Home & Leisure News and Discussions

weatheriscool
Posts: 1385
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 6:16 pm

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by weatheriscool »

Nanotech OLED electrode liberates 20% more light, could slash display power consumption
https://phys.org/news/2021-06-nanotech- ... slash.html
by University of Michigan

A new electrode that could free up 20% more light from organic light-emitting diodes has been developed at the University of Michigan. It could help extend the battery life of smartphones and laptops, or make next-gen televisions and displays much more energy efficient.

The approach prevents light from being trapped in the light-emitting part of an OLED, enabling OLEDs to maintain brightness while using less power. In addition, the electrode is easy to fit into existing processes for making OLED displays and light fixtures.

"With our approach, you can do it all in the same vacuum chamber," said L. Jay Guo, U-M professor of electrical and computer engineering and corresponding author of the study.

Unless engineers take action, about 80% of the light produced by an OLED gets trapped inside the device. It does this due to an effect known as waveguiding. Essentially, the light rays that don't come out of the device at an angle close to perpendicular get reflected back and guided sideways through the device. They end up lost inside the OLED.
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1563
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

Jigsaw Puzzle Lights Up With Each Piece
Putting the last piece of a project together and finally finishing it up is a satisfying feeling. When the last piece of a puzzle like that is a literal puzzle, though, it’s even better. [Nadieh] has been working on this jigsaw puzzle that displays a fireworks-like effect whenever a piece is placed correctly, using a lot of familiar electronics and some unique, well-polished design.

The puzzle is a hexagonal shape and based on a hexagonally symmetric spirograph, with the puzzle board placed into an enclosure which houses all of the electronics. Each puzzle piece has a piece of copper embedded in a unique location so when it is placed on the board, the device can tell if it was placed properly or not. If it was, an array of color LEDs mounted beneath a translucent diffuser creates a lighting effect that branches across the entire board like an explosion. The large number of pieces requires a multiplexer for the microcontroller, an ATtiny3216.
Image
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
wjfox
Site Admin
Posts: 1378
Joined: Sat May 15, 2021 6:09 pm
Location: Plague Island
Contact:

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by wjfox »

"Take it easy, nothing matters in the end."
– William Shatner
User avatar
Yuli Ban
Posts: 1563
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:44 pm

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by Yuli Ban »

New electronic paper displays brilliant colours
Imagine sitting out in the sun, reading a digital screen as thin as paper, but seeing the same image quality as if you were indoors. Thanks to research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, it could soon be a reality. A new type of reflective screen – sometimes described as ‘electronic paper’ – offers optimal colour display, while using ambient light to keep energy consumption to a minimum.
Traditional digital screens use a backlight to illuminate the text or images displayed upon them. This is fine indoors, but we’ve all experienced the difficulties of viewing such screens in bright sunshine. Reflective screens, however, attempt to use the ambient light, mimicking the way our eyes respond to natural paper.
“For reflective screens to compete with the energy-intensive digital screens that we use today, images and colours must be reproduced with the same high quality. That will be the real breakthrough. Our research now shows how the technology can be optimised, making it attractive for commercial use,” says Marika Gugole, Doctoral Student at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology.
And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future
User avatar
Time_Traveller
Posts: 544
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 4:49 pm
Location: Glasgow, The Republic of Scotland October 17th 2505 C.E.

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by Time_Traveller »

In 2030, You Won't Own Any Gadgets
7/06/21

Owning things used to be simple. You went to the store. You paid money for something, whether it be a TV, clothes, books, toys, or electronics. You took your item home, and once you paid it off, that thing belonged to you. It was yours. You could do whatever you wanted with it. That’s not how it is today, and by 2030, technology will have advanced to the point that even the idea of owning objects might be obsolete.

Many a think piece has been written about how Millennials aren’t as interested in owning things as their predecessors. After decades of Boomers keeping up with the Joneses, Millennials were supposedly “more about the experience” than physical goods. There’s a kernel of truth in that, but the shift to services was telegraphed a long time ago.

Back in 2016, the World Economic Forum released a Facebook video with eight predictions it had for the world in 2030. “You’ll own nothing. And you’ll be happy,” it says. “Whatever you want, you’ll rent. And it’ll be delivered by drone.”

“Everything you considered a product, has now become a service,” reads another WEF essay published on Forbes. “We have access to transportation, accommodation, food, and all the things we need in our daily lives. One by one all these things became free, so it ended up not making sense for us to own much.”

