Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

History of Computers & Internet

Babbage Internet 1950s 1800s Antikythera Mechanism computing analog computing Alan Turing 1990s computers

  • Please log in to reply
146 replies to this topic

#141
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#142
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA


Radio_Free_Galactica

In which on December 9, 1968, Douglas Engelbart (inventor of the mouse-interface) demonstrated several key elements of the modern Internet and World Wide Webb, including hyper-text-links, visual-chat-videoconferencing over a world-wide distance spanning network, and even a Windows/Macintosh-style operating system environment!


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#143
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

TIL that the first first-person shooter, Maze, was created in 1973. It included features like corner peeking, AI bots, and 8-player online play. In fact, it was so popular that DARPA had to ban it from ARPANET because half of all network activity for a month was between players at MIT and Stanford.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#144
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

TIL that the first computer game was Nim, released in April 1940 on a computer called the Nimatron, which weighed over a ton. The designer was a nuclear physicist and quantum mechanics pioneer who later participated in the Manhattan Project. 100,000 games were played, with the computer winning ~90%


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#145
Erowind

Erowind

    Anarchist without an adjective

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,562 posts

There's an amazing Ahoy documentary on this



#146
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#147
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,490 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA


There's an amazing Ahoy documentary on this

I loved watching that video because it expanded on all these points I myself made back in 2017:

Let's talk about old-school video games!
 
No, no, put away your Atari 2600 and NES. We're going even older. No, keep the Magnavox Odyssey. 
 
I'm talking about video games from the 1940s and '50s!
 
To start, let's talk about the Cathode Ray Tube Amusement Device. This is the very first game that could even be described as a "video game" in any way, shape, or form. In essence, it's more like a proto-video game— a game played purely in a realm beyond the physical world. Date of creation: 1947. Yes, it was created 70 years ago. You can certainly tell. It looks exactly like what you'd expect from a video game made in the 1940s. It's so old that it's connected to an oscilloscope.
 
Here's one that sounds so Space Age: Bertie the Brain. A tic-tac-toe machine from 1950.
 

O.X.O.
No, that's not me acting like a scene girl. That's the name of another tic-tac-toe simulator from 1952. It's actually the first digital video game ever, one which also possesses artificial intelligence. And remember, artificial intelligence as a term and field wasn't even created until 1955, so these two games essentially act as both proto-video games and proto-AI.
 
A bit before O.X.O., there was Nimrod (no doubt considered an awesome name before Bugs Bunny turned it into another word for 'idiot'). This one was in 1951 and involves a game of Nim... which I've never heard of before now, so TIL.
 
Finally, there's the most famous of the lot.
Tennis For Two, from 1958.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2E9iSQfGdg
This is basically Pong's daddy. Half-literally at that, since it predates Pong by 14 years. Unlike the previous games, it's also the first game to be developed as an actual game rather than be a byproduct of early computer research. When Tennis For Two was being designed, it was designed as a game in mind. Thus, while it's not the first computer game, it is the first true video game. 
 
So fuck you, Tennis For Two. You ruined my life.
/s
 
We complain about the latest Assassin's Creed and FIFA games or how Ubisoft and EA are existential failures of being, and yet 60+ years ago the idea that you could manually control a little bit of light on a screen blew people's minds.

 

Though he came to a different conclusion about either OXO or Tennis for Two being the first video game (spoiler: it's not). I can accept that.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Babbage, Internet, 1950s, 1800s, Antikythera Mechanism, computing, analog computing, Alan Turing, 1990s, computers

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users