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Humanity in the year 2587.


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#21
KaRdAsHeV~sCaLe

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Travelling to stars more than 20 l.y. away, around 99.99999999999999999% speed of light. Venus starts to be terraformed. Earthquakes and such natural disasters are non-existent. Dozens of millions of people on the Moon and tens of millions on Mars. Living on Titan maybe. Flying cars that can travel in space. Huge spaceships. 80% of us are 100% non-biological, to name but a few.

Counting down the days until 2050: 12,499 Humanity = 0.72 on the Kardashev scale
Counting down the days until 2100: 30,761
Counting down the days until 3000: 359,479


#22
Kabe Ayofe

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Wow, 2582. 

 

Historically speaking, most depictions of the future end up being wildly off, as we base our ideas of trends that we think may or may not continue i.e.  in the 80s thinking that we would go from human-driven cars to flying cars, instead of driverless cars. Thus I think its highly probably our predictions for the next 56.8 years will probably be wrong, let alone the next 568 haha. 

 

But not to be Buzz Killington, I'd speculate being that far into the future would see us having a presence on every planet in our solar system. I actually expect Pluto to be colonised in the 2200s as I see China and India greatly catalysing the space industry, along with private companies, SpaceX, Blue Origin and the like. Unfortunately I do see an Elysium like situation occurring within the next 200 years, unless we solve the population problem. Professor Adrian Rafferty and the UN predict that the population to hit 11 billion by 2100. Barring a huge boom in production, I don't think we can sustain that many people. If in vitro meat/vertical farming doesnt work, food prices go up and  there will be chaos. I can then see an exodus of the wealthy to Mars and beyond. 

 

If your interested in human colonisation of the galaxy, give this a read. I found it really thought provoking. 

http://www.open.edu/...nise-the-galaxy



#23
Raklian

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It's almost absolutely certain that a very small asteroid mining company in 26th century will utilize a greater amount of energy than the entire global economy today.


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#24
JCO

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Travelling to stars more than 20 l.y. away, around 99.99999999999999999% speed of light. Venus starts to be terraformed. Earthquakes and such natural disasters are non-existent. Dozens of millions of people on the Moon and tens of millions on Mars. Living on Titan maybe. Flying cars that can travel in space. Huge spaceships. 80% of us are 100% non-biological, to name but a few.

 

If in the next 500 years we do not create FTL travel I do not think we will have direct contact with any but the very closest stars. We may migrate from star to star but the people around those stars will be little more than legend to those living around Sol. I do not think Venus will prove worth terraforming. Infact I think a minority of the human race will live at the bottom of gravity wells. Though Earth's climate and weather are likely to be much more managed I do not think tectonics will be something we have as great a control. By that time we may be able to trigger small quakes to prevent large ones and predict and modify volcanic eruptions to minimize damage and loss of life. I think scale of to overall system will still be beyond our control. It is likely however we will mine much deeper into the Earth's crust and even in some cases the mantel. This may result in discovery of new forms of matter with properties that spur whole new technologies.

 

The human population will continue to grow but the growth will likely slow in the next hundred years it will pick up again as colonies in orbit and beyond begin to grow rapidly. The Earth's own population will begin to fall not long after as living off Earth represents more wealth, opportunity and freedom. In about 300 years more humans will live in 'space' than on Earth. By 2587 it is likely the population of Earth will be less than a Billion and humanity as a whole will number over 20 Billion. The greatest portion of that population will live in large self-contained environments located between the orbit of Venus and Mars. Many will at or near Earth and Mars but many other will not. The next largest group will be on Earth, the Moon and Mars. Most of the rest will be living in the asteroid belt and the outer solar system. Few will live near or inside the orbit of Venus as their are few accessible resources available.

 

It is likely that even without FTL some type of colonies will have been established on a near by star but it will be some time before this grows to rival Sol system. If even FTL communication is developed this could significantly expand extrasolar colonization.


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#25
Jakob

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It's almost absolutely certain that a very small asteroid mining company in 26th century will utilize a greater amount of energy than the entire global economy today.

