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Do you think immortality is possible?


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#41
JesseBrandon

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These threads always depress me so much. Let's see, is immortality possible? I think so, now will it be possible in our lifetimes? That's what no one can be sure of. Personally I think that it won't be possible until the 2070's at the very least (based off of what I've read, the timeline etc., but it's just speculation obviously), and that means that most of us will be in our 70's, 80's or even 90's. Our parents, grandparents and actually any people who today are over 40 will be dead by then, IMO. And for those of us who are under 40, how many of us will live to see the year 2070? We'll have to avoid mortal illnesses and all kinds of accidents and dangers for 50+ years, which is not so easy (I'd say that between 10-30% of us will die of something within these 50+ years, but probably less as science and medicine get better each year). And of course, if life extension happens later than the 2070's and/or becomes available to the "poor" people later than that, then we're screwed. But maybe I'm just being pessimistic, maybe it will happen sooner, like in the 2050's, and elderly people today will get resurrected, and everyone will get to live forever LOL, but I don't think so. I just know that I don't want to die but odds are that I will. :/



#42
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again there is the option of cryopreservation



#43
Glory of the quasars

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These threads always depress me so much. Let's see, is immortality possible? I think so, now will it be possible in our lifetimes? That's what no one can be sure of. Personally I think that it won't be possible until the 2070's at the very least (based off of what I've read, the timeline etc., but it's just speculation obviously), and that means that most of us will be in our 70's, 80's or even 90's. Our parents, grandparents and actually any people who today are over 40 will be dead by then, IMO. And for those of us who are under 40, how many of us will live to see the year 2070? We'll have to avoid mortal illnesses and all kinds of accidents and dangers for 50+ years, which is not so easy (I'd say that between 10-30% of us will die of something within these 50+ years, but probably less as science and medicine get better each year). And of course, if life extension happens later than the 2070's and/or becomes available to the "poor" people later than that, then we're screwed. But maybe I'm just being pessimistic, maybe it will happen sooner, like in the 2050's, and elderly people today will get resurrected, and everyone will get to live forever LOL, but I don't think so. I just know that I don't want to die but odds are that I will. :/

 

I know that we're here to talk about predictions of the future, but you seem to undervaluate what role has fortuity played in the history. The timeline estimate is neither conservative or optimstic: it's just what is realistic to think, based on what we know now. But that's the point: we don't know what we still don't know, and so we can't really say if it will be harder than what we initiallly thought (thus requiring more years, maybe 2100+), and at the same time we can't know if some huge discovery is waiting for us in 5 years, changing the world forever and way before our time estimations. Fact is, we can't settle time predictions for the development of a technology that doesn't already exist: take 3d-bioprinting for example; know we're capable to say that in 20-30 years it will deliver functioning human organs, but could we even remotely think to this possibility before that 3d-bioprinting itself popped-up? We don't have to be depressed or anxious; what we can do is see what happens and adapt to it, trying to pursue this way.



#44
Mike the average

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I think we would actually be an embarrassment to the human race if we hadn't worked out some early form of immortality by 2100 considering the staggering amount of money being thrown into biotech these days, add to that the other developing technologies and developing nations resources for that matter.

 

 


'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#45
Ghostreaper

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Looking at the amount of advancements being made with ageing related research currently I can't imagine anything short of WWIII stopping it's progress, though WWIII isn't an impossibility right now :(


“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#46
Mike the average

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I cant find a country out there talking about preventing it either

 

We criticise americans with their gun laws at the individual level, yet internationally every country is armed to the teeth ready to fight that special someone.


'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#47
centrino207‎

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I've read a lot on the internet about the concepts of immortality, and how it can be achieved. One suggestion might be to use nanobots that constantly repair the body and thus keep it alive, but nanobots also have many drawbacks as they might cause more harm. What do you think about this topic?

 

Scientist still don't know what causes autoimmune diseases or hard to cure it.But there are many many many different types of autoimmune diseases.

 

Cancer is big mystery of what causes it.The Scientists and doctors are still trying to find out what causes cancer.



#48
Raklian

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I've read a lot on the internet about the concepts of immortality, and how it can be achieved. One suggestion might be to use nanobots that constantly repair the body and thus keep it alive, but nanobots also have many drawbacks as they might cause more harm. What do you think about this topic?

 

Scientist still don't know what causes autoimmune diseases or hard to cure it.But there are many many many different types of autoimmune diseases.

 

Cancer is big mystery of what causes it.The Scientists and doctors are still trying to find out what causes cancer.

 

 

To hell with human doctors and scientists. LET.... THE.... A.I.... DO.... THE.... R&D!


