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An alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures

Materials Metals Metal

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#1
Ru1138

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http://phys.org/news...-cryogenic.html

 

A new concept in metallic alloy design – called "high-entropy alloys" - has yielded a multiple-element material that not only tests out as one of the toughest on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures. This multi-element alloy was synthesized and tested through a collaboration of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley and Oak Ridge National Laboratories.

 

"We examined CrMnFeCoNi, a high-entropy alloy that contains five major elements rather than one dominant one," says Robert Ritchie, a materials scientist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division. "Our tests showed that despite containing multiple elements with different crystal structures, this alloy crystalizes as a single phase, face‐centered cubic solid with exceptional damage tolerance, tensile strength above one gigapascal, and fracture toughness values that are off the charts, exceeding that of virtually all other metallic alloys."


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#2
Raklian

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Potential metal alloy for outer sheath of our future interstellar starships?


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#3
Jakob

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As suspect that even tougher alloys may already exist. Remember, it's not cold per se in space, since cold requires slow-moving particles and there are next-to-no particles in space. Thus, strength at cryogenic temperatures isn't a requirement.

 

Could be very useful for building tools out of in an outer Solar System colony though.



#4
Ru1138

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As suspect that even tougher alloys may already exist. Remember, it's not cold per se in space, since cold requires slow-moving particles and there are next-to-no particles in space. Thus, strength at cryogenic temperatures isn't a requirement.

 

Could be very useful for building tools out of in an outer Solar System colony though.

 

There is radiative cooling, though that's very slow.


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#5
Jakob

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As suspect that even tougher alloys may already exist. Remember, it's not cold per se in space, since cold requires slow-moving particles and there are next-to-no particles in space. Thus, strength at cryogenic temperatures isn't a requirement.

 

Could be very useful for building tools out of in an outer Solar System colony though.

 

There is radiative cooling, though that's very slow.

 

Admittedly, that could be a problem on interstellar trips. Not so much on interplanetary ones though.







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