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Carbon Nano Tube Production From Coal Byproducts

nano tube production coal byproducts carbon

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#1
Spacekitty

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Hey Everyone, I just read the latest updates, and frankly, I see a terrible waste of carbon.

 

If you haven't read it already its about this group who are about to retrofit a coal power plant in america somewhere to capture carbon dioxide and store it in natural and safe formations underground. While this is projected to reduce emissions of the plant by 90% and capture 1.1 million tons of CO2 per year, it does seem like a waste of such a powerful molecule.

 

As most of us know, CO2 is a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming and the problems we may face in the future regarding flooding in all of our main population hubs. However, it can also be really useful. CO2 can be split into its composing atoms so what we are left with is pure carbon which can be used to create all sorts of materials critical to many of the constructions of the future, namely carbon nano tubes. So instead of storing the stuff underground where seismic activity could unleash huge amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere at one time, I pose to the community these questions

 

1. Couldn't we instead use the CO2 to create carbon nano tubes or other useful materials?

2. Would this have any possible environmental ramifications?

3. When will people realise that they cant rely on a finite resource like coal?

4. Would carbon from these power plants become something that the economy would eventually, like most things, rely on?


I will instigate the singularity!


#2
TheAsianGuy_LOL

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Hey Everyone, I just read the latest updates, and frankly, I see a terrible waste of carbon.

 

If you haven't read it already its about this group who are about to retrofit a coal power plant in america somewhere to capture carbon dioxide and store it in natural and safe formations underground. While this is projected to reduce emissions of the plant by 90% and capture 1.1 million tons of CO2 per year, it does seem like a waste of such a powerful molecule.

 

As most of us know, CO2 is a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming and the problems we may face in the future regarding flooding in all of our main population hubs. However, it can also be really useful. CO2 can be split into its composing atoms so what we are left with is pure carbon which can be used to create all sorts of materials critical to many of the constructions of the future, namely carbon nano tubes. So instead of storing the stuff underground where seismic activity could unleash huge amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere at one time, I pose to the community these questions

 

1. Couldn't we instead use the CO2 to create carbon nano tubes or other useful materials?

2. Would this have any possible environmental ramifications?

3. When will people realise that they cant rely on a finite resource like coal?

4. Would carbon from these power plants become something that the economy would eventually, like most things, rely on?

1. Of course, but will it be efficient enough to recycle them? That's why most research on it is pretty slim.

2. No, you're not like releasing it in the air, you're using to create other items which can be recycled again due to being comprised mostly of carbon and continue on so forth.

3. Haven't people thought so already? Lol.

4. Well I wouldn't exactly say rely on for economic purposes, but it sure does help a lot of industries.


"We know Everything, but not Everything"~ Me

"Don't question what I know, question what I don't know."~ Me

"Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will"~Italian UFO


#3
Mike the average

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Last week i sold stock in Fuelcell (hydrogen) who also announced they are making fuel cells from capturing carbon from coal plants?

is this the same group?
'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#4
Spacekitty

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Last week i sold stock in Fuelcell (hydrogen) who also announced they are making fuel cells from capturing carbon from coal plants?

is this the same group?

 

No its a different group. Look for the article in latest updates


I will instigate the singularity!


#5
JCO

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1. I have had a similar thought about using the CO2 from sources to create CNT or graphene. I think the current bottleneck to this is that there are not currently industrial scale methods and demand for the materials.

2. The process of producing the end product may produce some type of toxic waste. 

3. There will always be some things in limited supply. The real problem with coal is that there is a large supply of it. It is often used because it is the cheapest way to produce power.

4. I doubt this process will be the most efficient method to collect CO2 for making the materials. I think there will be better ways to convert coal into CNT or graphene than to have it boil water first.


Confirmed Agnostic - I know that I don't know for sure and I am almost certain no one else does either.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nano, tube, production, coal, byproducts, carbon

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