The WEF’s framing is overly optimistic, but this is the future we’re rapidly hurtling toward. I rent my apartment, and therefore, all the home appliances in it. If I wanted, I could rent all my furniture and clothes. Sure, I have my own computer and phone, but there are plenty of people who use company-issued gadgets. And if I didn’t want company-issued items, I could always rely on electronics rentals. I like cooking and grocery shopping, but I could just sign up for a meal kit service and call it a day. I wouldn’t even need appliances like toasters, rice cookers, blenders, air fryers, or anything beyond a microwave. To get around, there are Citi Bikes, Uber, and Zipcar.
https://gizmodo.com/in-2030-you-wont-ow ... 1847176540
“People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but *actually* from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint - it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly... time-y wimey... stuff.” - Steven Moffat
wendywicked
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2021 1:33 pm

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by wendywicked »

weatheriscool wrote: Sat Jun 05, 2021 6:45 am MIT's world-first digital fabric can collect, store and process data
By Nick Lavars
June 03, 2021
https://newatlas.com/wearables/mits-wor ... cess-data/
While the fabrics we wear today might keep us warm and protect us from the elements, scientists continue to demonstrate how they might soon do far more than that. MIT scientist Yoel Fink has been at the cutting edge of this field for more than a decade and has just made a significant breakthrough, demonstrating the first ever digital fabric-fiber that can store and process information, among other some other exciting functions.

From stretchable fabrics that power wearables with sweat, to shirts that harvest energy from movement, and weavable LED fibers that could form wearable displays, the field of smart textiles is one brimming with exciting possibilities. Fink and his colleagues demonstrated an interesting one way back in 2010, developing fibers that detect sound and can be woven into fabric to turn it into a sensitive microphone.

Fink's team has now broken further ground in this area. They describe the electronic fibers that have been developed so far as analog, in that they can carry a continuous electrical signal but not digital information, which would be processed in 0s and 1s. To bring this kind of capability to textile fibers, the MIT team had to get creative.
We are really living now in a world full of collecting data even our fabrics! Privacy nows pays a lot.
User avatar
Ken_J
Posts: 55
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 5:25 pm

Re: Home & Leisure News and Discussions

Post by Ken_J »

Time_Traveller wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 7:22 pm In 2030, You Won't Own Any Gadgets
7/06/21

Owning things used to be simple. You went to the store. You paid money for something, whether it be a TV, clothes, books, toys, or electronics. You took your item home, and once you paid it off, that thing belonged to you. It was yours. You could do whatever you wanted with it. That’s not how it is today, and by 2030, technology will have advanced to the point that even the idea of owning objects might be obsolete.

Many a think piece has been written about how Millennials aren’t as interested in owning things as their predecessors. After decades of Boomers keeping up with the Joneses, Millennials were supposedly “more about the experience” than physical goods. There’s a kernel of truth in that, but the shift to services was telegraphed a long time ago.

Back in 2016, the World Economic Forum released a Facebook video with eight predictions it had for the world in 2030. “You’ll own nothing. And you’ll be happy,” it says. “Whatever you want, you’ll rent. And it’ll be delivered by drone.”

“Everything you considered a product, has now become a service,” reads another WEF essay published on Forbes. “We have access to transportation, accommodation, food, and all the things we need in our daily lives. One by one all these things became free, so it ended up not making sense for us to own much.”

The WEF’s framing is overly optimistic, but this is the future we’re rapidly hurtling toward. I rent my apartment, and therefore, all the home appliances in it. If I wanted, I could rent all my furniture and clothes. Sure, I have my own computer and phone, but there are plenty of people who use company-issued gadgets. And if I didn’t want company-issued items, I could always rely on electronics rentals. I like cooking and grocery shopping, but I could just sign up for a meal kit service and call it a day. I wouldn’t even need appliances like toasters, rice cookers, blenders, air fryers, or anything beyond a microwave. To get around, there are Citi Bikes, Uber, and Zipcar.
https://gizmodo.com/in-2030-you-wont-ow ... 1847176540
they can fuck right off with that. I get the appeal of mobility that allows you to literally not have to drag around an anchor of everything you own, which starts to feel like your things own you... but monthly rental or lease payments for literally everything? 20$ for a cheap microwave, once and you own it... or 3$ a month for for indefinite time? by five years in you have paid 9x as much for the same usage and you have no resell rights.

Thats just a small sample. Washer and drier, dishes, silverware, chairs, beds, fridges, ovens. etc.

this is just another form of money extraction in excess of the value of the life given to the people renting. and the likelyhood of substandard used goods having defects, or in the case of furniture, things like bedbugs.

and logistically it's ripe for a bunch of hidden charges, micro transactions ect.
Post Reply