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Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

lab grown meat lab grown food in vitro meat stem cells biotechnology food production meat farming

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#101
Zaphod

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Just remembered that a while ago I started writing a quick future timeline of the next decade or so about cultured meat, but now I look at it the dates are probably a bit off:

 

2013
  • World's first lab-grown burger was cooked and eaten at a news conference in London at a cost of $325,000.
 
2016-2018
  • A number of startups such as Memphis Meats, Supermeat and JUST begin to develop a range of meat products. Billionaires such as Bill Gates and Richard Branson were some of the people backing these companies. Many traditional meat companies and stakeholders start campaigning for lab-grown meat to not be called “meat”, this fails, but they are successful in lab-grown products having to be clearly labelled as not coming from a live animal. 
 
2019-2020
 
  • The first lab-grown meats are available initially at certain restaurants and then some supermarkets. At first, these were very expensive and relatively poor quality. The first products consisted of ground meats such as burgers, sausages, meatballs, and chicken nuggets. Demand for these products are initially high as people enjoy the novelty of trying lab-grown meats for the first time and for the first few weeks they become sold out. Similarly, some consumers who are vegetarians and vegans for ethical and environmental reasons begin to occasionally buy lab-grown meat as a treat. A large proportion of the population still finds the idea of lab-grown meat distasteful and do not try it. The market share in developed nations is less than 1%.
 
2021-2024
  • During this period the lab-grown meat market grows considerably, but the price and quality still doesn’t match traditional meats. Most consumers prefer to buy traditional meats instead and cultured meat still has a very small market share. Despite this, the media attention over lab-grown meat is considerable and many more start-ups as well as some of the largest food manufactures invest heavily into production. At the same time there are campaigns against the production of lab-grown meat. Towards the end of this period, there are some breakthroughs in creating more complex meat products, such as those resembling prime beef cuts or chicken breast. These will not be available for sale at reasonable prices for a number of years.
 
2025
  • For certain low-quality ground meat products, lab-grown meats can compete on price with traditional meats. Some fast food producers begin to introduce lab-grown meat alternatives into their menus. They also begin to run campaigns boasting of the ethical and environmental benefits of this meat. At this point the number of people unwilling to try cultured meat becomes much smaller, however there is a very vocal minority of people (mainly from the anti-GMO, anti-vaxxer, chemtrail crowd) who become opposed to these meats with spurious claims of its health effects. Similarly, traditional meat producers lobby and run campaigns boasting of the higher quality and greater nutrition of traditional meat.
 
2026-2030
 
  • Low quality ground meat products are now becoming less expensive than their traditional counterparts. The number of traditional vegans/vegetarians plummets as up to 50% of them begin to regularly purchase lab grown meat products. There is a new word to describe this group who only eat lab grown meat from ethically sourced culture cells.There is shock as some fast food manufacturers decide to only stock lab-grown meat. Towards the end of this era many animal protection groups and environmentalists begin to produce campaigns to encourage consumers to only consume lab grown products.
 

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#102
Casey

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What adjustments would you make to it now?

#103
Zaphod

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What adjustments would you make to it now?

 

I'm not sure really. I thought some of the predictions were slightly too optimistic, but I do think the industry has the potential to develop quite rapidly. Scaling production and improving quality always takes longer than one initially envisages. Plus a lot of the old food corporations will probably take a while to transition to a new technology and will likely follow user demand rather than generate the demand themselves. After all, a giant corporation such as McDonalds already has an incredibly efficient pipeline for turning a chicken into a McNugget and to be superseded by what is currently an embryonic technology within a decade seems like a tall order. 



#104
wjfox

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High steaks: Lab-grown meat necessary for future protein demands, expert says
 
Anna McMillan · CBC News · Posted: Oct 24, 2018 9:11 PM MT | Last Updated: October 25
 
You might not normally associate the terms 'humane' and 'environmentally friendly' with meat products, but a growing field of research could change that.
 
Cultured meat, or lab-grown meat, begins with the extraction of a small selection of cells from a live animal. Those cells are taken to a lab where they divide, accumulating into a mass that can be harvested and slapped on a burger bun.
 
The practice doesn't require mass slaughter of animals, or the hefty carbon footprint associated with livestock rearing. 
 
So why isn't the wonder meat available at the supermarket? Bill Aimutis, the director of North Carolina State University's food innovation lab, will explore that question Thursday during a free lecture at the University of Alberta.
 
[...]
 
"Realistically we won't see mass production of this type of cultured meat probably until about the year 2040," he said.
 


#105
Yuli Ban

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"Realistically."

 

When we were realistic about the growth of solar and EVs, we said that we'd have around 50GW of global capacity and 300,000 EVs on the road around the world by 2020.

We're ten times that for both two years ahead of schedule.

 

Inspire the market to make a change, market it well, and we'll see exponential growth. You know how the USA and USSR differed in the development of the internet? The first global computer network emerged thanks to capitalists behaving like cooperative socialists, not socialists behaving like competitive capitalists. Same deal in other arenas like cultured meat. The patents are spread about, people see there's something there that can help the world and improve lives, and progress is seen in multiple avenues so that others can also improve their own techniques.