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#49
JesseBrandon

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These threads always depress me so much. Let's see, is immortality possible? I think so, now will it be possible in our lifetimes? That's what no one can be sure of. Personally I think that it won't be possible until the 2070's at the very least (based off of what I've read, the timeline etc., but it's just speculation obviously), and that means that most of us will be in our 70's, 80's or even 90's. Our parents, grandparents and actually any people who today are over 40 will be dead by then, IMO. And for those of us who are under 40, how many of us will live to see the year 2070? We'll have to avoid mortal illnesses and all kinds of accidents and dangers for 50+ years, which is not so easy (I'd say that between 10-30% of us will die of something within these 50+ years, but probably less as science and medicine get better each year). And of course, if life extension happens later than the 2070's and/or becomes available to the "poor" people later than that, then we're screwed. But maybe I'm just being pessimistic, maybe it will happen sooner, like in the 2050's, and elderly people today will get resurrected, and everyone will get to live forever LOL, but I don't think so. I just know that I don't want to die but odds are that I will. :/

 

I know that we're here to talk about predictions of the future, but you seem to undervaluate what role has fortuity played in the history. The timeline estimate is neither conservative or optimstic: it's just what is realistic to think, based on what we know now. But that's the point: we don't know what we still don't know, and so we can't really say if it will be harder than what we initiallly thought (thus requiring more years, maybe 2100+), and at the same time we can't know if some huge discovery is waiting for us in 5 years, changing the world forever and way before our time estimations. Fact is, we can't settle time predictions for the development of a technology that doesn't already exist: take 3d-bioprinting for example; know we're capable to say that in 20-30 years it will deliver functioning human organs, but could we even remotely think to this possibility before that 3d-bioprinting itself popped-up? We don't have to be depressed or anxious; what we can do is see what happens and adapt to it, trying to pursue this way.

 

I do take fortuity into account, that's why I said that the 2070's just seems the most logical time IMO but that life extension could as well happen much later or much earlier than that. But yeah you're right. We just don't know. I'm wondering, what will people's life expectancy be in 20 years? surely there won't be any anti-ageing technology by 2035, but with medicine progressing so much and so fast, could people's life-span be at least 90 years by then? Or will people still die in their 70's and even 60's?



#50
Raklian

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Guys, just relax. There is always the cyropreservation method to fall back on. Better that than being dead and rotting in some dirt.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#51
CyberMisterBeauty

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[color=#ee82ee;][font="verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"]Yes,immortality is possible at least in my opinion.With Mind Uploading,at least.you would upload your mind into Internet and virtual reality and put your synthetic brain into a robotic body which would be 1000x more stable and durable than a living being.With a robotic body you would be ageless,free of all diseases and pretty tough and resistant.You would eat whatever you want without the fear of gaining fat or health problems.[/color][/font]

 

[color=#ee82ee;][font="verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"]Even someone who did mind uploading but didn't opted for the artificial body they would still be immortal because if they physically dies,their minds and consciousness will continue to exist virtually. [/color][/font]



#52
zEVerzan

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Everything comes to an end eventually. One cannot live to infinity.

 

Immortality (as in never dying) is impossible. However, clinical immortality can be achieved, but will only delay the inevitable. If you don't die to age, you will die to entropy. If we find a way to escape that, we can only delay the inevitable.


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#53
StanleyAlexander

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Everything comes to an end eventually. One cannot live to infinity.

 

Immortality (as in never dying) is impossible. However, clinical immortality can be achieved, but will only delay the inevitable. If you don't die to age, you will die to entropy. If we find a way to escape that, we can only delay the inevitable.

Even if we were to make some kind of.....exo-temporal excursion, and transcend space-time altogether?


Humanity's destiny is infinity

#54
zEVerzan

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Maayyyyyybe. :)

 

Time travel/ interdimensional travel is a big "if".

 

EDIT: then again, trillions of years must be enough time to find everything we could ever need to know and more. I'd say transcending space and time can be done.


I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
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#55
Squillimy

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Everything comes to an end eventually. One cannot live to infinity.

 

Immortality (as in never dying) is impossible. However, clinical immortality can be achieved, but will only delay the inevitable. If you don't die to age, you will die to entropy. If we find a way to escape that, we can only delay the inevitable.

 

eeeeh I think by the time that comes we'll have some way to fully prevent us from dying (accidents included).

 

I mean, if we're talking billions or even trillions of years from now.


What becomes of man when the things that man can create are greater than man itself?


#56
CyberMisterBeauty

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[color=#ee82ee;][font="verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"]For those who think immortality is impossible,do you guys think that reverse aging is impossible as well?[/color][/font]



#57
Raklian

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Well, we know immortality and aging reversal are two completely different things. The fact you don't age anymore doesn't imply you've become immortal - far from it.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#58
Ghostreaper

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Are we talking immortality or invincibility? I always assumed immortality went hand in hand with ageing, if you are immortal you can still be killed. Invincibility is what I assumed was the ability to avoid death by any means.


“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#59
CyberMisterBeauty

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Well, we know immortality and aging reversal are two completely different things. The fact you don't age anymore doesn't imply you've become immortal - far from it.

 

[color=#ee82ee;][font="verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"]If aging is cured and reversed,people would be immortal biologically.They'd never die from old age and their relative diseases and deteriorating body and health.However,of course they could still die from other meanings,like accidents,homicides etc.[/color][/font]



#60
Frizz

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Well, we know immortality and aging reversal are two completely different things. The fact you don't age anymore doesn't imply you've become immortal - far from it.

 
[color=#ee82ee;][font="verdana, geneva, sans-serif;"]If aging is cured and reversed,people would be immortal biologically.They'd never die from old age and their relative diseases and deteriorating body and health.However,of course they could still die from other meanings,like accidents,homicides etc.[/color][/font]
Immortality by definition is enternal life, something which is fundamentally unattainable.
“Give me time and I’ll give you a revolution.”
- Alexander McQueen




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