Cryonics & Cryogenics News and Discussions

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Cryonics & Cryogenics News and Discussions

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Nap Quest: How Suspended Animation Could Fuel Space Exploration

May 31st 2021

In space, no one can hear you sleep — but it’s possible that alarms could one day wake astronauts on alien worlds hundreds or thousands of light years away. This is the promise and potential of suspended animation, sometimes called human hibernation or “cryosleep.” While it’s still (mostly) the stuff of science fiction, new advancements in snooze-related science could turn this into a tired-and-true method for space exploration.

[...]

Both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) have begun preliminary research into cryosleep solutions. But how exactly would this suspended snooze-fest work?

It all starts with torpor, a hypermetabolic state already seen in animals such as hummingbirds that significantly reduces their body temperature and, in turn, the amount of energy required to keep their bodies alive. While torpor bears similarities to true hibernation, including lowered body temperatures and slowed processes, torpor cycles typically require daily food foraging. Meanwhile, hibernation relies on increased resource consumption prior to deep sleep but is associated with much longer periods of reduced activity. Successful snooze-based solutions for astronauts are about splitting the difference.

“If we were able to reduce an astronaut’s basic metabolic rate by 75% — similar to what we can observe in nature with large hibernating animals such as certain bears — we could end up with substantial mass and cost savings, making long-duration exploration missions more feasible,” notes Dr. Jennifer Ngo-Anh, a research team leader for the ESA study. If humans could be put into a state of controlled torpor that reduced consumption needs without requiring the massive pre-feed to sustain hibernation, it could be our ticket to the stars.

The good news? This idea isn’t just science fiction. Controlled hibernation has been used to help improve recovery after serious events, such as gunshot wounds, and reduce the risk of brain damage during surgery. In practice, this requires the slow decrease of internal body temperature.

Read more: https://now.northropgrumman.com/nap-que ... ploration/
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Frozen eggs and sperm storage limit increased to 55 years

44 minutes ago

Storage limits for eggs, sperm and embryos will go up to 55 years under government plans that ministers say will give people greater choice over when to start a family.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid said the current limit of 10 years was "severely restrictive."

Modern freezing techniques mean eggs can be stored indefinitely without deterioration, research from the Royal College of Obstetricians has suggested.

The plans need parliamentary approval.

The Department for Health said there would be extra conditions around third party donors and use of a person's frozen cells after they have died.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-58456832
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New cryopreservation technique revives heart tissue after three days

18th October 2021

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have successfully revived human heart tissue after it had been preserved in a subfreezing, supercooled state for up to three days.

[...]

By preserving cardiac tissue at a constant volume in a rigid isochoric chamber, researchers managed to prevent the formation of ice crystals that could have damaged the micro heart muscle cells. They examined the structural integrity of the heart cells and whether the tissue retained normal functions, such as autonomous beating, and responsiveness to drugs and external electrical stimuli. Tests confirmed that their method – which they call "isochoric supercooling" – had not altered the structural integrity of the heart tissue, nor did it significantly affect the beat rate or beat waveform.

[...]

In the longer term, the researchers believe their new cooling and revival technique will be scaled up to full organs.

Read more: https://www.futuretimeline.net/blog/202 ... meline.htm


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