Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1557
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

5,000 burgers a day: World’s first cultured meat-production plant opens in Israel
The world’s first industrial cultured meat facility has opened in the city of Rehovot, home to the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Agriculture, Israeli slaughter-free meat-production startup Future Meat Technologies announced on Wednesday.

With the capability to produce 500 kilograms (1,102 pounds) of cultured products a day, equivalent to 5,000 hamburgers, this facility makes scalable cell-based meat production a reality.

“This facility opening marks a huge step in Future Meat Technologies’ path to market, serving as a critical enabler to bring our products to shelves by 2022,” said Rom Kshuk, CEO of Future Meat Technologies. “Having a running industrial line accelerates key processes such as regulation and product development.”

Currently, the facility can produce cultured chicken, pork and lamb, without the use of animal serum or genetic modification, with the production of beef coming soon. The company claims its unique platform enables fast production cycles—about 20 times faster than traditional animal agriculture.
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1557
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1557
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

S.F. is getting the world's first 'cultured sushi' tasting room, where fish is grown in a lab
A first-of-its-kind sushi bar serving cultured salmon is gearing up to open in Dogpatch this fall — but it will be a while before paying customers can sample any of the fish.

The project is the brainchild of the S.F startup Wildtype, which has been working since 2016 to produce cultured salmon, or salmon grown in a lab. Like other alternative meat companies, Wildtype hopes it can eventually produce enough fish to be sold at grocery stores and to be served in dishes at Bay Area restaurants.

Founders Aryé Elfenbein and Justin Kolbeck, who announced plans for the new Dogpatch tasting room in April and more recently slated a tentative debut this September, said the sushi bar isn’t a restaurant. Instead, it’s more like an interactive museum where visitors get a window into how the fish is made, literally. The tasting room will have a glass barrier allowing diners to peer into the production facility where the salmon is grown in stainless steel tanks, similar to what visitors might find in a brewery.
Image
A first-of-its-kind sushi bar dedicated to serving lab-grown salmon is gearing up to open in S.F.’s Dogpatch neighborhood.
Wildtype
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1557
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

New Cultured Meat Factory in Israel Will Churn Out 5,000 Bioreactor Burgers a Day
In August 2013, food critics in London sampled the world’s first lab-grown hamburger. Opinions on taste and texture varied, but most agreed it wasn’t all that different than meat from an animal. At the time, the cultured meat’s taste and texture didn’t seem like too big of a concern, because the cost of making the burger—a cool $330,000—meant this technology was years away from reaching the average consumer.

Now, eight years later, an Israeli company called Future Meat Technologies has opened the world’s first facility to produce lab-grown meat at scale, in an inland city south of Tel Aviv called Rehovot. While the company hasn’t released an estimate of per-burger cost, it says the facility will be able to produce 500 kilograms of meat per day, which translates to about 5,000 burger patties.
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
caltrek
Posts: 645
Joined: Mon May 17, 2021 1:17 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by caltrek »

Is Lab Meat About to Hit Your Dinner Plate?
by Tom Philpott
August 2, 2021

https://www.motherjones.com/food/2021/0 ... ner-plate/

Introduction:
(Mother Jones) For at least a century, people have dreamed of being able to dine on plentiful meat without having to worry about the labor exploitation, environmental destruction, and animal cruelty that go along with it. In 1932, Winston Churchill predicted that within 50 years, “we shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium.” He added, “The new foods will be practically indistinguishable from the natural products from the outset, and any changes will be so gradual as to escape observation.”

Churchill’s timeline didn’t pan out, but recent announcements from the burgeoning cell-cultured meat industry suggest that his vision has finally reached fruition, or at least come so close you can taste it—as long as you live in or can get yourself to Singapore. There, diners can order “dishes featuring high-quality [lab-grown] chicken made in a brand-new way” delivered to their door, according to an April 19 press release from Eat Just, a San Francisco alt-protein titan. Or, as a follow-up announcement on May 18 revealed, Singaporeans can head to Madame Fan, a fancy hotel restaurant, for the Thursday special: meals centered on “real meat without slaughter.” These product launches became possible when, in December 2020, Singapore became the first nation to approve cell-meat products for sale.

It likely won’t be the last. In December, Israel’s then–Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu became the first head of state to publicly taste animal flesh grown in a vat instead of in the body of an animal.
Conclusion:
Next time you read an article hailing the imminent disruption of Big Ag by tech startups promising slaughter-free burgers or chicken nuggets, be sure to dig into the details. It’s unlikely that the solution to the problems generated by industrial-scale meat production will come from a bioreactor pulsing with cells gleaned from a chicken, cow, or pig. At least, not anytime soon
caltrek
Posts: 645
Joined: Mon May 17, 2021 1:17 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by caltrek »

^^^The Mother Jones article I cited above is skeptical about cultured beef and poultry. However, overlooked is seafood. The Axios article below indicates more progress om that front, as do articles cited by others earlier in this thread.

Your Future Sushi Dinner Could be Cultivated, Not Caught
by Bryan Walsh
August 4, 2021

https://www.axios.com/wild-type-lab-gro ... fb0fa.html

Introduction:
(Axios) Startups are getting close to being able to sell cultivated seafood products that have been grown from fish cells in a lab-like facility, rather than caught in the wild or farmed.

