3D-printed homes news and discussions

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weatheriscool
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Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 6:16 pm

3D-printed homes news and discussions

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3D-printed home envisioned as blueprint for affordable housing
By Adam Williams
June 15, 2021
https://newatlas.com/architecture/3d-pr ... -humanity/
Is 3D printing the future of affordable housing? It certainly seems possible. The burgeoning technology has the potential to construct houses faster and cheaper than with traditional building techniques, and has already resulted in a low-cost housing project in Mexico. Now global housing nonprofit Habitat for Humanity is creating a 3D-printed home that it hopes will become a blueprint for affordable housing.

The prototype house is currently under construction in Tempe, Arizona, and is expected to be completed by September and serve as home to a low-income family. It will have a usable floorspace of 1,738 sq ft (161 sq m) and will contain three bedrooms and two bathrooms, as well as a living room and kitchen, plus a garage.

More ambitiously though, Habitat for Humanity aims to build on its experience making the home to produce a series of affordable 3D-printed houses. How affordable? We reached out to the nonprofit and received the following statement.
weatheriscool
Posts: 1588
Joined: Sun May 16, 2021 6:16 pm

Re: 3D-printed homes news and discussions

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3D-printable phase-change materials insulate buildings better at scale
By Michael Irving
July 12, 2021
Heating and cooling systems are some of the biggest energy guzzlers in use, so passive temperature control could be a good way to reduce emissions. Phase-change materials (PCMs) show promise for this, and now engineers at Texas A&M have developed a new PCM composite that can be 3D printed.

The name “phase-change materials” is pretty self-explanatory – these materials will switch between phases of matter as the temperature changes. One of the most promising applications for this technology is insulation: the PCM melts into a liquid as it absorbs heat, cooling its surroundings. As the ambient temperature cools, the material will solidify again, releasing its stored heat.

In the past, PCMs have been used in coffee cups to keep hot drinks hot, fabrics that keep wearers warm or cool as needed, liquid coatings that prevent frost build-up, and in building materials that better regulate indoor temperature. It’s that last one that the researchers on the new study wanted to improve.
https://newatlas.com/materials/3d-print ... nsulation/
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