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Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

lab grown meat lab grown food in vitro meat stem cells biotechnology food production meat farming

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#41
Yuli Ban

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Indeed. I love meat. I love it a lot.

Screen-Shot-2015-03-14-at-20.09.38.png?m

But the extraordinary brutality of factory farms is too much. I remember when that one video of a cow being mistreated went viral about 8 or 9 years back— my Southern-born-and-raised mother went vegetarian for several weeks just because of it. She ultimately relapsed back into carnivorism (and I was much too young to know or really care, so I went on eatin' meat), but I hafta admit, the number of vegetarians and vegans that video created is impressive. I know some people who are still either vegetarian or vegan.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#42
Yuli Ban

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How to Feed Ten Billion: Lab-Made 'Clean Meat' Burgers are Future of Food

The rapid growth of the world's human population raises the issue of more efficient food production; one solution to the problem is "clean meat," which is produced in the equivalent of meat fermenters, Bruce Friedrich, Executive Director of the Good Food Institute, told Radio Sputnik.

The world's human population reached 7.4 billion in March 2016, having reached 7 billion in October 2011. In 2050, it is expected to reach 9.7 billion, raising the question of how to produce enough food for everybody.
Bruce Friedrich, Executive Director of the Good Food Institute, told Radio Sputnik that current methods of agricultural production are using energy inefficiently.
 

"Current techniques put at least nine calories into an animal, to get one calorie back out in the form of that animal's flesh. We'd need about five more planets to feed 9.7 billion people if we wanted to feed them all proportionally as much animal meat as people are eating today," Friedrich said.

 


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#43
voluntaryist

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Indeed. I love meat. I love it a lot.

Screen-Shot-2015-03-14-at-20.09.38.png?m

But the extraordinary brutality of factory farms is too much. I remember when that one video of a cow being mistreated went viral about 8 or 9 years back— my Southern-born-and-raised mother went vegetarian for several weeks just because of it. She ultimately relapsed back into carnivorism (and I was much too young to know or really care, so I went on eatin' meat), but I hafta admit, the number of vegetarians and vegans that video created is impressive. I know some people who are still either vegetarian or vegan.

 

I've been an ethical vegan for just under a year.  



#44
Yuli Ban

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A few charts, graphs, and statistics that will soon go into the proper thread for such things

ag_environmental_impact_0.jpg

_69060085_meat_comp.gif

InVitroMeatComplete.png


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#45
Yuli Ban

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As lab-grown meat and milk inch closer to U.S. market, industry wonders who will regulate?

The first hamburger cooked with labmade meat didn’t get rave reviews for taste. But the test tube burger, rolled out to the press in 2013, has helped put a spotlight on the question of how the U.S. government will regulate the emerging field of cellular agriculture, which uses biotechnology instead of animals to make products such as meat, milk, and egg whites.
So far, none of these synthetic foods has reached the marketplace. But a handful of startup companies in the United States and elsewhere are trying to scale up production. In the San Francisco Bay area in California, entrepreneurs at Memphis Meats hope to have their cell-cultured meatballs, hot dogs, and sausages on store shelves in about 5 years, and those atPerfect Day are targeting the end of 2017 to distribute cow-free dairy products. It’s not clear, however, which government agencies would oversee this potential new food supply.
Historically, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates meat, poultry, and eggs, whereas the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees safety and security for food additives. FDA also approves so-called biologics, which include products made from human tissues, blood, and cells, and gene therapy techniques. But emerging biotechnologies may blur those lines of oversight, because some of the new foods don’t fit neatly into existing regulatory definitions. “Cellular culture raises a lot of questions,” says Isha Datar, CEO of New Harvest, a New York City–based nonprofit founded to support this nascent industry.
To help provide answers, the White House last year launched an initiative to review and overhaul how U.S. agencies regulate agricultural biotechnology. And the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, D.C., is working on abroader study of future biotechnology developments and regulation, with a report slated for release at the end of this year.
In the meantime, industry leaders are thinking about how their potential lab-based foods might be handled by regulators.

