3D Printing News & Discussions

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Yuli Ban
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3D Printing News & Discussions

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World's first raw earth material 3D-printed house is ready for residents
TECLA represents a viable model and key example of low-carbon housing construction that attains close to a net zero footprint as a result of its reliance on 100 percent locally-obtained raw earth materials and the elimination of waste and scraps.

To achieve these minimalist buildings, the construction process begins with digging and a mixing stage where regional soil is blended with water and special additives. Engineers analyze all terrain samples before moving on to the printing phase of the external house structure.

Then, a pair of synchronized printer arms coordinate their construction stage in a smooth dance of machinery. Each printer has the ability to print an area of ​​538 sq ft. A single TECLA module can be completed within 200 hours, utilizing 7,000 machine codes, 350 0.47-thick layers, 93.2 miles of extrusion, and 2,119 cu ft of natural materials for an average consumption of less than 6 kW.
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Industry Collaboration Highlights Path to 3D Printed Lungs
May 17, 2021

Earlier this year 3D Systems announced that they would be stepping up their efforts in the realm of bioprinting, in particular they intend to collaborate further with United Therapeutics and their subsidiary Lung Biotechnology, for the manufacture of printed organ scaffolds.

So what are the details of this enhanced collaboration and what does it mean for the future of 3D printed organs? Read on to know more about their development plans for engineered lungs.

Collaboration

3D Systems has been working with United Therapeutics for a while and much of their work has been focused on the development of printer systems and processes for organ scaffolds. It would seem that the main platform being used here has been the 3D Systems Figure 4 system in combination with various proprietary bioinks.

In 2020 it was announced that the companies had successfully demonstrated high rate, micron-level printing, which is required for vascularization (needed to sustain living cells). In addition, they had made significant developments in material formulation using a unique rhCollagen.
https://3dprinting.com/company/3d-syste ... ted-lungs/
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Why astronauts are printing organs in space
2nd June 2021

Andrew Morgan has seen some of the worst things that can happen to the human body. As a battlefield doctor with the US Army, he's treated young soldiers whose bodies had been torn and broken in explosions. "I've seen the loss of limbs and some devastating injuries as the result of blasts," he says. Witnessing the slow healing and recovery process first-hand got Morgan thinking – what if new tissue or even entire organs could be simply printed off to replace injured body parts?

"The ability to transplant tissues made from the injured person's own cells would be hugely beneficial," he says.

That's why Morgan conducted a series of unusual experiments over several months last year – in outer space. You see, Morgan is also a Nasa astronaut. In April 2020 he returned from a 272-day stay on the International Space Station (ISS). While he orbited 248 miles (400km) above the Earth's surface, Morgan created living tissue, cell by cell, using a 3D printer and something called bio-ink.

"It's not unlike changing a printer cartridge at home," says Morgan of the equipment he used. "You put in the ink cartridge, allow the culture to develop and then remove the tissue cassette for analysis."

So far, so simple. But there is a reason why Morgan and his fellow astronaut Christina Koch were doing these experiments while in orbit.
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2021 ... obal-en-GB
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Yuli Ban
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Military Looks for Novel Ways to Employ 3D Printing
In April, the Army signed a contract for its “Jointless Hull Project,” which has an ambitious goal of developing a 3D metal printer so large that it can create a military truck exterior in one giant piece.

“The mission is to develop a large-scale tool capable of producing single, jointless combat vehicle hulls at a near net size of 30-foot-by-20-foot-by-12 foot in size,” Larry “LJ” Holmes, principal investigator at ASTRO America, the nonprofit that is working with the Army to develop the massive 3D printer, said in a statement.

Additive manufacturing — also known as 3D printing — has been in development for decades and the U.S. military branches and the defense industrial base have both integrated the advanced manufacturing technique in their processes.

However, in January the Defense Department’s Joint Defense Manufacturing Council, the office of the deputy director for strategic technology protection and exploitation and the office of the undersecretary of defense for research and engineering released the Pentagon’s first additive manufacturing strategy.
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World's first 3D printed school opens in Malawi

13th July 2021

[...]

UNICEF estimates a shortage of 36,000 classrooms in Malawi. It would take 70 years – until 2090 – to fund and construct all these buildings with conventional methods. However, 3D printing could reduce that timeframe to just a single decade.

https://www.futuretimeline.net/blog/202 ... school.htm


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World's first 3D-printed steel bridge opens in Amsterdam

15 July 2021

The first ever 3D-printed steel bridge has opened in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. It was created by robotic arms using welding torches to deposit the structure of the bridge layer by layer, and is made of 4500 kilograms of stainless steel.

The 12-metre-long MX3D Bridge was built by four commercially available industrial robots and took six months to print. The structure was transported to its location over the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in central Amsterdam last week and is now open to pedestrians and cyclists.

More than a dozen sensors attached to the bridge after the printing was completed will monitor strain, movement, vibration and temperature across the structure as people pass over it and the weather changes. This data will be fed into a digital model of the bridge.

Engineers will use this model to study the properties of the unique material and will employ machine learning to spot any trends in the data that could indicate maintenance or modification is necessary. They also hope it will help designers understand how 3D-printed steel might be used for larger and more complex building projects.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/22 ... amsterdam/


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