than humanity itself.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#94
Raklian

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I picked 1980s. I'm secretly rooting for myself. :D

 

Having the title "Most Ancient Sentient Being in the Universe" has a nice ring to it. :D

Hang on there, l'ancient one; first, we have to make sure there aren't already 5,000 other "Most Ancient Sentient Beings in the Universe" that are 100x older than humanity itself.

 

 

Right, I am making a huge, risky assumption that humans are the only (or oldest) existing sentient beings in the entire Universe. Very risky, I'm aware.

 

Any advanced civilization that came before us but died out for some reason don't count. :)


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#95
Yuli Ban

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So, yesterday I went to my friends' house and their dad took me home afterwards. As usual, he asked me how I was doing and all that, and at some point we talked about a problem of mine and then he told me something. He said, his exact words: "[...] Look, we have to live as happily as possible while we can. Because we're all gonna die someday son. [...]"

 

For a moment I thought of saying something like "No! We don't have to die." He's 37 so it may be too late for him, but maybe his boys (who are younger than me, the youngest is 5) have a chance. But then I thought, why would I say that and embarrass myself? 'Cause I sure know that he would think I'm crazy for believing that anti-ageing technology is possible, that maybe in the not so-far future people won't be born to die. They will be born to live forever. So I kept it to myself and said nothing.

 

But now I feel a little sad, 'cause how great would it be if he found out his sons might not die? If I told him and he believed in this possibility... I think that, even if they do die in the end, their dad would die first and happy believing that they might not die after all. Or maybe I would just make him have hope when it probably won't happen in our life-span anyway... Or he would just make fun of me as I first thought... I don't know. Should I tell him about it? What would you guys do?

Note that, to some, the idea of eternal life is more like "eternal hell." It's perfectly possible he might be horrified that his sons might choose to never die. If he's more open to the possibility, maybe his mind could be changed, but for many (to those that believe in an afterlife that is), what's more horrible to die and live in eternal heavenly peace, then learn all your loved ones decided to become immortal. 

To those that don't believe in an afterlife as the West imagines one but nevertheless are against it, they're naturally going to focus on all the negatives of such an alien outlook.

Up until our generation, DEATH. IS. CERTAIN. There is nothing else, there is no way to stop it, we are all going to die. The Fountain of Youth is a myth; you'll die looking for it. All the things we discuss now are things that were mere fantasy, even utterly unimaginable just a few decades ago. Think of it: of people born even up to the 1950s, they will all pass. Maybe a handful of lucky stragglers could make it, but it seems unlikely. Most humans never make it to age 70, let alone 100. If you were born in the '50s, even the '60s (especially for men), you have >20 years, and chances are that 1/3 of you are already dead. If you survived to today, there's a massive chance you're living in your final decade, your final years, no matter how healthy you feel you are. Go back any further, go forward any further and there is virtually no chance. 

Almost everyone born in the 1800s is dead. Everyone born before then is dead. When they were born, they had to accept the awesome, undeniable fact that they were going to die. People born as late as the 1970s were raised with the knowledge that immortality hopes are the stuff of fantasy. But when transhumanist thought hit in the '80s, that all changed.

 

Go from the very start of civilization, of humanity, of life itself, and stop at 1980.  That is the age of Deathists, where all immortality seekers were discarded as schizophrenic, mad, hedonistic, Satanic (unless you put your faith in a man most aren't even sure was what we say he was, or if you somehow find enlightenment from what has since been proven as brain chemistry...).

For them, even if they lived to be 120 and live in the age of Immortality... will they even want to become immortal? They were raised and lived their whole lives believing that death is a given. So even when it comes, they may choose to completely ignore it.

Go from 1980 to today, 2013. This is the age of Immortalists, people that, for the first time, can indeed hold onto real, tangible hope that they can become immortal, no bullshit, and not hold onto negative ideologies. Many won't live to see immortality themselves, as life is a very fragile thing that many lose decades before they should, but they can at least believe that the chance is there, and within their lifetimes.

 

You can't even delude yourself into thinking that a belief forged by primal trait built into our minds over a billion, two billion, possibly three billion years of evolution is going to suddenly be discarded in a few short years and with a couple of vague talks about embryonic technologies just because a bunch of technonerds and robogeeks say that we can overcome death in 20, 40, 80, 100, 15, insert-number years. 