Maybe a very large one, but certainly not a very small one.



#26
Raklian

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Remember that gigantic Romulan mining vessel that time travelled to the 23rd century from 129 years in the future and that it took the entire Federation to take it down? :)

 

That Romulan vessel wasn't even a warship, just a simple, small mining vessel (according to 24th century standards) whose captain was overcome with grief and then hell-bent on destroying the Federation.

 

That's only 129 years apart. We're now talking 5 centuries, and I can assure you we will invent new forms of energy generation that will boggle our present minds. And... there will be several iterations of these through those 5 centuries, each one out-awing the previous one.


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#27
Jakob

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But surely the asteroid belt would be used up in a matter of weeks at that rate.



#28
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I didn't say the small mining company was within the solar system. A small mining operation in the 26th century could span 100 star systems. :)


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#29
Ru1138

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I didn't say the small mining company was within the solar system. A small mining operation in the 26th century could span 100 star systems. :)

 

Thing is: I don't think we'll spread that quickly. When you run into a chunk of dark matter at high enough speed you'd probably end up destroying the ship in a GRB like burst of energy. So we'll probably be limited to 50% of the speed of light, and there's no guarantee that we'll hit that maximum by 2587.

 

That said, I could be wrong.


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#30
Jakob

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I didn't say the small mining company was within the solar system. A small mining operation in the 26th century could span 100 star systems. :)

Not by the 2600s. Let's say that interstellar travel begins in 2200 (it happens a few decades later than that in my fictional timeline of the future, but it's a bit on the pessimistic side). If we assume an average of one third the speed of light (maybe 2500s spacecraft will be faster, but the first interstellar craft will certainly be slower). From a look at a Wikipedia navbox, I guess that there are maybe a thousand star systems in that radius. A lot of them (maybe a couple hundred) are brown dwarfs that are not worth visiting, and it's likely that plenty more don't have large asteroid belts like our own Solar System. So, a mining operation on 100 star systems would be operating in 15-25+ percent of all economically viable star systems. That would be a massive operation, not a small one.


Edited by Jakob, 13 September 2014 - 09:25 PM.


#31
LastPersonYouWantToMeet

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Wow, 2582

 

Historically speaking, most depictions of the future end up being wildly off, as we base our ideas of trends that we think may or may not continue i.e.  in the 80s thinking that we would go from human-driven cars to flying cars, instead of driverless cars. Thus I think its highly probably our predictions for the next 56.8 years will probably be wrong, let alone the next 568 haha. 

 

But not to be Buzz Killington, I'd speculate being that far into the future would see us having a presence on every planet in our solar system. I actually expect Pluto to be colonised in the 2200s as I see China and India greatly catalysing the space industry, along with private companies, SpaceX, Blue Origin and the like. Unfortunately I do see an Elysium like situation occurring within the next 200 years, unless we solve the population problem. Professor Adrian Rafferty and the UN predict that the population to hit 11 billion by 2100. Barring a huge boom in production, I don't think we can sustain that many people. If in vitro meat/vertical farming doesnt work, food prices go up and  there will be chaos. I can then see an exodus of the wealthy to Mars and beyond. 

 

If your interested in human colonisation of the galaxy, give this a read. I found it really thought provoking. 

http://www.open.edu/...nise-the-galaxy

I said 2587.



#32
Raklian

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I'm assuming we've already mastered the mechanics of the warp drive.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#33
LastPersonYouWantToMeet

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I didn't say the small mining company was within the solar system. A small mining operation in the 26th century could span 100 star systems. :)

Not by the 2600s. Let's say that interstellar travel begins in 2200 (it happens a few decades later than that in my fictional timeline of the future, but it's a bit on the pessimistic side). If we assume an average of one third the speed of light (maybe 2500s spacecraft will be faster, but the first interstellar craft will certainly be slower). From a look at a Wikipedia navbox, I guess that there are maybe a thousand star systems in that radius. A lot of them (maybe a couple hundred) are brown dwarfs that are not worth visiting, and it's likely that plenty more don't have large asteroid belts like our own Solar System. So, a mining operation on 100 star systems would be operating in 15-25+ percent of all economically viable star systems. That would be a massive operation, not a small one.