Why it matters: Developing cultivated animal protein that could compete with conventional products is a promising way for people to eat what they want without killing animals or damaging the planet.
  • But cultivated seafood could also help alleviate the conservation pressure on wild fish caused by overfishing.
What's happening: Last week I had the chance to try a few pieces of cultivated salmon sashimi and sushi from the startup Wild Type, which says it is close to being able to commercially produce salmon grown from fish cells in its San Francisco facility.
  • The verdict: I give it a solid B+ — not at the level of the best sushi I've ever had (that would be Sushi no Midori in Tokyo; high recommend, especially if you have a corporate expense account) — but much better than your average weekday takeout restaurant.
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1557
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

Blood, brains and burgers: The future is lab-grown everything
Science fiction has long floated the idea of a device that can produce any kind of object one can imagine. Star Trek called it a replicator, while other writers have referred to it as a Santa Claus Machine.

We may be centuries away from a single machine that can conjure up whatever we demand at a moment’s notice, but we are not far off creating a variety of things we desire in laboratory conditions. We currently rear animals for meat and dairy, cut down forests for wood, harvest organs from the deceased and mine the earth for diamonds.

But what if all these things, and more, could be grown in a lab?
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
wjfox
Site Admin
Posts: 1374
Joined: Sat May 15, 2021 6:09 pm
Location: Plague Island
Contact:

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by wjfox »

There are now lab-grown mouse-meat cookies for cats

08-16-21

If you want to try some, cultured meat still isn’t easy to find: So far, only one form of cultured chicken has regulatory approval, and only in Singapore. But more is coming, and your pets won’t have to wait long either. Soon there will be cultured meat for pet food, which could help cut the 64 million tons of carbon pollution that comes from producing meat for dog and cat food.

The biotech startup Because, Animals is the first to focus on pet food, and hopes to launch its first products—including a “mouse cookie” snack for cats—by 2022. “The ultimate goal of most cultured meat companies is to create a product that will allow animals to be taken out of the food supply chain,” Shannon Falconer, CEO and cofounder of Because, Animals, said in an email. “And, given that humans are the largest consumers of traditional meat, it makes sense to focus on humans when making a cultured meat product. However, something that most people are unaware of is that, in addition to humans, there is another hugely significant population driving the animal agriculture industry forward: our pets.”

https://www.fastcompany.com/90665457/th ... s-for-cats


Image
"Take it easy, nothing matters in the end."
– William Shatner
caltrek
Posts: 645
Joined: Mon May 17, 2021 1:17 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by caltrek »

Want People to Eat Less Meat? Fake Burgers Probably Won’t Cut It.
by Charlie Mitchell
August 16, 2021

https://www.motherjones.com/food/2021/0 ... nt-cut-it/

Extract:
(Mother Jones) Fake meats currently make up less than half a percent of the meat sector, but that’s quickly changing. Impossible Foods recently expanded to 17,000 US grocery stores and dropped its prices. A new report from investors Blue Horizon Corporation and Boston Consulting Group projected that the “alternative protein” sector could capture between 11 and 22 percent of global meat-eating by 2035….

Fake meat might be doing just as much to lure vegetarians away from staples as it is luring meat-eaters away from sausage.

…This is a fear that some food scholars have long had about meat substitutes: that fake burgers reinforce people’s belief that meat must be at the center of every meal. Richard York, an environmental sociologist at the University of Oregon, points out that this obsession is “an American production.” For millennia, cuisines on entire continents have supported thriving cultures with a fraction of the roughly 223 pounds of meat per person annually that Americans eat.

But the rest of the world is adopting our habits; global meat consumption is set to expand by 12 percent by 2029. Giving people meatlike alternatives doesn’t guarantee that meat will lose popularity, York says….in a study of meat-eating trends between 1961 and 2013, York found that when chicken and seafood became more available than other meats, Americans didn’t eat less beef and pork per capita—they just ate more meat overall. He expects faux meats will have a similar, modest effect. “If Americans consume 10 million Impossible burgers next year, I don’t think beef burger consumption will decline by 10 million,” he says. “It may decline a little bit.”

To counter the outsize damage meat exacts on the planet, we instead need to focus on the economics that have allowed the meat industry to prosper. Marion Nestle, professor emerita at New York University, agrees that fake burgers are a limited solution. “If we really want to help people cut down on the amount of meat they are eating, we need to stop subsidizing cattle feed, stop giving tax breaks to cattle ranchers, require feedlot owners to pay the costs of cleaning up the mess they make, and issue dietary guidelines with clear ‘eat less meat’ messages,” Nestle told me...”policy is what matters.”
User avatar
funkervogt
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon May 17, 2021 3:03 pm

Re: Cultured & Alternative Foods News and Discussions

Post by funkervogt »

A negative analysis of cultured meat's future prospects.
Capital- and operating-cost analyses of conceptual cell-mass production facilities indicate production economics that would likely preclude the affordability of their products as food. The analysis concludes that metabolic efficiency enhancements and the development of low-cost media from plant hydrolysates are both necessary but insufficient conditions for the measurable displacement of conventional meat by cultured meat.
https://engrxiv.org/795su
Post Reply