 

I say don't tell him unless you're willing to tell him about all the peripheral things. And if you get a "we'll destroy ourselves/Jesus'll come before then", then just bring up this one possibility that I think many people don't want to consider:

 

What if we don't destroy ourselves? What if Jesus doesn't come? What if we make it to the age of Transhumanism?

 

Then the questions'll only become "Well who would want to live forever, wasting away for the rest of time" or you'll just get "Jesus WILL come, the signs are all there!"


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#96
Cosmic Cat

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Is there a way to regain his memory through therapy? It seems pretty scary to be born again with no memory.

 

 

How can it be scary?

 

Weren't you already born with no memory, like as in a clean slate?

 

But born again. You would not remember everything that has happened before. I mean I was born as a baby, not an adult.



#97
Zatetic

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Aubrey DeGray is making excellent progress with the SENS facillity in combatting and preventing aging all together. The timeline on this website doesnt touch on it (although it is cited as a source for something in 2250+), but his most recent TEDtalk touched on a rough timeline assuming funding requirements are met and nanotechnological advancements are made in a timely fashion. We're looking at the elimination of almost all old age ailments (dementia, alzheimers etc) by around 2035. This has the potential to include the elimination of corrupted cells through the use of nanotechnology which would also eliminate a significant number of cancerous growths.

 

Combine that with advancements in stem cell research and custom organ growth and I think we have a good chance of beating aging all together by 2060. The biggest issue isn't physical though. What happens to a persons mental state when they spend so long alive? Surely that has some rather taxing negative effects on a person. Particularly with the growing rate of depression in young adults.

 

Personally, I'd love to live a thousand years. Once my childhood distant future becomes the present, I'm not sure if I'll want to continue living. I'm mostly interested in extended life for the sake of advancements in space travel and the colonization of other planets. If I live to see us hit a Level 1 civilization (or even a Level 2 if things are going well), I feel I'll be able to die a happy man. It is too difficult to comprehend further than 1000 years into the future for me. It seems too ambitious and mentally exhausting.



#98
Zeitgeist123

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I didn't vote, either. I don't expect to live to see the year 3000, and I turn 30 next month. And I don't think anyone currently alive today will be alive in the year 3000, either. Not even newborns. I'm skeptical of even living to see my 150th birthday. Having said that, I don't necessarily think anti-aging research and regenerative medicine is all hype. I think within my lifetime it will be possible to dramatically minimize the worst symptoms of aging, such as macular degeneration, arthritis, heart disease, several forms of cancer, Alzheimer's, and so on. I think in the next few decades we'll see many exciting developments in the field of regenerative medicine, such as using induced-pluripotent stem cells to make certain tissues "younger", such as heart tissue, muscles, bone, and cartilage, allowing an elderly person to be just as fit and active as someone much younger. Maybe even appearance-wise, we'll be able to make an older person look and feel decades younger. No more wrinkly skin, greying or balding hair, loss of teeth, etc. I'm cautiously optimistic that many age-related ailments will be quite manageable in my lifetime due to advancements in stem cell therapies, gene therapies, tissue engineering, bioprinting, and when those aren't enough, brain-computer interfaces, cybernetics, robotics, etc. There's already a gene therapy that dramatically reduces heart disease which is undergoing clinical trials, so it's not all "centuries away".

 

But none of this adds up to immortality, or even a dramatically increased lifespan. We'll probably be able to rejuvenate all sorts of tissues and organs, at least to some degree, but not the brain, which is the most important organ of all if you're interested in personal survival. And even if we did, it would only hold off the inevitable, because aging is extremely complex that involves tons of factors. We could keep injecting iPSCs, keep bioprinting newer and younger tissues and organs, but the march of time is inevitable. I think my shot of living to be 90 or 100 is decent, and hopefully I'll be pretty active and vigorous (and not half bad looking, LOL), towards the end, but I don't think actual immortality will be possible for centuries.

i just cant seem to get myself into thinking that at the time we have been able to develop and pratically apply regenerative medicine and anti-aging therapies, (not to mention, reverse aging and also the fact that technology grows exponentially) we wont have immortality as an option. what about aging escape velocity? and also the fact that immortality is biologically possible? (hello immortal jellyfish). what i think is: immortality is just too big a word for us right now but if we can possibly cure aging, then how are we going to die from a natural death due to old age? our understanding on brain/consciousness is currently in its infancy stage, but what makes us think it would be the same in the next 30 years? 


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates





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