 

The official timeline says by 2150 we'll have interstellar travel, so we have some extra time to advance it.



#34
Jakob

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I didn't say the small mining company was within the solar system. A small mining operation in the 26th century could span 100 star systems. :)

Not by the 2600s. Let's say that interstellar travel begins in 2200 (it happens a few decades later than that in my fictional timeline of the future, but it's a bit on the pessimistic side). If we assume an average of one third the speed of light (maybe 2500s spacecraft will be faster, but the first interstellar craft will certainly be slower). From a look at a Wikipedia navbox, I guess that there are maybe a thousand star systems in that radius. A lot of them (maybe a couple hundred) are brown dwarfs that are not worth visiting, and it's likely that plenty more don't have large asteroid belts like our own Solar System. So, a mining operation on 100 star systems would be operating in 15-25+ percent of all economically viable star systems. That would be a massive operation, not a small one.

 

The official timeline says by 2150 we'll have interstellar travel, so we have some extra time to advance it.

 

Okay, so 120ish light years. That doesn't change the basic idea I'm getting at.

 

I'm assuming we've already mastered the mechanics of the warp drive.

Ah, yes. Warp drives. One of those technologies that radically changes everything when thrown into a discussion about the future. I'm personally skeptical about warp drives even existing by then, but who knows?

 

Also, 100 star systems means that a small company would just run out of asteroids in a few years instead of a few weeks. To say nothing of the mega-corporations that are orders of magnitudes larger.



#35
Maximus

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Go looking for the "After Man" videos on YouTube. If man were to vanish tomorrow, in 100 years it would be difficult to find most of human structures. In 500 years most cities would need to be excavated to know they were ever there. In 100 thousand years you would not be able to tell humanity existed by studying the distribution or diversity of species. Most of our effects on the Earth are important only in how they impact us. To nature we are an insignificant irritation that will learn to behave itself or evolution will choose against it.

 

 

True, most of what humanity has made will collapse and be submerged beneath meters of dirt or sand if we were to die out. I'm wondering if any of our satellites would remain in orbit and for how long? Wouldn't their orbits eventually degrade causing them to fall back to earth? Even so, there will be remnants of us left: the landing stages, footprints, and flags from the Apollo missions will be there for a very long time unless they get blasted by a giant meteor. This page I read said that traces of the Apollo missions will take 10-100 million years to completely fade. So barring a meteor strike, there will be some trace of us for a decent amount of time. And even then, we have the Voyager missions out in deep space: who knows how long they might last. Maybe a billion years from now, one of them will crash land on a civilized world and the universe will know of our existence.



#36
four

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Here are a few options. Not sure which is most likely:

> The Singularity occurs. The dominant form of intelligence is AI with morals derivative of but different to human ones; Earth is either kept in its natural condition, or converted into a huge computer running many simulations.
> The Singularity occurs. Superintelligent AIs discover how to bypass the physical dimensions of this universe. Concepts such as time become irrelevant.
> We fail to produce self-improving intelligence, nevertheless, we succeed in creating more advanced technology and expanding into space. Stereotypical sci-fi.
> Humanity causes its own extinction or near-extinction, with powerful weapons such as nuclear and biological getting into the wrong hands.

I hope the last scenario doesn't occur.
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#37
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I hope the last scenario doesn't occur.

Who would hope for it?



#38
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I hope the last scenario doesn't occur.

Who would hope for it?

 

 

Frizz, apparently. 



#39
Jakob

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I hope the last scenario doesn't occur.

Who would hope for it?

 

 

Frizz, apparently. 

 

I kind of doubt that he's serious.



#40
four

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I kind of doubt that he's serious.


Sadly, it's more likely than you might think.
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