cultured-beef-02.jpg?itok=k2H9kVVn&times
In 2013, researchers from Maastricht University in the Netherlands unveiled a burger made from cultured beef. How the United States would regulate such products is unclear. David Parry/PA Wire


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#46
Yuli Ban

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Cultured Meat Will Remain a Distant Dream Unless We Do These 4 Things

In 2013 the world’s first cell-cultured hamburger was cooked and tasted live on air.
Following that event, there have been many mentions of cultured meat in the media. With all this discussion and publicity, it’s easy to assume your local grocery store will soon be stocking cultured bacon and chicken wings. However, the reality is starkly different; the era of cultured meat is far off. Although the concept has been proven, producing cultured meat in mass quantities remains an idea. It’s an idea with huge potential, but it’s still severely underfunded.

Why would anyone want cultured meat?

Our current meat production system is broken in many ways. It’s unsustainable in the long run: today, we use 30% of Earth's ice-free land to feed animals to make protein for us. The livestock sector produces nearly 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Overall, the current system offers too many opportunities to harm us via E. coli, Salmonella, antibiotic resistance, eutrophication, loss of biodiversity, and air pollution.So if we want meat, why can’t we grow it? Why produce an entire living organism as an inefficient intermediary?
Cultured meat offers a route to safer, healthier, and cruelty-free meat that is 100% identical to conventional meat. The technology is expected to be less harsh on the environment, reducing the need for scarce fresh water, land, and fuel while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions and antibiotic resistance.
Not to mention, major improvements in efficiency are anticipated.


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#47
Yuli Ban

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A burger by any other name: What do we call lab-grown meat?

Meat manufactured in factories, without animals, could soon find its way to your dinner plate.
So-called "lab-grown meat" has been in development for years. Now,lobbying efforts are underway to set regulations which would allow the stuff to be sold.
CBC food columnist Khalil Akhtar explains why some lobbyists also want lab-grown meat to get a new name.
What's the problem with calling it 'lab meat'?
"Clean meat" is the name preferred by the Good Food Institute — a non-profit lobby group for plant based meat alternatives and the stuff he calls clean meat.
"Animal-free meat" or "cultured meat" are other alternatives.
Whatever it's called, you've probably heard of the stuff. 
Basically, producers would culture animal cells, and essentially grow animal protein in a factory-like setting.
Bruce Friedrich, the director of the Good Food Institute, says we should picture a brewery rather than a slaughterhouse. And that's why he likes the "clean meat" label.
"Our main problem with 'lab-grown' meat is that it's inaccurate," he said.
"Nobody will be buying lab-grown meat. They will be buying factory-produced meat. And what it will look like at scale is basically meat fermenters. It will look like a brewery."


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#48
Yuli Ban

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Tyson Foods just launched a $150m venture-capital firm to invest in meat-alternatives, including the potential of investing in lab-grown cultured meat, and other initiatives

As plant-based foods and meatless meats gain ground with consumers for health and environmental reasons, companies like Tyson Foods -- a chicken, beef and pork purveyor whose name is practically synonymous with the word meat -- have had to think about how to remain competitive. It's an existential question, to be sure, but already, one potential solution has emerged: create a venture capital arm aimed at investing in alternative forms of protein and food sustainability.
Tyson announced Monday that it has launched a $150 million venture capital fund, called Tyson New Ventures LLC. The company has said the fund will complement its existing investments and will focus on companies that are developing "breakthrough" technology and business models.
And, of course, meatless meats. The fund's first investment involves Tyson's five-percent stake in Beyond Meats (a company making burgers, chicken and other traditional "meat" out of peas, chicken fiber and more), which was first announced in October. At the time, Tyson executive vice president of strategy Monica McGurk said that Tyson was excited about the stake (the full financial terms were not disclosed), because it gave Tyson "exposure to a fast-growing segment of the protein market."