 

With all of this coming together, I wouldn't be surprised if cultured meat is mainstream by 2030— as is normal, China will lead the charge. China's the reason why we're so far ahead in clean energy adoption in the first place. When food prices increase due to the trade war and more citizens move into the middle class, they'll make a mass movement towards cultured meat and other cultured products. 

 

 

I'm almost intrigued how so many of these predictions keep understating the Chinese engine that drives adoption of new technologies. They assume the USA leads adoption, and since the US has been relatively slow on so many green developments, they think it's only natural that green tech develops slowly as a result. But China's there to ruin their plans


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#106
caltrek

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These are the technology advances that could end animal farming

 

https://www.theverge...politics-policy

 

Introduction:

 

(The Verge) On the very first page of The End of Animal Farming, author Jacy Reese makes it clear that the book is not about why animal farming is bad. There have been plenty of books chronicling the damage caused by factory farms, but his book is about how to solve animal farming itself.

 

Technology will be a big part of the answer, says Reese, an animal rights activist and research director at the Sentience Institute. Scientific advances have already brought us the plant-based Impossible Burger and the first lab-grown burger, but we have a ways to go before we can permanently switch to cultured meat.

 

The Verge spoke to Reese about technological advancements, why companies like Tyson are investing in alternative meat, and why we shouldn’t expect to switch to cultured meat by next year. (See linked article foe interview).


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#107
Sciencerocks

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US paves way to get 'lab meat' on plates
November 17, 2018 by Juliette Michel

 

US authorities on Friday agreed on how to regulate food products cultured from animal cells—paving the way to get so-called "lab meat" on American plates.

The Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration agreed to share regulation of cell-cultured food products, they said in a joint statement, following a public meeting in October.

While technical details have yet to be confirmed, the FDA would oversee the collection and differentiation of cells—when stem cells develop to specialized cells— while USDA would oversee production and labeling of food products.

"This regulatory framework will leverage both the FDA's experience regulating cell-culture technology and living biosystems and the USDA's expertise in regulating livestock and poultry products for human consumption," the statement said, adding that the agencies see no need for legislation on the matter.

 

https://medicalxpres...eat-plates.html



#108
wjfox

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New $100 Million Protein Investment Fund to Focus on Vegan and Clean Meat

 

December 21, 2018

 

A new $100 million investment fund will focus on vegan and clean meat to better cater for the rising number of people on a plant-based diet and to disrupt the meat and dairy industries.

Called the New Protein Fund, the fund will invest in the advanced manufacturing and distribution of products made by companies funded by New Crop Capital, a specialized private venture. According to its website, New Crop sees animal agriculture as an “antiquated and inefficient” system with “serious vulnerabilities” that is set to be upended.

Chris Kerr, chief investment officer of New Crop, is setting up the New Protein Fund with businessman Dan Pathomvanich. Speaking to financial media company Bloomberg, Kerr said that the vegan cause is having a “moment,” with consumers’ dollars speaking for themselves.

“[E]veryone’s paying attention. The dollars are telling the story,” he said. “Alternative proteins” are the fastest-growing sector of the food industry. From 2017 to mid-2018, sales of vegan products in the U.S. increased by 20 percent, Bloomberg highlights.

Kerr’s “big mission” is to leave a global footprint on the food industry. Pushing this vision is a host of innovative brands crafting familiar, well-loved foods out of ingredients that aren’t so familiar in meat and dairy products. Among New Crop’s portfolio is Outstanding Foods, that makes bacon chips out of mushrooms; Beyond Meat, making burgers with pea protein; Fora Foods, using chickpea water to make butter; Miyoko’s Kitchen, that makes cheese with cashews; and Memphis Meat, a startup growing clean meat in a lab.

 

https://www.livekind...gan-clean-meat/


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#109
bgates276

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I'm not sure about Vegan meat, but I've had Vegan burgers, and while it may have been nutritious, I didn't really find them very edible. I would definitely pay more for regular meat. The irony is that Vegan burgers are expensive. If they can somehow alter the taste and texture, and also lower the price, it may be worth considering further. 



#110
Yuli Ban

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Will 2019 be the year of lab-grown meat?

Lists outlining ways in which we can reduce our carbon footprint regularly encourage meatless Mondays or becoming a vegetarian. But these increasingly common lifestyle changes may soon disappear as lab-grown meats come closer to being available commercially.
In December, Israel-based Aleph Farms unveiled the first steak grown in a laboratory.
In producing the thin piece of steak, the company was able to surmount one of the major challenges faced by this young industry: growing a meat product in the lab that integrates both muscle and fat tissue.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#111
caltrek

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Sizzling interest in lab-grown meat belies lack of basic research

 

https://www.nature.c...586-019-00373-w

 

Introduction:

(Nature) Private investment in lab-grown meat is soaring as companies chase the promise of boundless — and delicious — nuggets, steaks and burgers cultured in vitro rather than reared on the hoof. Clean-meat start-ups have raked in tens of millions of dollars in the last two years from billionaires such as Bill Gates and Richard Branson, and the agriculture giants Cargill and Tyson.

