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Monoatomic metal glass has been created

Materials Metal Glass

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#1
Ru1138

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http://phys.org/news...etal-glass.html

 

Materials scientists have long sought to form glass from pure, monoatomic metals. Scott X. Mao and colleagues did it.

 

Their paper, "Formation of Monoatomic Metallic Glasses Through Ultrafast Liquid Quenching," was recently published online in Nature, a leading science journal.

 

Mao, William, Kepler Whiteford Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Pittsburgh, says, "This is a fundamental issue explored by people in this field for a long time, but nobody could solve the problem. People believed that it could be done, and now we're able to show that it is possible."

 

 

 


What difference does it make?


#2
That-Guy

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Now all we need now are some applications, any ideas?



#3
Ru1138

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Now all we need now are some applications, any ideas?

 
There are already plenty of potential applications. Metallic glasses (also known as amorphous metals) already exist, but monoatomic ones are new.
 
Per Wikipedia:

Currently the most important application is due to the special magnetic properties of some ferromagnetic metallic glasses. The low magnetization loss is used in high efficiency transformers (amorphous metal transformer) at line frequency and some higher frequency transformers. Amorphous steel is a very brittle material which makes it difficult to punch into motor laminations. Also electronic article surveillance (such as theft control passive ID tags,) often uses metallic glasses because of these magnetic properties.
 
Amorphous metals (metallic glasses) exhibit unique softening behavior above their glass transition and this softening has been increasingly explored for thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses. It has been shown that metallic glasses can be patterned on extremely small length scales ranging from 10 nm to several millimeters. It has been suggested that this may solve the problems of nanoimprint lithography where expensive nano-molds made of silicon break easily. Nano-molds made from metallic glasses are easy to fabricate and more durable than silicon molds. Such low softening temperature allows for developing simple methods for making composites of nanoparticles (e.g. carbon nanotubes) and BMGs. The superior electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of BMGs compared to polymers make them a good option for developing nanocomposites for electronic application such as field electron emission devices.
 
Ti40Cu36Pd14Zr10 is believed to be noncarcinogenic, is about three times stronger than titanium, and its elastic modulus nearly matches bones. It has a high wear resistance and does not produce abrasion powder. The alloy does not undergo shrinkage on solidification. A surface structure can be generated that is biologically attachable by surface modification using laser pulses, allowing better joining with bone.
 
Mg60Zn35Ca5, rapidly cooled to achieve amorphous structure, is being investigated as a biomaterial for implantation into bones as screws, pins, or plates, to fix fractures. Unlike traditional steel or titanium, this material dissolves in organisms at a rate of roughly 1 millimeter per month and is replaced with bone tissue. This speed can be adjusted by varying the content of zinc.


Here's something from Fifty Degrees Below by Kim Stanley Robinson:
 

...making the resulting "glassy steel" stronger, nonmagnetic, and less corrosive. The Navy was interested in making ship hulls of this stuff... all kinds of ocean-proofed machinery could perhaps be improved, enough so that practical methods of tapping into the ocean's energy might be built.

What difference does it make?


#4
Ghostreaper

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A two way mirror hulled spaceship :D


“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#5
TheAsianGuy_LOL

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A two way mirror hulled spaceship :D

That acts as a better solar sail :). This is actually a nice find. Hope it will have new widespread applications.


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