On Monday, McGurk praised Tyson's new step, saying in a statement, "This fund is about broadening our exposure to innovative, new forms of protein and ways of producing food, while remaining focused on our core fresh meats, poultry and prepared foods businesses, which are also experiencing tremendous consumer demand and growth."


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#49
illykitty

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Saw that a while back, some vegans thought of boycotting Beyond Meat because of this stake. Completely missing the bigger picture and frankly stupid, in my opinion.

 

As someone that's vegan 99% of the time, I think it's great that these companies are seeing a bigger market for plant based meats and investing. It will lead to better products and more diversity, meaning more things for people to try out. Here in the UK, there's a lot of vegetarian stuff but it's only in the past two year or so that I noticed more vegan stuff appearing in shops and restaurants. I've now got a huge selection to chose from, even junk food, for better or worse (cashew chocolate ice cream, yum).

 

On a side note, I donated to a cultured meat company. I really want this technology to become commercial ASAP and thought it would be a good idea to help them out. My main concerns with meat are ethical and environmental, I have no problems and even understand liking to eat meat. I'm part cat so I have to actively fight my nature. :p



#50
Yuli Ban

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World’s first clean beef fajita, grown from animal cells without the actual animal, was just unveiled


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#51
Yuli Ban

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#52
Yuli Ban

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Clean, safe, humane — producers say lab meat is a triple win

“The meatball that changed the world.”
That was the enthusiastic prediction early last year from Uma Valeti, a cardiologist and now CEO of Memphis Meats, as he admired the freshly cooked meatball arranged gourmet-style on a plate.

“It tastes like a meatball,” she said. “It tastes good.”As a meatball, it definitely had a lot going for it. It was made by specialty chef Dave Anderson, using an Italian recipe. As it cooked in the frying pan, (click here to watch the video) it sizzled and smelled the way a meatball should. And the taste-tester gave it a thumbs-up.
Turns out that the meatball had been produced in a lab by using cells extracted from a live cow and grown into tissues and then muscle. Some people refer to it as lab meat or cultured meat, but researchers and industry leaders prefer to call it “clean meat.”


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#53
Yuli Ban

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Scientists Use Stem Cells To Grow Animal-Free Pork In A Lab

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports has taken us one step closer to the dream of animal-free meat

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports has taken us one step closer to the dream of animal-free meat. (And, no, in case your mind immediately goes to the 1973 sci-fi movie Soylent Green, it ain’t people, either!)
“What the paper describes is research designed to generate muscle from a newly established pig stem-cell line, rather that from primary cells taken directly from a pig,” co-author Dr. Nicholas Genovese, a stem-cell biologist (and vegetarian), told Digital Trends. “This entailed understanding the biology of relatively uncharacterized and recently-derived porcine induced pluripotent stem cell lines. What conditions support cell growth, survival and differentiation? These are all questions I had to figure out in the lab before the cells could be turned into muscle.”


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#54
Yuli Ban

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Historic Moment For Clean Meat

Yesterday, I ate duck a l’orange in a kitchen where Julia Child once taught. But this was duck grown directly from cells – not from breeding, raising, and slaughtering animals. Next, I moved on to some fried chicken (also slaughter-free).   
 
This was courtesy of the Bay Area startup Memphis Meats, which has just become the first company in history to produce clean poultry: a milestone for the clean meat industry. 
 
Alongside Good Food Institute Senior Scientist Christie Lagally, the Memphis Meats team, and CEO Dr. Uma Valeti’s family (Valeti’s daughter had made a specific request for fried chicken), I was able to taste the future. 
 
And I went back for seconds. 
 
During the reveal of these new products, I was wondering what the team that sent Apollo 11 to the moon felt like as the rocket lifted from the launch pad – or what was going through Henry Ford’s mind just before he unveiled the first Model T. 
 