 

But funding for academic research on lab-grown meat has lagged behind, and some researchers say that it is sorely needed. Despite the booming commercial interest in developing meat that is eco-friendly and ethically sound, critics argue that the industry lacks much of the scientific and engineering expertise needed to bring lab-grown meat to the masses. And any advances made by commercial firms are often protected as trade secrets.

 

“There are lots of technical hurdles here to overcome,” says Paul Mozdziak, a muscle biologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh who studies lab-grown chicken and turkey. The challenges include developing better cell lines and nutrient media to feed those cells, along with scaffolding materials to help shape cultured cells into tissue, and bioreactor platforms for large-scale meat production.

 

Open-source research in the field got a boost on 6 February, when the Good Food Institute (GFI) — a think-tank in Washington DC that promotes alternatives to conventional meat — announced the winners of its inaugural grant programme. The group will split US$3 million among 14 projects — 6 working to develop lab-grown meat and 8 focusing on plant-based proteins. Each team will receive up to $250,000 over two years.

 

“It does seem like the largest contribution that I can think of toward cellular agriculture research,” says Kate Krueger, the research director of New Harvest, a non-profit organization in New York City that has contributed almost $1 million in the past decade to academics working on clean-meat research.

d41586-019-00373-w_16443610.jpg

Culturing beef, pork and other meats in the lab is a technical challenge.

Credit: Phong Pham/Alamy


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#112
wjfox

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*rolls eyes*

 

-----

 

Cultured lab meat may make climate change worse

 

Growing meat in the laboratory may do more damage to the climate in the long run than meat from cattle, say scientists.
 
Researchers are looking for alternatives to traditional meat because farming animals is helping to drive up global temperatures.
 
However, meat grown in the lab may make matters worse in some circumstances.
 
Researchers say it depends on how the energy to make the lab meat is produced.
 

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#113
Yuli Ban

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Reddit discussion:
Would you eat/support lab-grown meat? If so/if not, why?


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#114
Yuli Ban

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Lab-grown meat: Taste testing chicken of the future

Chicken nuggets usually get a pretty bad rap. Whether they're filled with mystery meat or come with a mouthful of additives, they also involve slaughtering an animal. But the nugget I'm about to eat from San Francisco-based Just was grown in a lab, using cells taken from a living chicken. It's cultured meat (and cruelty-free).
Carnivores, breathe a sigh of relief. 
Unlike entirely plant-based products such as the Impossible Burger, the Just chicken nugget is actual meat.
Cultured meat, also called lab-grown or clean meat, starts with the collection of cells, usually done through a biopsy so the animals aren't harmed. Just says it has also been able to get cells from a chicken feather. The most viable cells are chosen and then given the right nutrients they need to grow in a bioreactor. In the case of this chicken nugget, those nutrients are plant-based.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#115
Yuli Ban

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Fake meat is 'no laughing matter': Plant-based protein will be worth $85-billion by 2030

The market for plant-based protein is set to surge over the next decade as part of an agricultural revolution in technology, according to UBS Group AG.
“Mock meat was an almost comical fad 20 years ago,” Wayne Gordon, senior Asia-Pacific strategist at UBS Global Wealth Management, said in a 67-page report. “It’s no laughing matter today, given the industry’s meteoric rise in recent years.”
Beyond Meat Inc., the vegan burger maker, emerged as this year’s darling in the IPO market with shares surpassing US$200 last month compared with a US$25 offering price. UBS predicts the plant-protein market will swell to US$85 billion by 2030 from US$4.6 billion now, with the broad market for agriculture technology set to reach US$700 billion from US$135 billion.


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#116
kjaggard

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a few things to consider:

there is a low incidence of allergies to meat, but plant based meat alternatives often are made with soy, gluten or legumes... 3 of the highest immune reactions to foods.

 

the macro and micro nutrient values for plant based foods are drastically different than for meat. You body actually needs many of the fats, and proteins specifically from meat, fish and eggs to get an preferred balance. trying to get similar spread through vegetables tubers and grains results in over consumption of foods that drastically disrupt metabolism and have many of their own problems.

 

lab grown meat may be a great option for mitigating some of those issues, but I feel like an area of higher value to look for lab meats would be things like fish and other sea food. The nutritional value of fish is some of the best, and with lab grown you can eliminate some of the mercury and plastic contamination in dietary fish, while also stepping back over fishing and allow the fish populations to recover.

 

past that, if we could lab grow eggs, or at the very least lab grown egg white, that could provide a lot of food coverage without some of the difficulty of muscle fiber and the processes involved there.

 

and then if we could do lab produced dairy, especially if we could control lactose, we could supply a lot of options.

 

Imagine a world of lab grown milk, cheese, yoghurt, eggs, shrimp, scallops, lobster, clams and fish. With that sort of menu, being able to add insect based foods, and lab grown meats we could greatly reduce the environmental impact of food production and just as importantly make it viable to produce important food need and nutritional value in remote areas and even off world.


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Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.





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