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Multi-planetary civilization: Mars & Moon but what's next?


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#61
StanleyAlexander

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The resources gained from going outwards will increase our wealth to where modifying inner system will be affordable. tHe biggest issue with venus is its rotation. We would need to find out how to spin it up. Lots of energy, how do we apply it?

How about do an asteroid impact to venus in a position and exact impact area?

 

In 2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson (of Mars Trilogy awesomeness), a ~70 year plan to terraform Venus is underway.  It includes many asteroid impacts orchestrated with extreme precision over decades to accelerate Venus' rotation, and a "sun shield" in heliocentric orbit between the star and Venus.  The vulnerability of the sun shield to economic leverage and terrorist attack is emphasized.  The asteroid impacts are incredibly destructive and Venusian land is valuable only in very long term markets; civilian colonization must wait.

 

Incidentally, in this storyline the Jovian moons have been colonized for over a century :)


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#62
OrbitalResonance

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i have returned


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#63
Raklian

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For more dramatic effect or flair in a British manner, say "I am returned!!!" :)


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#64
Ru1138

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The asteroid belt might have plenty of real estate.

 

http://www.orbitbooks.net/2312/


What difference does it make?


#65
StanleyAlexander

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The asteroid belt might have plenty of real estate.

 

http://www.orbitbooks.net/2312/

Reading about the logistics of building a biome inside an asteroid is so awesome it makes my face look like this

Posted Image


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#66
Ru1138

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The asteroid belt might have plenty of real estate.

 

http://www.orbitbooks.net/2312/

Reading about the logistics of building a biome inside an asteroid is so awesome it makes my face look like this

 

[SNIP]

 

 

Glad you like it. It seems like it would be viable sometime in the future.


What difference does it make?


#67
jamesgera

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i think we should leave Jupiter's and Saturn's moons alone. they carry a belief that life might be on some of these moons and if this is true it would be best to leave them alone to let the life evolve and not go extinct due to us moving in on their homes.

 

i believe we should start build space stations. like the citadel from Mass Effect.

in the future i believe people will live on either planets, moons, under the sea, in the air like your Venus idea or in space stations.

 

they will be built to carry hundreds or thousands of people will be massive in size and will have a system that makes the inside look like Earth.

 



#68
OrbitalResonance

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Im necroing this thread to post this awesome depiction of the first colonies on venus. Safely floating in the safezone 50 km above the surface.

 

stratospheric_colony_by_phade01-d7uvz6m.

 

http://phade01.devia...olony-475143646


We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#69
JCO

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The core of Venus isn't too hot. Our own core is molten, so what? By the way, according to the wiki, it's no even yet known for sure if the core of Venus is actually liquid or not. This means that it can easily be colder than ours. The problem is the surface, which is primarily heated up by the sun.

 

Actually the Earth's core is believed to be solid. Most of the mantel is believed to be plastic. Only parts of the crust heated by friction from moving across the mantel is believed to be molten. Venus on the other hand appears to have gone through a period of volcanism about the time life arose on earth that completely resurfaced the planet. I has been suggested that Venus traps so much energy from the Sun that it periodically has to turn entirely molten to release the stored heat. If we entirely blocked the Sun from Venus it might take a century before it was cool enough for the next stage of a terraforming project.

 

I believe that Mars will be the second major area colonization beyond Earth. I think it will be colonized more as a stepping to the outer solar system than for its own benefits. I do not think we will terraform Mars. I think by the time we are able to take on a project of that size we will be so good at creating smaller closed environment that changing the environment of Mars will not be seen as that useful.

 

On the original subject I do not think the next step beyond Mars will be another planet or moon. As I said by that time we will be very good at creating self-sustaining closed system. I think as a race we will begin evolving away from being based in deep gravity wells. The asteroid belt will be the next easy source of resources. There will be small colonies on some of the gas giant moons but these will be more remote mining platforms while the majority of habitation near the gas giant will be in high orbit.


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#70
Raklian

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i think we should leave Jupiter's and Saturn's moons alone. they carry a belief that life might be on some of these moons and if this is true it would be best to leave them alone to let the life evolve and not go extinct due to us moving in on their homes.

 

All these worlds are yours, except Europa. Attempt no landings there. - 2010: Odyssey Two


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#71
Cosmic Cat

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I would exploit the hell out of Europa's fresh water.

The product's name: Celestial water, water from another world.

#72
JCO

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"Celestial Water", I like the idea. Reminds me of my own prediction that the first commercial success from space will be, gem quality stones from the Moon. What billionaire trophy bride would not want jewelry that is literally out of this world.


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#73
OrbitalResonance

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Venus on the other hand appears to have gone through a period of volcanism about the time life arose on earth that completely resurfaced the planet. I has been suggested that Venus traps so much energy from the Sun that it periodically has to turn entirely molten to release the stored heat. If we entirely blocked the Sun from Venus it might take a century before it was cool enough for the next stage of a terraforming project.

 

 

I think its more like heat from inside has trouble getting out casue no plate tectonics to spend energy on and volcanoes alone are not sufficient. So it periodically builds up to a overloading point then suddenly spills out resurfaces the entire planet.


We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#74
Jakob

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I think that after the moon and mars, we'll head to the Ceres and the major asteroids (in the 2030s and 2040s) and shortly after the Jovian moons (late 2050s or 2060s). Later, we'll visit the Saturnian moons, perhaps in the 2070s and 2080s. Mercury is a possibility by 2100, followed by the moons of the ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) by the middle of the 22nd century. The Kuiper Belt objects (Pluto, Eris, etc.) and Venus will probably be the last major Solar System bodies to be inhabited, after 2200, due to their inaccessibility.

 

Note that I'm talking about humans visiting these places, not full-scale colonization by many thousands or millions, which would be decades after the first human exploration.



#75
TheAsianGuy_LOL

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I think that after the moon and mars, we'll head to the Ceres and the major asteroids (in the 2030s and 2040s) and shortly after the Jovian moons (late 2050s or 2060s). Later, we'll visit the Saturnian moons, perhaps in the 2070s and 2080s. Mercury is a possibility by 2100, followed by the moons of the ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) by the middle of the 22nd century. The Kuiper Belt objects (Pluto, Eris, etc.) and Venus will probably be the last major Solar System bodies to be inhabited, after 2200, due to their inaccessibility.

 

Note that I'm talking about humans visiting these places, not full-scale colonization by many thousands or millions, which would be decades after the first human exploration.

You're right on, but in my opinion, Venus may be explored earlier and Mercury is only going to be a mining planet. And also those few humans who wants to go interstellar for exploration reasons in around the 2150's where there's some interstellar probes modified to carry humans (note this is just exploration, not seeding or colonizing).


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