I'm left to wonder; but Uma Valeti, M.D., knows. 
 
He knows what it feels like to do something that has never been done – to do something with the potential to change the trajectory of human history. By producing clean meat, Memphis Meats has sounded the death knell for factory farming, along with the devastation this outdated system has wrought on our environment and public health.


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#55
Raklian

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Urban meat vats and vertical farms... here we come!


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#56
Yuli Ban

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A San Francisco startup just created the world's first lab-grown chicken

San Francisco-based startup Memphis Meats says it has made the world's first lab-grown chicken strips from animal cells.
On March 14, Memphis Meats invited a handful of taste-testers to their kitchen to try it. And according to the company, they said it tastes just like chicken.
"It is thrilling to introduce the first chicken and duck that didn’t require raising animals. This is a historic moment for the clean meat movement," Memphis Meats' cofounder and CEO, Uma Valeti, said in a press release.
In February 2016, the company said it had produced lab-grown meatballs, made by cultivating cow muscle tissue in a sterile environment. In addition to chicken, Memphis Meat announced on March 15 that it has cultivated lab-grown duck as well. The team said it expects to reduce production costs over the next few years, and start offering its products to the public in 2021.
Memphis Meats is one of many startups aiming to cut down on our reliance on traditional meat. Dr. Mark Post, researcher in Maastricht, Netherlands, made a lab-grown burger in 2013 and subsequently launched a company called Mosa Meats to further his work. Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat sell plant-based beef and chicken that taste eerily similar to the real thing.

'Eerily similar' is not the same as 'the same thing, just cultivated a different way'. Hence why clean meat will emerge victorious over "plant-based" meats in the end.


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#57
Raklian

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I look forward to the day when I don't have to agonize over whether I'll chew bits of hardened fat while eating chicken.


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#58
Yuli Ban

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One-third of Americans are willing to eat lab-grown meat regularly

They're also more willing to eat dog, cat, and horse meat if it's grown in a lab

Are we on the cusp of the consumer biotech age, when lab-grown meat will be just as common as farmed meat? Recently, a company called Memphis Meats started selling in-vitro meat (IVM) that apparently tastes just like delicious chicken and duck. But if we want the price on an IVM burger to get below $1,000, we need consumers to buy lots of the stuff. That's why two Australian researchers from the University of Queensland decided to study what the US public currently thinks about eating IVM.
Psychologist Matti Wilks and veterinary scientist Clive Phillips surveyed 673 people via Mechanical Turk, asking a wide range of questions about their backgrounds and attitudes toward meat eating. What they found is that roughly two-thirds of their subjects would be willing to try IVM, and a third thought it might become a regular part of their diets. Wilks and Phillips suggest that this means people are open to eating IVM, but don't think it would replace farmed meat.

I'd even eat primate meat (including human meat!) if I knew it were farm/lab-grown.

The only reason why I don't already eat human meat is because the method of obtaining it isn't exactly condoned by the law or human moral values. Also, there's the problem of kuru.


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#59
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This also means two-third aren't willing. Comes the time lab meat becomes mainstream and as affordable as ordinary meat, I wonder what will happen. I'd say the ethical side far outweighs people who are basically "weirded out" by lab meat and it only makes sense to massively shut down factory farms from day 1. 

 

But as long as ritual slaughter is also still allowed in secular nations, I'm afraid this also won't be that easy. When you look up videos about vitro meat on youtube, comment sections are also full of people who eat meat but vow to never even touch lab grown meat just because they find it weird.

 

And it annoys me.



#60
illykitty

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Meh, the rest of the people will follow the 1/3 that does chose to eat it. They'll see it's the same thing, except with benefits. Especially when it becomes affordable and trendy. I don't mean to sound harsh but a lot of people follow things just because it's trendy and other "cool" people are doing it.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lab grown meat, lab grown food, in vitro meat, stem cells, biotechnology, food production, meat farming

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